How long do you hold on target?

Hawker

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Mar 11, 2012
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As I was practicing today I started holding on target for 3 seconds and was amazed how much my shooting improved. The only thing bad I noticed was I couldn't shoot as many arrows. Not that that is a bad thing. I did find it a little tuff to hold on target as opposed to holding at ancher.
 

TheRambler

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Jan 13, 2013
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NW Connecticut
I shoot instictive. I tried lots of different aiming methods, including holding on target longer and i found i am consistently more accurate when i just draw and release without giving it much thought at all. I joke about it, but the more i think about a shot the more often i miss that shot. I am sure this varies widely between people, but that's how it is for me
 
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Hawker

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Mar 11, 2012
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Michigan
After a little more thought I think it helps me pick out the center of the target. Instead of just the target.
 

bowinhand

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Feb 26, 2012
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Colorado
anywhere from 1-10 sec. and as long as I reach full draw, consistent anchor point, and pick a spot no problem. without following some sort of system one can develop problems such as snap shooting and the dreaded "target panic". One should be able to hold steady on target for ten sec if the draw weight is appropriate for the shooter.
 

HurricaneHuge

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Jan 12, 2013
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Most shot sequences fall in the 7-9 second range. By that I mean from the time you start to draw until the arrow is gone. Short of that and odds are you're snap shooting at the targets. Longer, and fatigue generally starts diminishing your ability to hold steady and follow through properly.
 

tater

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BC
The 7-9 shot sequence for recurve/longbow is a more target shooting based style. This often used by archers using an 'aiming based' style.
Folks that swing draw for hunting often use a quick draw/anchor/release method (Howard Hill in particular). Many often perceive it as 'snap shooting', but it is just a faster form of target acquisition and reaching anchor before release.

Instructors like Rick Welch preach a solid two count after anchor prior to release, and that is often a good method.

As long as there is complete target focus and a full draw with back tension is achieved followed by a consistent anchor and clean release, the time frame is archer dependent.
I practice everything from a quick draw/release to a super slow incremental draw followed by a full ten second count to be flexible in the field. This is the true benefit of trad gear, being able to draw and shoot from a variety of positions in a variety of scenarios depending on the situation. Everything from an inverse draw to shooting fully hunched over is possible with accuracy, as long as the draw tension/anchor/release is consistent.

Look up some of Ron LaClaire's old videos of him inverse drawing and shooting while laying on the ground with an 80# longbow...
 

G Posik

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Mar 1, 2012
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Houston,Texas
I use the swing draw method and do not typically hold very long. I will take a few shots mixed in here and there where I do hold for about 10 seconds. I will do a few in the 5 second range. This way if I have to gold a few seconds in the field then it is nothing new.

Glenn
 

Shot

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Jan 10, 2013
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I hold at least 2 sec, average about 5 secs. This method has greatly increased my accuracy. It gives me time to allow the muscle/bones to "settle in" and right before the shot all I think about is form.
 

Rod

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Mar 5, 2012
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NE IOWA
I'm around 6 seconds in my shot sequence. I shoot with a clicker to ensure back tension. Sometimes in hunting situations it has to be quicker.
 

Coyote Commander

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Mar 5, 2013
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MT
I only got back into traditional a couple years ago. I was extremely over bowed (long draw length and a 55# factory bow) which started me onto a bad road of snap shooting everything.

I got a nice custom longbow in a more comfortable weight for me, and have since slowed down my shot sequence, my effective range has doubled and my groups have shrunk by 75%. I probably hold for 3-5 seconds at full draw on average. Something I just couldnt do for to many shots with my older bow.
 

Tilzbow

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Dec 25, 2012
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Reno, NV
I draw, establish back tension, focus on maintaining back tension while concentrating on the spot I want to hit. I continue to maintain back tension until the release happens. After anchoring and establishing back tension it sometimes this takes a couple of seconds for the release to happen, sometimes longer. The key is establishing and maintaining back tension until the shot just happens. Notice how many times I typed back tension? If you can't get and maintain that you'll never become a really good shot with traditional equipment.
 

nevadabugle

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Mar 8, 2013
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I hate it when I agree with tilzbow....but back tension is everything for me. I have noticed that for some people to use proper back tension they must hold longer at full draw. I've seen many more that loose back tension if they try to hold for a long period of time so for them a very quick type of snap shooting works the best. Ideally you will anchor, continue pulling with your back tension, continue aiming, and your subconscious shoots the arrow. For some that is fast others slow.
 

Tilzbow

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Your subconscious shoots the arrow? That's deep stuff right there..... Lets see how that works out for you this year brother!
 

Huntfun

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Apr 24, 2012
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Michigan
I focus on the spot I want to hit then draw and release as my string hand hits the spot on my face I use, zero hold time. It is done with little to no thought...just doing what I ahve doen for years and years. Everyone is different but for me the more I hold, the more I am forced to think about the shot and the worse I shoot. I run a traditional archery league that is focused on hunting where only traditional bows without sights or devices can be used. I am amazed at the wide range of shooting styles. We have people who hold so long the fast shooter like me are already on the next line waiting for them to let the arrow fly. These shooters are using some form of aiming method. What I have gathered for years of doing this league is the guys who hold long and are using some form of aming method are the one who are over concerned with their score and by doing so get so caught up mentally they do not enjoy their time nearly as much as what I call truly instictive shooters. To each his own on shooting style but if you have the time to shoot a lot and really let your instictive ability come forth I think you'll enjoy shooting more and take more game if you are a hunter.
 

goodgrouper

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Mar 14, 2012
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Somers Montana
I'm going to poach this thread a little bit, when you guys are aiming at a target do you use both eyes or one. I started trying to use one eye and I seem to be a little more accurate but I think two might be better for field of view.
 

Racethesunset

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Jan 8, 2013
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Arizona
I don't think anyone will complain about the question.

If your aiming eye is totally dominant, shooting one eye open should feel more 'natural', instinctive.

Recently, I have practiced loading the string to my jaw with both eyes open, and when it's time to loose, closing the left and letting her fly. It feels like there is less stimuli and imagery, shooting one eye open, which helps during the quiet of the shot.
 

goodgrouper

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Mar 14, 2012
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Somers Montana
I think that's where I'm headed with my technique as well. I draw with both eyes open then after I hit anchor I close my left eye, settle in and release. Thanks for your input.
 
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