Hunting with expensive rifles

bpotter

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2013
Messages
124
Yup. As long as you don't rust pit the metal (includes stainless), you can make it all shiny and pretty again when it's time to rebarrel.
 

hodgeman

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2012
Messages
866
Location
Delta Junction, AK
Simply put...if you're not opening a museum, don't worry about it.

My favorite rifle has been there and done that. It also looks the part. I sent it back to the maker for a new trigger a couple of years ago and got a call from their service manager who remarked "we really like getting rifles back that look like this. It means the owner is using it for what we built it for. We build some expensive rifles, but it breaks our hearts knowing that not 1 in 10 of them ever see an honest day in the field."
 

thinhorn_AK

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Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,086
Location
Alaska
Other than rust, who cares. Hell I even have a few that I do t really care if they rust a bit.
 

Buckblaster308

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
11
Location
Stevens Point, Wisconsin
I have a Remington 700 sendero sf ii. I keep it clean so it won’t rust but while hunting it gets the piss beat out of it. I’m out there to enjoy the outdoors and hopefully harvest an animal not baby my rifle. Plus like stated before the scars add character.
 

Smithb9841

Senior Member
Joined
May 26, 2019
Messages
100
The only rifle I Somewhat worry about scratching is the 270 I was given by my grandpa when he passed away. This rifle is from the 60s or 70s and he hunted with most of his life. It had a scratches in it when I got it and I’ve added some but at the end of the day it was meant for hunting being out in the wilderness and killing game not looking pretty. But I’d be lying if I said I’m not more careful with it than my other rifles including my Kimber mountain ascent which is my only expensive rifle. Those mean nothing compared to my grandpas old rifle.
 
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fatbacks

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2017
Messages
285
Location
Interior AK
I'll echo what everyone else said. My rifles look worn bu tare mechanically sound. In the field I tape the muzzle and then I keep a neoprene cover on the scope to keep lenses clear and to protect against any bumps.
 

Dinger

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2014
Messages
265
Location
Australia
Life is way too short, use the good china! Use those quality rifles for what they were made for.

Blaser K95 Luxus & Swaro Z6 - Been on many back pack hunts, #1 freezer filler and came home with scars from the NZ alps. The scope had a holiday at Swarovski HQ after a wee mishap. Replacement value in my currency (AUD) is about 10k.


 

rileybassman

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2015
Messages
1,356
Location
Kalispell
So for me, it comes down to my own mental peace when I'm in the field and I think that's gonna look different for everyone. When I was a teen, my dad gave me a model 70 30-06. I love that gun and it took my first deer, first elk, and many others. I exclusivity carried it for over 10 years. It got a bit beat up, but I refinished the stock and kept on going. That said, one hunt, we got stuck in a freezing rain storm, we were so cold, we hopped in the truck and drove home (4 hours). When I got home, I had a tiny bit of rust on the barrel and that killed me (admittedly my fault, but we were borderline hypothermic so we weren't thinking about gear at that point)... so I ended up buying stainless/synthetic guns and now those are my primary hunting guns and the 70 is my nice weather/safe gun.

A few years back, I bought a Kimber Montana... money has been a little tight last few years... since having kids lol... and I found that I was always paranoid about the montana in the field... great gun, but the stock felt slightly fragile to me... so I sold it, bought a tikka, had 400 bucks left over for kiddo stuff, and now my wife and I both carry tikkas.

For me, at this phase of life, I try and hit the bell curve of value/quality/durability - for everyone that looks different, but for me, I get the most peace of mind out of hunting with synthetic, stainless guns.
 

Jsunkler

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2018
Messages
228
Location
Eastern Shore
If you are worried about the firearm while hunting, try a rapid rifle cover or something similar. They will protect the firearm as much as you possibly could in the field, while also being somewhat ready for a quick shot.

I do not use one on my firearms as I am not too worried on the cosmetic damage that occurs to them, love the battle scars on my weapons.

My current big game rifle is a High County Stalker from Brown Precision topped with a Swaro z5. Short of my truck, its by far my most valuable item I own.
 

Wrench

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2018
Messages
913
Location
WA
I'm worried about beating my scope...so I run a coat on it, the stick, easily fixed.
 

camecolb

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2019
Messages
16
Location
Boise, ID
I bought a Kimber Montana this year and it is by far the most expensive rifle I have ever purchased. While I like it I think I may try to upgrade for some more accuracy. Maybe a CA Ridgeline, Cooper Backcountry, Fierce or other lightweight model. Maybe even build a custom off an old rifle from my grandpa.

For those that hunt with expensive rifles what do you do, if anything, to protect the rifle from damage? Specifically, I hunt a lot of brush in the SW. The oak brush scratches at everything. All my rifles are marked up from it. After 1 day my Kimber stock is already marked up from walking through the oak.
What is wrong with the accuracy of the Kimber Montana?
 

rileybassman

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2015
Messages
1,356
Location
Kalispell
Nothing wrong but I think I can get something better.
There's a good thread on 24hourcampfire about accurizing the Montana. I followed it to a T and one of my first 5 shot groups with my reloads was this. Was getting great velocity too.


Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

16Bore

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2014
Messages
1,919
Double rifles cost as much as a truck and get schelpped all over Africa. No one seems to care.
 
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