How do you stabilize your rifle for Antelope?

How do you stabilize your rifle for Antelope?


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    108

MrSunday

Senior Member
Joined
May 21, 2016
Messages
100
Location
WA
I'll use my tripod, bipod, backpack or anything else I have at hand that will work. I like options and train shooting from all.
 

Goatie

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2019
Messages
219
Location
Minnesota
I own a great tripod with a hog saddle/Arca. Of the 8 antelope I’ve been involved in taking, a simple harris was the best option for a steady confident shot on every one of them. The weight isn’t a factor while pronghorn hunting so why settle for a pack?

adding photos cuz they speak louder
 

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NEWHunter

Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2018
Messages
51
Location
Milwaukee, WI
I always bring a bipod and used it to take my first two. Both shots were a couple hundred yards or so. My last one was off hand but that was a 20 yard shot.
 

Jimss

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
1,350
I've been hunting Wyo antelope my entire life. One thing you'll learn quickly in Wyo is the wind usually blows 10 to 40 mph around 360 days a year! The closer to the ground you shoot the better off you are in high winds. My preference is to shoot off my backpack. I usually stalk to a saddle or ridge overlook with that in mind. I try to find a small opening between brush/grass where I can set my backpack down for a clear-prone shot. Some times that's not possible. I always have my spotting scope with me on a tripod when stalking to field judge bucks and make certain I shoot the right buck. If I'm in a brushy spot I shoot from my spotting scope on a tripod. I really see no reason to carry shooting sticks or use a bipod if you have a backpack plus spotting scope on a tripod.
 

eaglemountainman

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
402
Location
Florida,Dwneast Me,Catskills
I own a great tripod with a hog saddle/Arca. Of the 8 antelope I’ve been involved in taking, a simple harris was the best option for a steady confident shot on every one of them. The weight isn’t a factor while pronghorn hunting so why settle for a pack?

adding photos cuz they speak louder
I use my pack because the grass, sage and greasewood where I hunt is much taller than the vegetation in your photos, and a prone shot is out of the question. I'm not a fan of rifle mounted bipods anyway. I have a tripod if I really need to get tall.
 

ckeehn

Newbie
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Messages
4
Tripod worked well for last year but i had to wait until the lope cleared sage... 2 years ago i was off hand because sage was too tall. Tripod or something similar would be very beneficial
 

wytx

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
1,084
Location
Wyoming
Bipod.
Bipod is short enough for prone and tall enough for sitting shot.
 

manitou1

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
645
Location
Missouri
I use my pack mostly, but have shot off my tripod in tall sage. I have also free handed a few close ones and used an old stock tank on a buck one year. Whatever is available and works. I would definitely always have a plan "B" for tall sagebrush.
 

2bgop

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
11
If I am glassing, then the tripod. If not, then bipod if possible.
 

Crusader

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2016
Messages
129
Location
St. Louis
Backpack unless I need more height or am on a sidehill or other awkward setting, then it's shooting sticks like rickjames80 posted. Only mine are older, I think Stoney Point brand back then.
 

ToolMann

Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2020
Messages
57
Location
Parker, CO
Sitting height bipod to get above sage and grass. If I need more stability but cant go prone because of grass, I use the sitting height bipod in front and sit with my pack between my legs and use the pack frame to stabilize the rear of the rifle. It works pretty well. I could shoot a few hundred yards like that. If its any farther I have to get prone.
Interesting. Not sure why I haven't thought of using my pack for a rear rest when sitting with a tall bipod or Bogpod tripod. I have trouble getting steady sitting and shooting out past 200. Will definitely try this out at my next range session. I always have my internal frame pack with me, so makes sense. Thanks!
 

406Smith

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
594
I’ve used: bipod, tripod, backpack, fence rail/fence post, and offhand.
 

thinhorn_AK

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
4,631
Location
Alaska
Those tripods weren’t a thing back when I used to antelope hunt. I had good luck with a Harris bipod though and my dad seemed to like shooting sticks.
 

OXN939

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2018
Messages
1,185
Location
VA
and just tuck my left hand under the butt for rear support.

Something to consider- get a sock, fill it with airsoft BBs and tie it off. Carry this in your day pack and use it as a rear rest. One of the only items I know of that can bring a substantive increase in long distance accuracy for less than the cost of a cheap beer.
 

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