Kifaru Stoves

Nick Muche

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Mar 21, 2012
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So after reading all of the stuff on here, I am convinced that I should upgrade my current tent with either the Supertarp of the Mega... In any case, I plan to get a stove to go with it.

Is the para stove enough? It looks very small... It also looks like some serious cutting of wood will be neccesary to make it small enough to fit into it in order to burn!

If it is good enough, that is the route I will go, but for only a few more ounces you can get the Small Stove, would that be a better option?

How do they hold up after use and do they pack right back up into the small size they advertise easily after many uses?

How fast do they cool off after they have been in use? Meaning, if you have to move camp quick, do they cool off fast enough to make it happen or must you wait?

Do they make a mess in your pack with all the soot that will accumulate on the pipes and inside the stove?

Sorry about all the questions, but I just want to make sure I know what I am getting into.

Thanks!
 

lastcall

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Feb 25, 2012
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Nick, I think you asked questions a lot of us would like to know. I will be watching this one. thanks
 

Tim in Wa.

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Poulsbo Wa.
I've had the K stoves and like them but now I've switched over to Ed T's roll up T I stove.The short pcs. of wood required for the K stoves was a constant frustration although they would be easier to cook on.I've got a 16" roll up and its more air tight and lighter than a Kifaru Med.And I think it puts out as much heat.It is a little harder to assemble but not bad when you get used to it
Tim
 

Ross

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Feb 24, 2012
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Liberty Lake, WA
I asked many of these questions myself before my new small stove recently arrived. In speaking to Aron he recommend the small stove with my supertarp and annex purchase. From what I have observed I believe that was the correct choice.

The stove comes in a self contained case. The case is 9.5x13 and when the stove parts are placed back in the soft case it just under 3 inches deep.

All the parts are well laid out in the case and after use they quickly disassemble and easily fit back into the case. You can disassemble the stove in it's entirety in about 5 minutes and once the coals are out of the stove it cools in matter of minutes to be disassembled. All of any soot, debris etc remains in the self contained case.

The initial setup will take 20-30 minutes and just be sure to follow the very well written instructions the first time and you will be golden. The one item I was questioning was how would the stove pipe roll back up after use, but it most certainly did. I am very impressed with the stove and am looking forward to it's use this fall.

I will say Kifaru has tapped me out for any further new gear for the year but I am not complaining!
 

Lawnboi

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Mar 2, 2012
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North Central Wi
Iv got a parastove, it works but it is small. Perfect for my paratarp. If i had a super or a mega id likly go with a small or more likly a medium.
 

Backpack Hunter

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Feb 26, 2012
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Some wilderness area, somewhere
1. I think the parastove would be enough, but you will be feeding it quite a bit. As for cutting wood to fit, I don't. I break everything to fit into the stove, it is not as difficult as it sounds, very easy when you use a little leverage.

2. Personally yes I think the small would be a better choice as you wont have to stoke it as much. You might even take a look at the medium!

3. Mine have held up very well to use, and they easily disassemble and fit back into their container.

4. Cool off time is maybe 10min at most. I have never had to wait to move camp because of the stove.

5. No mess in my backpack, it all either goes into the stove container or on the backside of the pack.
 

Rizzy

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Apr 27, 2012
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Idaho
I have the para-stove and would recommend a small stove instead. The para goes through a lot of wood, but it is light and compact. If you get a small then you can use it when you upgrade to a Sawtooth;)
I bought mine used and store it in a USPS tyvek envelope and then put that in a large pullout in the grab it or a long pocket.
 

JG358

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Colorado
I'd go with the biggest stove they list for the shelter your getting, so... small:)
 
OP
Nick Muche

Nick Muche

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Thank you all for the information! It was exactly what I was looking for. The small stove is what I have decided on!
 

goodgrouper

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Mar 14, 2012
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Somers Montana
I have an 8 man tipi with a large stove. Haven't got to use it in cold weather yet. A couple weeks ago on a river camping trip we got caught in a thunderstorm and were soaked. I fired up the stove that night and had everything dry by bedtime. I'm thrilled with mine.
 
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Nick Muche

Nick Muche

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How long will the small stove burn dry wood before it all burns out. I realize there is no way it will burn all night while you are sleeping without several re-fills, just wondering how long in between each is required.
 
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
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Yakima, WA
I'd go with the Small stove. You will stoke it often, but that's the price of heated shelter. When you pack it up, take some fir boughs or whatever is handy and just brush out the pipe while it is laying flat and the inside stove surfaces. Now you have no soot to deal with and your stove is clean for the next set-up.
The stoves will go back in the pack they come with as easily the 100th time as they do the first.
Get a couple ziplocks to store the stove cable/keepers and the small and extra parts. Buy yourself a cheap pair of cotton gloves for assembly/disassembly and keep them with stove. This way you only have one pair of gloves black with soot and you reduce risk of cuts on the stove pipe during assembly/disassembly.
A small stove will not burn long into the night. In my experience with a small and a medium plan on 20-30 minutes of real warmth. If temps drop into the single digits you feel the temp drop immediately in the tipi when the stove is done. The upside is you go to sleep in a warm bag, warm, dry clothes and warmed body. No better way to start a restful night.
 

ken

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Feb 26, 2012
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ADK's
Nick- I've woke up a few times during the night and opened the stove to see nothing but black until I paw around in there with a stick. Usually that will bring up a few embers. This will sometimes be enough to get things going again if you have the right stuff laying next to the stove to toss in on said embers...read ultra flammable dry shavings, birch bark, spruce 'fir' etc....More than once Ive stirred the stove, tossed in the above and went back to sleep only to awake a while later to a roaring stove.

I cant give you an exact answer but I'll wager that sometimes you can bring her back after 1.5-2 hours.
 
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