Kimsha Hot Melt Glue for HIT Inserts

Bowhunter50

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Feb 25, 2015
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464
Hello all. I'm tossing around the idea of using the kimsha hot melt glue so I can remove inserts. The last few dozen axis arrows I've made I've had 2 or 3 per dozen where I inserted the brass HIT insert a little too deep and I've had to cut a little extra off the end so a broadhead or field point could screw in all the way. Obviously this is a little annoying. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong as I've followed dudley's youtube video on installing the inserts with the epoxy. I've tried a number of ways to remove the inserts with no luck.

I've heard good things about the Kimsha hot melt glue and it seems to come highly recommended from grizzly stick. It would be nice to have the ability to heat a field point and remove the insert if needed. I know other hot melts are brittle. Wondering what everyone's experience has been with the Kimsha or if you have any advice on what I'm doing wrong installing the HIT inserts that would be great too.

Here's a link:
 

GregB

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Aug 5, 2017
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I use Kimsha for my recuve arrows and haven't had any problems with it. For both hot melt and epoxy I wax the threads on a field point, screw it into the insert, wax the top portion of the insert and the part of the field point that goes into the shaft. For epoxy I'll install and stop short wipe away the epoxy that has pressed out and install fully, stand on end and let dry. For hot melt I just install, put the field point in some ice water to set the glue, remove field point and the ring of glue that has pressed out. Never liked the HIT tool, and never had a problem with insert depth doing this.
 

aachey

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Sep 30, 2019
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Just curious, when you install the insert are you then leaving it rest on a perfectly flat surface after you are done or not? I only ask because I did not my first set of axis and I had inserts move, not enough that I couldnt't thread heads in but they still shot fine lol. My next batch I just left them sit on a table and had no movement. That was using easton's epoxy.
 
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Bowhunter50

Bowhunter50

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Feb 25, 2015
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I use Kimsha for my recuve arrows and haven't had any problems with it. For both hot melt and epoxy I wax the threads on a field point, screw it into the insert, wax the top portion of the insert and the part of the field point that goes into the shaft. For epoxy I'll install and stop short wipe away the epoxy that has pressed out and install fully, stand on end and let dry. For hot melt I just install, put the field point in some ice water to set the glue, remove field point and the ring of glue that has pressed out. Never liked the HIT tool, and never had a problem with insert depth doing this.

Thanks this sounds like the perfect solution. Do you leave the field point in the whole 24 hour period for drying? Ever had any problems getting one out?


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Bowhunter50

Bowhunter50

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Feb 25, 2015
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Just curious, when you install the insert are you then leaving it rest on a perfectly flat surface after you are done or not? I only ask because I did not my first set of axis and I had inserts move, not enough that I couldnt't thread heads in but they still shot fine lol. My next batch I just left them sit on a table and had no movement. That was using easton's epoxy.

I left them on a table to dry. Not sure how it happened. Thinking back on it I’m wondering if it could have been inserting the HIT tool a second time to make sure it was in all the way. Maybe some pressure caused this? All I know is I’m going to use the waxed field point method mentioned above from now on. I’m not taking any chances ha


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GregB

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Thanks this sounds like the perfect solution. Do you leave the field point in the whole 24 hour period for drying? Ever had any problems getting one out?


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Leave it in 24 hours for epoxy, never had any problems removing the field point. The wax keeps it from bonding to the point.
 
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Bowhunter50

Bowhunter50

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Leave it in 24 hours for epoxy, never had any problems removing the field point. The wax keeps it from bonding to the point.

Awesome, thanks. I’m definitely doing this on my next batch of arrows. Sounds pretty much fool proof if you get the field point covered in wax.


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MattB

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Sep 29, 2012
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I use Kimsha for my recuve arrows and haven't had any problems with it. For both hot melt and epoxy I wax the threads on a field point, screw it into the insert, wax the top portion of the insert and the part of the field point that goes into the shaft. For epoxy I'll install and stop short wipe away the epoxy that has pressed out and install fully, stand on end and let dry. For hot melt I just install, put the field point in some ice water to set the glue, remove field point and the ring of glue that has pressed out. Never liked the HIT tool, and never had a problem with insert depth doing this.

I tried that method and my BH's did not seat properly so I had to reseat the HIT inserts with the tool (they were too shallow initially).
 
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Bowhunter50

Bowhunter50

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I tried that method and my BH's did not seat properly so I had to reseat the HIT inserts with the tool (they were too shallow initially).

Did you compare the field point threads to the broad heads? Wonder if they were vastly different from your broad heads.

I’ll compare my broad heads to field points before I use this method


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MattB

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Did you compare the field point threads to the broad heads? Wonder if they were vastly different from your broad heads.

I’ll compare my broad heads to field points before I use this method


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I didn't. Could be that one or the other was not within AMO spec. Perhaps should have played with a few different heads before re-seating.
 

camping1601

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Nov 13, 2014
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I've used different hot melts before and some inserts always come loose with time. Take your time when installing the hit's and make a test dud to ck seating depth before they dry.
 

Marble

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May 29, 2019
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The way I understand the reason for the exposure is the lack of outer lip on the arrow. The field point acts as the outer lip and it is because of this they want you to use the epoxy.

Do not insert the tool twice.

I use the chamfering tool twice, one time before I put the inswet in, and then after it's cured.

I also clean any excess glue on th. e inner wall of the arrow with a q tip, premeasured with small to bot push the insert in.

Lastly, arrows have to be on flat surface and not disturbed for 24 hours.
 
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Bowhunter50

Bowhunter50

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Thanks guys for all the input. I think I’ll stick with the epoxy and use a waxed field point that I’ve verified has similar threading to the broadheads I plan on using. This has been super helpful and restored my faith in my abilities to build my arrows myself.


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Twitch

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Sep 22, 2017
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I gave up using epoxy on my Axis shafts. Only use hot melt now. Occasionally I'll see one start to pull out a little when shooting tight compressed bales, but I just pull it, use a .204" copper gun cleaning brush to rough the inside of the shaft up, then re-install the insert with hot melt.

This way I can also salvage components when I blow out the nock end of a shaft.
 

Zac

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I had no luck with Kimsha, haven't had any issue with Bohning. Using the cool melt now.
 

GatorGar247

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Aug 18, 2020
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I prefer hot melt also. Nothing worse than chipping the end of an arrow and having to throw it away because you can't get the insert out. I switched to hexx 6mm so I can use regular inserts. I hate hits ,out serts, etc
 
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5MilesBack

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Feb 27, 2012
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I prefer hot melt also. Nothing worse than chipping the end of an arrow and having to throw it away because you can't get the insert out.
I always cut my arrows as short as I can get them and still have clearance with my rest. But I'm pretty sure I still have enough leeway room that I could easily cut off a small bit of the tip and make up for that difference with an extra washer or two between the arrow and the BH. But I've also never needed to do that before in the 14 years I've been using HIT arrows. I always use epoxy and I love the HIT's. I absolutely hate it when inserts pull out, never had that problem with good epoxy.
 

Bill V

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A method I've been using lately is screwing the HIT insert onto the broadhead or field point and then using hot melt to glue everything in along with our Impact Collar. Aron Snyder has been doing this with our .204 diameter reinforced HIT system for a couple of years now and put me onto it. Durability has been great. Advantages: you can shoot them as soon as they cool off, pull out strength is over 300 pounds using the hot melt we sell on our website now, which is the same as Kimsha, and if you want to change the arrow setup, put it in boiliing water for 15 seconds and pull it out with a pliers. The disadvatage is that you can't just unscrew the head to swap it our, but I can change 6 arrows from field points to broadheads in about 15 minutes with a Jetboil and a heat gun. I like that you can completely change your setup like insert weight and collar without damaging an arrow. You will also never have the problem of gluing in your HIT at the wrong depth. This link shows this method with our new Snyder Core system but you can also do this with a .204 or Deep Six HIT system.
 

Arctic Hunter

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Aug 6, 2016
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I used Walmart hotmelt on mine. Never had an issue.
I’ve used glue sticks from the craft section for years with almost no issues. Heat a field point or put the end of the shaft in boiling water and they come right out. I more than make up for the couple I’ve lost in several dozen arrows by being able to save the brass inserts from broken shafts.

The blue ferreltite from bohning works good too. It’s the low heat stuff. But it’s more expensive.
 
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