Is the 270 Win going the way of the 280, and slowly dying?

MeatMissile

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And the 270 is dying, hence the OP saying it is being offered less and less in new rifles.
That’s weird. I just looked at Tikka, Winchester, Remington, Ruger, Sako, and the 270 is offered in just about every configuration of big game rifle. Tikka chambers it in 10 different rifles, and that’s just the right handed ones.
 

hodgeman

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The 270 is going nowhere... modern powder and components make it better than ever.

My 145ELDX hand load with IMR4955 sends the bullet at 2975fps. It'll run with the 6.5PRC for much further than you'd want to shoot at anything.
 

BRTreedogs

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That’s weird. I just looked at Tikka, Winchester, Remington, Ruger, Sako, and the 270 is offered in just about every configuration of big game rifle. Tikka chambers it in 10 different rifles, and that’s just the right handed ones.
Don't blame me blame the OP I didn't do any research.
 

roosiebull

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Yes. The 270 is a great cartridge, but IMO it is a one trick pony. It drives 130 grain bullets fast and flat. If that is all you want, go for it. I think there are so many other more versatile choices out there. Maybe I'm wrong.

chris
I personally agree with this, but that shouldn’t be a big downfall, it does that one trick well and makes for a versatile rifle… I have had several 270’s, and none of them shot 150’s that well, but they all were very accurate with 130’s… I could easily get by and be content with a 270 for any big game hunting I would ever do with a rifle.

I understand why it’s losing popularity, but I hope it sticks around, I’m still a fan of the cartridge

I always wondered why the 270wsm never really got traction, may also be a one trick pony in factory configurations, but for someone who doesn’t want to dial and still have a pretty long reach with a mpbr sight in, it’s a seriously cool cartridge that is hell on anything in this country with the right projectile

I would buy a 270 over a 6.5prc today personally, because you can still find ammo and components for the 270, the prc is in too high of demand for my taste, and practically speaking, the prc offers no advantage to me personally over the 270

I have seen several elk killed with a 270, and only seen one rodeo with that cartridge, and it was a mature bull roosie that was shot too high… had nothing to do with the cartridge and didn’t go far, but lived longer than it should have, thought it was dead because it dumped and rolled off the back side of the ridge out of sight
 

LongWayAround

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It might be interesting to know how many rifles chambered in .270 Win are being sold relative to others in it's class. Whether it is offered as an option seems less important than how many new rifles are sold. Certainly, there are an abundance in service and will continue to be as long as ammunition and components are available.

I don't think the OP was suggesting that it has quit working or anything like that. However, if manufacturers begin finding that they sell fewer and fewer of them, it may become something of a relic.

There's an obvious marketing component to what rifles new shooters choose. Personally, I didn't grow up rifle hunting and as such I don't have any feelings of nostalgia for this cartridge or that. When I wanted a new rifle to fit between the options I had on hand, I passed over the .270.
 

5MilesBack

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2.6 million baby boomers are dying each year and the .270 is still here.
Holy crap.....that sounds like a real pandemic. No wonder Biden is importing so many folks......have to replace that kind of die off every year.

A few years ago I started experimenting with my .270 and 85gr TSX's.........at 3900+fps. Those are fun to shoot, very low recoil.........can stay on target with each shot and watch them hit. They're amazingly accurate at 300.
 
OP
Oncorhynchus.nerka

Oncorhynchus.nerka

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As long as I’m around the .270 will still be around. I don’t use it much right now but I can see a day coming when I lay down a pile of money and all I have is a custom Pre 64 M70 in 270 to finish my days with. It may not be the absolute best in every category but nothing has done me better from antelope to Alaska Yukon moose. I’ve had 5 to 6 at a time and am down to a couple special 270s now but they are good as they once were and are as good as I will ever need!
That Pre 64 M70 in 270 custom rifle sounds like it will be a thing of beauty!
 
OP
Oncorhynchus.nerka

Oncorhynchus.nerka

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I've got three .270 WCFs, including standard and featherweight pre-64 Model 70s I'm hoping some of the younger kids in my life are still using 50-60 years from now. All my hunting has been done in VA and WV, quite a bit on farms where longer shots are possible. I've been exploring the possibility of a trip out west and feel pretty good about what I've got when an elk guide says if you've got a .270 bring it. Several folks mentioned marketing of calibers, rifles, etc. I'm always I'm favor of anybody's reason to buy a new rifle so go for it, but the .270 will be around as long as there's hunting rifles.

And I'm a big fan of Jack O'Connor too!
I have never read any of Jack O'Connor's work, but I have heard his name mentioned often in the context of the 270. Of his books do you have any recommendations?
 
OP
Oncorhynchus.nerka

Oncorhynchus.nerka

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The 280 is more popular now then it ever was.

There are so many ‘06, 308 and 270 rifles out there they’ll never die. I can get 270 ammo cheaper then just about any other cartridge.

Once you get away from sites like Rokslide most hunters just go get a regular old caliber in a middle level rifle.
Ammo availability is a great reason for the 270!
 
OP
Oncorhynchus.nerka

Oncorhynchus.nerka

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CoStick

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It might be interesting to know how many rifles chambered in .270 Win are being sold relative to others in it's class. Whether it is offered as an option seems less important than how many new rifles are sold. Certainly, there are an abundance in service and will continue to be as long as ammunition and components are available.

I don't think the OP was suggesting that it has quit working or anything like that. However, if manufacturers begin finding that they sell fewer and fewer of them, it may become something of a relic.

There's an obvious marketing component to what rifles new shooters choose. Personally, I didn't grow up rifle hunting and as such I don't have any feelings of nostalgia for this cartridge or that. When I wanted a new rifle to fit between the options I had on hand, I passed over the .270.
I think a lot are being sold, obviously anecdotal but my workplace has a lot of new hunters based on new people moving to Colorado and meeting those of us who hunt. Almost all of them end up with a .270 or 30-06. They go to cabelas, bass pro, or Sheels and that is what they are pointed to.
 
OP
Oncorhynchus.nerka

Oncorhynchus.nerka

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That’s weird. I just looked at Tikka, Winchester, Remington, Ruger, Sako, and the 270 is offered in just about every configuration of big game rifle. Tikka chambers it in 10 different rifles, and that’s just the right handed ones.
I have never said that the 270 was not widely available. I am just noticing that it seems to be available in fewer rifles. Thus the thread is to see if people view this cartridge as being on the way out. For example Rugar American offers 6 versions of the Rugar American, only two chambered in 270. Another example is the Weatherby Mark V. While specific models are available in 270, a good number are not. Additionally, when CVA decided to break into the bolt-action centerfire rifles market with the Cascade, they elected not to chamber a 270 win. I watched a youtube video by Backfire, titled "The Hottest Rifle Cartridges of 2022", and in their list, the 270 Win never came up. By no means an exhaustive list, but I would think that a rifle's availability would slowly decrease if it were on the way out, thus my initial question.

I have a 270, and it has never let me down, I just think that on paper there is a small enough difference in some of the newer rifles that if I were going to buy my first gun I would go another way, despite my success with my current system. This difference is not enough for me to ditch my current setup.
 

MAP1

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Sportsmens Warehouse excluding out of stock. 270 still many flavors in comparison to its peers.
 

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I have never read any of Jack O'Connor's work, but I have heard his name mentioned often in the context of the 270. Of his books do you have any recommendations?

I have never read any of Jack O'Connor's work, but I have heard his name mentioned often in the context of the 270. Of his books do you have any recommendations?
My father wasn't a hunter by the time I came along. I fished ever since I was a kid. I was about 12 years old and found a copy of Outdoor Life, April 1965 (2 and a half years older than me) in a magazine rack at school. In that issue was O'Connor's story "The Ram and the Silver Bullet ". I was hooked and determined to hunt from then on. So, the compilations of his articles are where I'd recommend starting. I.have a copy of Hunting in the Rockies on my nightstand I've been re-reading. Obviously dated information technically, but interesting none the less. So, start with the compilations.
 

CorbLand

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It might be interesting to know how many rifles chambered in .270 Win are being sold relative to others in it's class. Whether it is offered as an option seems less important than how many new rifles are sold. Certainly, there are an abundance in service and will continue to be as long as ammunition and components are available.

I don't think the OP was suggesting that it has quit working or anything like that. However, if manufacturers begin finding that they sell fewer and fewer of them, it may become something of a relic.

There's an obvious marketing component to what rifles new shooters choose. Personally, I didn't grow up rifle hunting and as such I don't have any feelings of nostalgia for this cartridge or that. When I wanted a new rifle to fit between the options I had on hand, I passed over the .270.
I have worked at a gun counter part time for about 5 years. I haven’t sold many .270s in that time frame compared to other cartridges/calibers. Of the ones I have sold, I don’t think they have been purchased by anyone younger than mid thirties.

6.5s and 30s are still dominant in this area, with 7 mags coming in a close third.
 

ZAK13

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With the advent of newer powders & bullets, the 270 isn't going anywhere. I've taken multiple species of game with mine. It's my go to. I think people get hung up on the energy figures too much. 1500lbs. minimum for elk, 1000lbs. minimum for deer. Honestly I think, all one needs to do is concentrate on getting the bullet to the right spot and physics will take care of the rest. I shoot 110gr. Barnes TTSX out of mine and taken game out past the 1500lb & 1000lb minimum threshold, and guess what happened? I went home with game meat from the field. Before I got my 270, I used a 243, again, was told past 250-300 yards, its not enough, well tell that to the deer that fell to the 80gr GMX bullet, past the 300 yard marker. No the 270 isn't going anywhere, anytime soon, it's just evolving into a better cartridge now with the newer powders and bullets available.
 

Unclecroc

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I think it will find itself along with the 25-06 and 280, it will be loved by a cult following but not as widely chambered as these newer cartridges that offer better factory options for faster twist rates and long high bc bullets. Just my .02 cents.
 
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Oncorhynchus.nerka

Oncorhynchus.nerka

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With the advent of newer powders & bullets, the 270 isn't going anywhere. I've taken multiple species of game with mine. It's my go to. I think people get hung up on the energy figures too much. 1500lbs. minimum for elk, 1000lbs. minimum for deer. Honestly I think, all one needs to do is concentrate on getting the bullet to the right spot and physics will take care of the rest. I shoot 110gr. Barnes TTSX out of mine and taken game out past the 1500lb & 1000lb minimum threshold, and guess what happened? I went home with game meat from the field. Before I got my 270, I used a 243, again, was told past 250-300 yards, its not enough, well tell that to the deer that fell to the 80gr GMX bullet, past the 300 yard marker. No the 270 isn't going anywhere, anytime soon, it's just evolving into a better cartridge now with the newer powders and bullets available.
I was toying with using the 110 Barnes TTSX, at the moment I have been using the 129 gr LRX. How do you find that the 110 gr works on big game like elk? Does it pass through? Also how fast are you loading this round? On paper, Barnes suggests that you can obtain 3500 ft/s, that is fast!
 
OP
Oncorhynchus.nerka

Oncorhynchus.nerka

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My father wasn't a hunter by the time I came along. I fished ever since I was a kid. I was about 12 years old and found a copy of Outdoor Life, April 1965 (2 and a half years older than me) in a magazine rack at school. In that issue was O'Connor's story "The Ram and the Silver Bullet ". I was hooked and determined to hunt from then on. So, the compilations of his articles are where I'd recommend starting. I.have a copy of Hunting in the Rockies on my nightstand I've been re-reading. Obviously dated information technically, but interesting none the less. So, start with the compilations.
Thanks for the reply. I have been meaning to pick up one of O'Connor's books for my next read.
 
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