how many trips to get one out?

darcytribe

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I've packed out two elk from 2 miles into a wilderness area. Both times it took 4 round trips to get it all out but I left the bones in the quarters. Some might say that's whimpy, i don't know. How many trips should one expect if you totally bone out the meat in the field? Or maybe a more precise question: How much does the boned-out meat weigh from an adult elk?
 

goodgrouper

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Last time I weighed the boned out meat from a bull it was 190 pounds, it was really hot out and I'm sure we could have done better on the neck if we had more time.
I fortunately cannot comment on how many trips it takes to pack one out because I have never done it with MY back. My two Norweigan Fjord horses pack a whole elk a piece and don't break a sweat.
 

littlebuf

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if its not real hot and you don't mind the walk 4 trips isn't wimpy, its enjoying the hunt. last solo elk took me 2 trips. 5 miles bone in quarters. not trying to sound tuff that's just what it was. I will never leave the bone in again. don't really know why I did, just one of those things I guess where it seemed like a good idea at the time. it was 80 plus when I got to the truck with my first load, second one was pretty heavy but I didn't lose any meat
 

dryflyguy

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Last time I weighed the boned out meat from a bull it was 190 pounds, it was really hot out and I'm sure we could have done better on the neck if we had more time.
I fortunately cannot comment on how many trips it takes to pack one out because I have never done it with MY back. My two Norweigan Fjord horses pack a whole elk a piece and don't break a sweat.
Love those horses! They don't do too well in deadfall because of those stumpy legs, but great horses.
 

Ross

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I've done many solo and it is a grind for sure, but I prefer 4 trips if I have the time and weather permits versus 3......your 4 trips was not whimpy, as any pack job by yourself is a whole lotta work! If you are unable to take anything at the time of the harvest and bone it out, I would plan on 3 trips for most of us.
 

Hike&Hunt

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If the horses are still in camp, one trip. If not, three guys still one trip just a bit more work and razzing the shooter all the way to the truck.

Goodgrouper: how do those horses do off trail? Not necessarily deadfall, just forest? Overall how well do they do in the mountains? I have a friend with a a pair that has offered them up to use and I have considered it, never taken him up on it.
 

goodgrouper

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They are amazing mountain horses. Like any horse it depends on their training and experience. Mine were raised in the Three Sisters ridden and packed since three year olds. I'm very fortunate to have such a great pair of Fjords they're rare. They will go over, through, up, and down anything I point them at.
 

sanchomaes

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Usually three for me when I am bringing out a bull. Most cows have been two trips. If weather permits four trips and I have the time I would certainly take it. Nothing wimpy about it at all. It seems as though I am usually so concerned about taking care of the meat that I try to get it out as fast as possible which means big heavy loads! Solo packouts are usually always big work and i would never consider one wimpy no matter how many trips is takes.

Character building experience according to Aron Snyder and James Petker.
 

Hunt'nFish

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They are amazing mountain horses. Like any horse it depends on their training and experience. Mine were raised in the Three Sisters ridden and packed since three year olds. I'm very fortunate to have such a great pair of Fjords they're rare. They will go over, through, up, and down anything I point them at.
Yep. My brother rides a Fjord. Hell of an animal, as sure footed as our mules.

As for packing out elk on your back. I can do 1/2 an elk per trip (minus ribs & spine).
So far 6 miles is my best. Me half, brother half.
But like others I prefer the mules, 1elk per mule.
Hunt'nFish

 

Jared Lampton

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Bull elk I've taken have yielded between 180 & 310 lbs of de-boned meat. I almost always bone out the front half but will sometimes leave the bone in the hind quarters because there is less waste that way. All depends on how far it is, what the terrain is like, weather and how much help I can scrounge up.
 

KMT

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Last year's bull weighed 228 pounds boned out. The number of trips depends on the individual.
 

squeekieslayer

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i take as much as I can on the first trip out.... typically the neck/backstraps/loins/rib meat (assuming it isn't all "bad" ;) haha)/cape and antlers (lets not kid ourselves.... i never shoot anything that is worth caping).

I bone the fronts because they are mostly stew/burger meat and the weight percentage is about 60/40 meat to bone it seems like. I leave the bone in the hinds because it is easier to strap them in and it seems they are much less percentage of the weight. I take a hind and a front out in each of the second and third trips.

I have done more, it sucked. Some guys can take a bull out in 1 trip as long as it's just on the internet ;)

Joe
 
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