Insulated or uninsulated rubber boots AK?

geriggs

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Those whom have been to AK, did u wear insulated or uninsulated rubber boots when moose hunting mid sept?
 

Yellowknife

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I live in Alaska....does that count?

I have both, but strongly prefer un-insulated in Sept, and we usually hunt at relatively high elevation (colder nights). It's typically just not nearly cold enough in Sept to need anything more than a pair of wool socks. Others opinions can and will vary.

Actually use leathers about 85% of the time where I hunt.
 
OP
G

geriggs

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Great, you would know as well as most. I figured as much but just wanted some more opinions. Thanks
 

Daniel_M

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I commented on the other thread but I think it depends on the terrain, really. If you know where you're going and the type of terrain you'll encounter, let that dictate the footwear.
 

Larry Bartlett

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the technical problem you might find with insulated rubbers is getting the inside saturated on cool days, and if you dont get them dried out sufficiently...the next cold morning you'll have cold iceboots. The campfire dry technique is tricky with rubber/neoprene boots...

For the reason is go uninsulated and bring dry warm wool socks to insulate and control moisture variables.

lb
 

Kevin Dill

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No argument whatsoever with the opinions expressed above. I'll play the contrarian role here...

My feet would probably die in uninsulated boots on a September moose hunt. I routinely hunt valleys with lots of cold frosty mornings (heavy frost the majority) and have seen a solid week of accumulating snow with temps to single digits by the 20th. I used to wear Schnee's pacs and they didn't cut it...partly because of water absorption (leather) over a 10 day hunt. I made the switch to 1000gm rubber Lacrosse boots a few years ago and that solved things. No wet boots. Change outer socks once a day at lunch and interior of boot never gets damp.

I suppose my overall advice is to know your feet and be careful. I (and my partner) have seen mornings so cold our toes and forefeet ached badly inside boots that weren't warm. Having that happen for hours is certainly not fun.
 

Larry Bartlett

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Yeah, cold toes put a halt to fun in my camp, so this thread is a good one to point out "preferences." I know this is a rubber boot thread, but the cold toes thing has be batting one more for waders and boots.

The ability to boil a few cups of water on frosty mornings and fill my wading boots before slipping my stocking feet into the warmth is the Holy Grail of Hunting.

I know every terrain and hunt style decision comes back to boots, so just some lowland moose country advice i recon...

some guys live in xtratuffs and LaCrosse, but can't say I do.
 

AKMAN

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Put this in the other one, but happy to add it here too:

Insulated. No question.
Some people might like just socks for sitting at 27 degrees, but not this guy. I actually hunt in Schnees Hunter IIs (with liner) and the taller the better. I wear Xtratufs and lacrosse Alphaburlys too but the Schnees cross just as much swamp and water and feel a lot nicer. I take two pair of liners and always have happy feet.


To touch on the cold morning boots syndrome, that's another +1 for the Hunter IIs. I have in a pinch, slept in my schnees liners. On a moose (or any really) hunt where your feet are a priority, the added weight of another pair of liners is not even worth discussing. By the next time you wear them (better than 36 hours) (liner 1, night, liner 2, night, liner 1, etc) the liners will be toasty warm and completely dry.
This year I'll be out early for moose so I'm taking a short pair (7") and a tall (16") pair of liners.
 

Yellowknife

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No argument whatsoever with the opinions expressed above. I'll play the contrarian role here...

My feet would probably die in uninsulated boots on a September moose hunt. I routinely hunt valleys with lots of cold frosty mornings (heavy frost the majority) and have seen a solid week of accumulating snow with temps to single digits by the 20th. I used to wear Schnee's pacs and they didn't cut it...partly because of water absorption (leather) over a 10 day hunt. I made the switch to 1000gm rubber Lacrosse boots a few years ago and that solved things. No wet boots. Change outer socks once a day at lunch and interior of boot never gets damp.

Although I hunt what is probably very similar country (high valley, AK Range?), we likely do it quite a bit different. Because we have alternative means of recovery and multiple hunters in camp we cover ground far and wide with spot and stalk hunting. Rarely log less than 8 miles on the GPS in a day and 10+ is pretty normal.

Float hunters, jet boat hunters, fly-in hunters, swamp hunters, guys doing lots of late season calling... All will have different needs and opinions. I do have insulated 800 gm Lacross which are great boots for some of those applications, but I hate covering any kind of miles in them. To hot at any temp above 10F if I'm active at all. Only time I really wear rubber for extended periods (while moose hunting) is when it's raining, and if it's raining its obviously above freezing and I'm usually fine with un-insulated. Clear and frosting hard and I'm putting my (insulated) leathers on in the morning.

But the widely varying circumstances involved in moose hunting are why I said "opinions can and will vary".
 

Jimss

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I'd go uninsulated myself. Bring along some thinner and thicker socks and you ought to have it covered. If you are active and doing much hiking you likely won't need insulated boots. If you tend to sit a lot and it's cold you may want thicker/warmer socks?
 

AlaskaEd

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Insulated hip waders for me. I mostly hunt later season in wetland areas and that ground moisture sucks the warmth right out of your feet, especially on cold mornings when you are out before dawn. That's not an issue when I'm up in the hills glassing early season, however.
 
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