Joe Rogan 95lb Kong Bow

Kularrow

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I know this is a novelty but I bet a lot of people chase this weight now.
 

Maverick1

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Not too different than my setup. Similar draw length, about 1/2" different. Arrow shafts are a bit stiffer. The final draw weight is a little bit higher.
 

Rob5589

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In my younger days I shot an 80lb bow but, back then the eccentrics were closer to round compared to todays cams. Nowadays I would need both hands to pull that beast lol
 

OR Archer

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Let’s see how long it lasts. Those cams are pretty thin. See if they can hold up to the constant shooting at that weight
 

BAKPAKR

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Back in the early to mid 80s, I special-ordered a Golden Eagle that was in the mid-to-upper 80s. At that time, it sent Easton 2419s out pretty darn quick. Unfortunately, the double tear drop cable/string interface was a weak point. The tear drops pulled off twice and I wound up at the ER on one of those occasions, right before bow season.
 

Arctic Hunter

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I shot a PSE G-Force at 101# once....once....just to say I did it. The same guy who owned it also shot a 72# recurve (at his draw) and was a gap shooter. He would hold at full draw for probably 4 to 6 seconds. He was tougher than I was...

if you can handle it, that weight will absolutely smash.
 

Billy Goat

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Seems to me it's unfortunate that these archery influencers would be out there publicizing this kind of weight. Back in the day I don't remember ever reading what people actually shot. I think Tom Miranda had a heavy draw weight bow built a few times for Africa, but he rarely spoke about the draw weight.

It's something some people are definitely capable of, however I think it's more likely to lead to injuries and form issues than anything else.

I was shooting a self bow last weekend that is higher draw weight than any compound I have shot in a dozen years. I can do it, just realized I don't want to. That first draw is always a little loud, all the joints cracking anymore.

I'll say back in the day, I'm not talking 80's and early 90's. That is when guys chased some heavy weights, and the bows frequently didn't hold up. Several of the recurve shooters I know use to be compound sponsored shooters, but they couldn't keep bows together and gave it up. So maybe it's just fad's that come in waves. Here comes another round of it.
 
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Wrench

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Seems to me it's unfortunate that these archery influencers would be out there publicizing this kind of weight. Back in the day I don't remember ever reading what people actually shot. I think Tom Miranda had a heavy draw weight bow built a few times for Africa, but he rarely spoke about the draw weight.

It's something some people are definitely capable of, however I think it's more likely to lead to injuries and form issues than anything else.

I was shooting a self bow last weekend that is higher draw weight than any compound I have shot in a dozen years. I can do it, just realized I don't want to. That first draw is always a little loud, all the joints cracking anymore.

I'll say back in the day, I'm not talking 80's and early 90's. That is when guys chased some heavy weights, and the bows frequently didn't hold up. Several of the recurve shooters I know use to be compound sponsored shooters, but they couldn't keep bows together and gave it up. So maybe it's just fad's that come in waves. Here comes another round of it.

I had a Martin ML-10 70# longbow that I shot for a few years. Looking back, I'm curious if that had anything to do with the shoulder surgery I had far too early in my life.
 

Billy Goat

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I had a Martin ML-10 70# longbow that I shot for a few years. Looking back, I'm curious if that had anything to do with the shoulder surgery I had far too early in my life.

Anymore I view things like this, my knees are going to pick up so many pounds in their life, shoulders the same thing. Trying to keep an extra ten pounds off my mid line to keep my knees going a little longer. Same thing anymore with my bows.

Engine is going to make X-amount of horsepower in it's life. You can burn it up quick or take your time. My body is telling me the same thing, I hope I didn't already scorch my bearings.
 

5MilesBack

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Let’s see how long it lasts. Those cams are pretty thin. See if they can hold up to the constant shooting at that weight
My concern would be the limbs. Those are what seem to have trouble in higher weights from my experience. Of course I have almost 5" more draw length on Joe, that could also be a factor in the longevity of higher weight limbs.

95lbs at 28" draw equates to 75lbs at 32" draw in the same bow in regards to energy levels. My bow right now is set at 75lbs and 32 7/8" draw.
 
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wapitibob

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95lbs at 28" draw equates to 75lbs at 32" draw in the same bow in regards to energy levels. My bow right now is set at 75lbs and 32 7/8" draw.

It's not the energy level, it's the point of peak weight in the draw cycle and how the guy draws the bow. There are a whole lot of people drawing across their chest then they wonder why their shoulders come apart.
 

bsnedeker

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I've got a buddy who listens to too many podcasts who has decided next year he's going to an 80 lb bow after watching this video. This same dude had a complete passthrough on a bull elk with an expandable broadhead this year with his 70 lb bow...I just don't get it.

He also does the Cam Hanes anchor behind the back of his head thing which is a whole other deal.
 

WCB

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I remember watching some archery video of the "Gorilla Squad" must have been from the mid 90s....all the guys were shooting 100# or more. Tuning was definitely not popular with those guys...arrows were coming out sideways, hitting game sideways, and getting some pretty bad penetration due to it. Then it was either on the same video or just a show I watched around the same time. A lady had a complete pass through on a bison with lie a 45# bow.

No idea what the point of me typing that was but if the guy can pull it back, it is tuned well and they shoot it well who cares what they shoot. Now guys that are watching videos like this and following it are just that followers. I have two of the same bows one at 63# and the other topped out at 72# does my 72# kill better than my 63# bow no but it is what it is. I've shot mostly 70#s since I was a Senior in High School which was about 17 years ago...I'm 5'7" and have been between 160 and 170lbs since then...played college hockey and stayed fit since. I see no issues with a guy like Rogan shooting a heavy bow the guys is a lot stronger than me.
 

S.Clancy

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My bow maxes @ 82-83 lbs and I draw it like most guys draw 60, but I wouldn't want to go higher. I replace strings way more now than when I shot 70 lbs, I cant imagine shooting close to 100 lbs. Add to that the arrow cost and it wouldn't be worth it to me.
 

540-Virginian

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It's something some people are definitely capable of, however I think it's more likely to lead to injuries and form issues than anything else.

I think this already happens with 70# bows. Just because you can pull it back, doesn't mean you should. I love watching 'proper form' videos, but after a few seconds of a person pulling 70+ pounds back, they're hip thrusting like a high school senior at prom.

At least Joe Rogan doesn't have an inferiority complex...
 

Rob5589

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Those English long bows were 100+lb draw weights. And anthropologists can tell who the archers were by the deformities in their skeletons.
Wow, that's wild. Dud acknowledged in the video that the Kong bow isn't a "daily driver" due to the possible wear and tear on the body.
 

BBob

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I remember watching some archery video of the "Gorilla Squad" must have been from the mid 90s....all the guys were shooting 100# or more. Tuning was definitely not popular with those guys...arrows were coming out sideways, hitting game sideways, and getting some pretty bad penetration due to it. Then it was either on the same video or just a show I watched around the same time.
I don't know what "Gorilla Squad" you are referencing but if it was the PSE test team, I shot with several of those guys all the time in the 90's. I can tell you the guys I knew did not have poorly tuned bows and didn't have trouble killing things. Most of them shot 95 and on up to 110lbs. The rest of us weak guys shot in the 80-90lb range. When the IBO game came out west and got popular the bows started to get more efficient about the same time and the weights started to come down.
 
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