How many of you packers use a tent stove while in the back country?

hflier

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Mar 18, 2012
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Tulsa, OK
How many of you packers use a tent stove while in the back country? Do you only take it when it's prone to snow etc.? If you use one - which set-up do you use?

Thanks
 

dotman

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Feb 24, 2012
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I don't take it for CO early archery but when Nov comes around it will be in the pack.

Kifaru supertarp and ti-goat cylinder stove.
 

muleman

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May 8, 2012
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Utah
If a wall tent goes I take a stove.

I have two late elk hunts this year and I'll have a stove on those backpack hunts. August and September Utah hunts I don't need a stove, but I should pack an AC unit. :)
 

ScottR_EHJ

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I use a medium stove from Seek Outside in the SO 6. When I am hunting with a partner it makes it a lot easier to haul it in. Once October 1st hits its the only option as most of the high country that I hunt is going to bring me plenty of snow and the need for being dry.
 

Lawnboi

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Mar 2, 2012
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North Central Wi
It all depends on the situation. Do i take my parastove and paratarp... yes, sometimes.

If im going fast and light, or its warm out, or im setting up camp every night, then ill leave the stove in the truck most of the time dependent on the weather.

If im staying in once place for a more than a day, its cold or really wet, or I just have time to sit and want to sit by a fire, then ill take it every time. Plus you save some weight because you can leave your gas stove at home.

If i could go back, i would have most likly gotten one of the ed t stoves or tigoat for my 'lightweight' stove. As i am not cooking on it, just the occasional boil, and mainly for heat. Its a good bit lighter.

It is amazing how fast i can cook moisture off my gear in the paratarp with the stove when its all sealed up. Boots are dry in a few hours. Clothing is dry in a few hours, and morning condensation is cooked off your gear almost instantly. Could easily save a trip, and my morale on some trips.

Now i can tell you i cannot wait to get a mega tarp, or sawtooth, and use a medium or large stove for my base camp type of shelter! (yes backpacking in) Cooking on those stoves is slick, and to have the ability to go hard all day, and go back and relax by a fire inside your shelter no matter the conditions outside will likly give me the motivation i need on any hunt in any weather.

Something about sitting in those shelters with that fire glowing is just soothing.

It all depends on how you want to camp. Sometimes its fun to be miserable, others you feel like throwing in the towel.
 

Madnik

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Apr 8, 2012
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Georgia, USA
"I use a medium stove from Seek Outside in the SO 6."

As do I. After years of hearing what I was missing, I decided to go the floorless shelter and stove route. I wanted something big enough for my family or friends and settled on something in the 6-person size range. The folks at Seekoutside were responsive to my inquiries, and offered an a competitive tipi-stove package that, at the time, was not advertised on their website. I pulled the trigger.

The package that I received included the tipi, a carbon fiber pole, stove jack, silnylon vent cover/screen for the stove jack hole (coverts it to a vent when the stove is not brought), full DWR liner, Easton Nano stakes, elastic tensioners, medium ti stove, 8' ti stove pipe, and silnylon sacks. The entire package weighs in at 9 lbs, 1 oz. (Note: SO has made tipis from various materials of various weights.)

I leave behind the liner, the stove jack vent cover, and the elastic tensioners and pack in 7 lbs, 2 oz. And while some will point out that to be relatively heavy, it isn't heavy for what you are getting. It is also a veritable palace on the mountain with 150 sq ft that you can stand in. Solo, I feel guilty when the weather roles in and I think of the poor guys suffering through in more cramped arrangements. Almost.

Would I leave it behind? Not for hunts of 3 or more days. At least not out west in the mountains. Yes, I'd be willing to bivi a night or two away it, using it as a base camp. But believe me, I'd be looking forward to returning.
 
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CrzyTrekker

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Aug 3, 2012
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San Luis Valley, Colorado
Kifaru small stove. It's fairly easy to heat water on the stove for cooking (mountain house meals, hot cocoa, etc.) using a titanium pot while also heating the shelter. I don't wait for a full boil because I filter all my water with a PUR Hiker. I don't carry a backpacking stove unless it is mid-summer and I leave the stove behind.

Love that little stove early in the morning!
 
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