How does the SIG Sierra 3 BDX stand up?

Greyes

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
308
Needing a new scope for my rifle. I was originally leaning Leupold. But I already own a SIG 1800 BDX rangefinder so I an curious about the SIG sierra 3 BDX scope. Not a lot of places have it in stock to look at (or through) so I am wondering what everyone’s opinion’s are on it? Hows the glass quality? How well does the BDX system actually work in real life hunting scenarios? Not just bench shooting.

Thanks in advance for your advice!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

bsnedeker

Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2018
Messages
2,083
Location
MT
Personally, I like mine a lot. Once you've entered your ballistics and synced everything up you just need to go out to distance and verify your hitting in the right place and make any adjustments, just like any other scope. The furthest I can shoot at paper out in my neck of the woods is 400 yards but I'm shooting under 1 MOA at that distance and can ring steel out to 600. It holds zero and the glass looks good to my untrained eye.

I killed an antelope, 2 deer, and an elk with it last year in various lighting conditions (elk was at 80 so didn't use the electronicals for that one!). Furthest I've killed anything with it was 300 but I wouldn't hesitate to shoot it out to 400 on a deer and 600 on an elk.

I will say this is not the scope for you if you want to shoot much further than that. The ballistics stop after 800 yards so if you want to shoot further than that you'd be dialing and I'm haven't tested that at all to tell you if it actually tracks.
 

MTAntelope

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2020
Messages
19
If you are in to trusting reviews, the Sig Sierra scopes consistently rank very high, even against much more expensive brands. I just purchased a Sierra6 and the quality of the glass seems to be good. My only complaint is the reticle lines are too thick.
 

ScottR_EHJ

Senior Member
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
Mar 8, 2012
Messages
1,467
Location
Wyoming
We have not had any issues with them other than the the learning curve associated with a new product.
 
OP
G

Greyes

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
308
They are not legal in some states, if that matters to you.

That does matter to me. I was not aware of any regulations stipulating between electronic vs traditional scopes. Only states that don’t allow scopes in general. Do you know which states don’t allow electronic scopes? Cause depending on that it may not matter to me haha.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Bubblehide

Senior Member
Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
2,457
That does matter to me. I was not aware of any regulations stipulating between electronic vs traditional scopes. Only states that don’t allow scopes in general. Do you know which states don’t allow electronic scopes? Cause depending on that it may not matter to me haha.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I am referring to being illegal for hunting big game only. If I recall correctly, Co was one. Unfortunately, I don't recall the others. But, the last I checked, the trend appeared to be growing.
 
OP
G

Greyes

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
308
I am referring to being illegal for hunting big game only. If I recall correctly, Co was one. Unfortunately, I don't recall the others. But, the last I checked, the trend appeared to be growing.

Good to know! I will have to look in it that more! Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

swavescatter

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2021
Messages
166
I think many of those state restrictions apply to having the ballistics calculators in the scope itself, and/or the laser rangefinder (Burris Eliminator?)

My understanding is that Sig skirts this law by having your phone do the ballistics calcs and rangefinder separate.

Other than allowing users more accurate electronic dope, I don't see how this is much of an advantage. If you have time to wake the scope, range it and then shoot, you have time to range it, dial and shoot...

It also takes some time/knowledge to dial in your ballistics to the app beforehand. Easier than building a dope chart, maybe, but not by much. In fact if I didn't run the BDX scopes I would zero at 300 yards and only dial for long range.

I like the accuracy promised by the electronic dope and partial first focal plane feature (dot moves with zoom), but I agree that the reticle is a bit thick when sighting in. After carrying the rifle around quite a bit for the past few weeks I didn't notice any loss of zero.
 

BRGT2

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2021
Messages
11
Personally, I like mine a lot. Once you've entered your ballistics and synced everything up you just need to go out to distance and verify your hitting in the right place and make any adjustments, just like any other scope. The furthest I can shoot at paper out in my neck of the woods is 400 yards but I'm shooting under 1 MOA at that distance and can ring steel out to 600. It holds zero and the glass looks good to my untrained eye.

I killed an antelope, 2 deer, and an elk with it last year in various lighting conditions (elk was at 80 so didn't use the electronicals for that one!). Furthest I've killed anything with it was 300 but I wouldn't hesitate to shoot it out to 400 on a deer and 600 on an elk.

I will say this is not the scope for you if you want to shoot much further than that. The ballistics stop after 800 yards so if you want to shoot further than that you'd be dialing and I'm haven't tested that at all to tell you if it actually tracks.
Helpful info, thanks for that.
 

swampthing

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2019
Messages
516
Location
prince george british columbia
They are a decent scope. I have a bdx 3 and a bdx 6. The optics on the 3 are "decent" and the optics on the 6 are "pretty good!" Mechanically they are both very accurate in the dials and adjustments. Once dialed they certainly put a bullet in the right spot. The crosshairs are thick but in reality its still easy to aim where you want.
 
Top