Last three books you've read?

ahhyut

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Jan 1, 2020
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Maine
Daniel Boone: The Life and Legend of an American Pioneer - great story, but dense read. I'd find another Boone biography.
Nine Mile Bridge by Helen Hamlin - a book about a game warden's wife when they lived in the North Maine Woods
That Wild Country by Mark Kenyon - he tries to walk as independent as he can, but makes some completely false and politically charged comments not related to the PL movement.
Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose - fast-moving account of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
Adding Boone and Dropping Undaunted Courage. Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History of the Mandan People is in progress and is great so far.
 

roosiebull

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Aug 23, 2014
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oregon coast
i'm not much of a book reader, I read one book on a long boat ride with a buddy from southern Or to SE AK, it was 7 days running 24hrs a day. I read "into the wild" on that ride, and that's a classic. another one I read and liked was "blue water gold rush" which was also good, but I think part of that is personally knowing a lot of the people in that book.

when I was a kid, I read "where the red fern grows" a bunch of times, that's a great classic.

my very favorite book I have read I literally couldn't put down, and that was "the river why" by Dave Duncan. that's an incredible book, and me not being able to put it down is saying a lot.... I have a really hard time keeping my own attention when reading books, but that book was very addicting.... there wasn't a boring page in that book. I was amazed how well the author was able to depict things in that book, and maintain that the whole book.... it's a must read for anyone who likes the outdoors.
 

ODB

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Mar 24, 2016
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953
i'm not much of a book reader, I read one book on a long boat ride with a buddy from southern Or to SE AK, it was 7 days running 24hrs a day. I read "into the wild" on that ride, and that's a classic. another one I read and liked was "blue water gold rush" which was also good, but I think part of that is personally knowing a lot of the people in that book.

when I was a kid, I read "where the red fern grows" a bunch of times, that's a great classic.

my very favorite book I have read I literally couldn't put down, and that was "the river why" by Dave Duncan. that's an incredible book, and me not being able to put it down is saying a lot.... I have a really hard time keeping my own attention when reading books, but that book was very addicting.... there wasn't a boring page in that book. I was amazed how well the author was able to depict things in that book, and maintain that the whole book.... it's a must read for anyone who likes the outdoors.
If you’ve read Into the Wild, you owe it to yourself to read The Wild Truth by Chris’s sister. It changed my view of Chris a great deal. I used to think I had nothing in common with him, that’s not the case at all.
 

woods89

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Sep 3, 2014
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181
Location
Southern MO Ozarks
I read quite a bit, so I'm not going to do the three last, but just a few that I've enjoyed over the last while.

Igen, by Jean Twenge. The effects of social media on the generation that had access to it all through their teens.
Digital Minimalism, by Cal Newport. How to put technology in its place, and not let it run your life.
The Making of a Country Lawyer, by Gerry Spence. Memoirs of a very successful trial lawyer.

Some book I've read long ago but just have to take out and reread occasionally,

Fate is the Hunter, by Ernest K. Gann. Flying experiences prior to and in the Civil Air Transport during WWII. A very eloquent writer.
When Breath Becomes Air, by Paul Kalanithi. About a neurosurgeon who is diagnosed with lung cancer at 36. Mostly about accepting terminal illness with peace. Heart wrenching.
The Hot Zone, by Richard Preston. About Ebola virus.
The Perfect Storm, by Sebastion Junger. About a fishing boat that goes down off Nova Scotia in the mother of all storms.
The Gathering Wind, by Gregory Freeman. About a replica of the H.M.S Bounty that sank in Hurricane Sandy, and the Coast Guard crews that rescued all but two of the crew alive.
 

roosiebull

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Aug 23, 2014
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345
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oregon coast
If you’ve read Into the Wild, you owe it to yourself to read The Wild Truth by Chris’s sister. It changed my view of Chris a great deal. I used to think I had nothing in common with him, that’s not the case at all.
I didn't know it existed, I appreciate that, I will buy it and read it, you certainly got my interest.
I do feel like I have a lot in common with Chris, just some huge differences in our upbringing. I could relate to his approach at life. I am an introvert, who likes solitude, and the biggest satisfactions in life generally happen when you step out of your comfort zone.

I am gonna get that book, because the one thing I didn't like was it seemed so incomplete, like the rest of the story wasn't there, and that part seems as important as the part that was told in "into the wild" I think "the wild truth" will bring the whole story together it sounds like.

it's timely too, I have been wanting to find some good books, because the dang internet gets a little monotonous in the forum world ;) TV is the same, I think a book at night will be a welcome change for a bit.

this one is pretty cool, more mellow than some, and I hope the newness doesn't wear off, haha.
 

ODB

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Mar 24, 2016
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953
I didn't know it existed, I appreciate that, I will buy it and read it, you certainly got my interest.
I do feel like I have a lot in common with Chris, just some huge differences in our upbringing. I could relate to his approach at life. I am an introvert, who likes solitude, and the biggest satisfactions in life generally happen when you step out of your comfort zone.

I am gonna get that book, because the one thing I didn't like was it seemed so incomplete, like the rest of the story wasn't there, and that part seems as important as the part that was told in "into the wild" I think "the wild truth" will bring the whole story together it sounds like.

it's timely too, I have been wanting to find some good books, because the dang internet gets a little monotonous in the forum world ;) TV is the same, I think a book at night will be a welcome change for a bit.

this one is pretty cool, more mellow than some, and I hope the newness doesn't wear off, haha.
You’ll like the book. It will complete a lot of the incompleteness of Into the Wild. Don’t expect a detailed description of his trip, the most important part of Chris’s story happened before he took the first step west.
 

AZmark

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Feb 28, 2020
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Location
Alpine AZ
I read Moby Dick a couple years ago. I'd read just a couple hrs at a time as that was all I could take due to how it read. It was a terrible read but was interesting. But due to that, I then read "In The Heart Of The Sea" which was about the incident that Moby Dick was based on. It was a good read and very interesting. Other than that have read a few hunting magazines. Oh, and I almost forgot, read a bunch of childrens books to my grandkids.....
 

coop22250

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Dec 19, 2016
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Palmer AK
Well I just used up my last new book on iTunes. Time to scroll through the Rokslide book store and pick a few out. Thanks for all the good suggestions.
 

805Bowhunter

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May 8, 2017
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All the Pretty Horses, Darker Than Night and Whitetail Tactics of the Pros. Watership Down is next up on my list, I read it once a year.
Have you read the other two McCarthy books in the Border Trilogy? Soooo good. Also, Watership Down is the first book I ever read that showed me that reading is awesome. I try to read it same as you, once a year. I cant wait to read that with my kids. Great book selection!
 

805Bowhunter

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May 8, 2017
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Civilized to Death by Christopher Ryan - pretty much everyone on this forum would love it, especially those of you who struggle to keep up with the "modern" society.

Under the Banner of Heaven by Krakauer - about the Mormons...I'll leave it at that.

Drop City by TC Boyle - its about a group of hippies in the early 70s as that whole movement was falling apart. They get kicked off of their land in northern california and decide to move to Alaska where they can be free and "one with nature." Its an outstanding read and a really good portrayal about why that whole "movement" was completely destined to fail from the beginning.

I highly recommend all three.
 

rcfireninja

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Jun 10, 2016
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165
Leadership Strategy and Tactics by Jocko

Tenth Legion by Tom Kelly

New Company Officer by Jason Hoevelmann


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

zog

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Nov 30, 2016
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Billings, Montana
I truly enjoyed reading this list, knowing it's compiled by like-minded people (hunters). Thank you for starting this thread. I admit when I saw the title I thought it was another silly topic for a hunting forum, but its really great.
 
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zog

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Nov 30, 2016
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Billings, Montana
For my contribution, my last three were

"Beneath a Scarlet Sky", a fictionally-written true account of a young Italian in WW2 who guided Jews over a Tyrolean pass to Switzerland., then became a spy for the Allies from within the Nazi SS. Its a true story written from a series of interviews with the real character sixty years hence; he had tried to leave the awful war memories behind him and never told his amazing story. The interviews had gaps that the old man could not remember, so the author filled in seamlessly with fiction. Can't put it down.

"At Home" by Bill Bryson, who takes you through each room of a house ,using that room to wind through the history of how our modern houses, furniture, utilities, and appliances came to be.

"Unfreedom of the Press" by Mark Levin. He is so brilliant.
 
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Milestone522

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Jul 7, 2018
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141
Location
NorCal
Ghosts of Gold Mountain by Gordon Chang (Chinese building the Transcontinental Railroad )

Top Gun by Dan Petersen (History of the Top Gun School founding during Vietnam)

Eruption: The untold story of Mount St. Helens by Steve Olson (1980 volcanic eruption and the victims)

All three were very good reads...
 

SouthernShooter

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Mar 15, 2020
Messages
21
Just got done with Joe Nobody Holding Their Own book 15. Before that I went back through John D McDonalds Travis McGee series. Probably the 5th time though it over the years.
 
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