Layering Up In Down Bag

tdot

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2014
Messages
694
just one other option maybe folks haven't considered

I carry a light 50 degree Apex quilt, replete with poncho hole. I carry it while hunting for glassing (or an emergency)- it weighs a svelte 12 oz. For glassing it adds a substantial amount of warmth, on it's own for sleeping it's not overly warm (have had it down to 40 a couple of times and wasn't terrible, had it down to freezing and it sucked! :D)

BUT added to another bag when backpacking, it adds quite a bit of warmth AND being synthetic and layered on the outside it helps keep down drier (and loftier)

anyways for 12 oz, small volume and multi-functional, I've been happy to pack it
This is basically the system I use now. Just need to find a better way to keep the top quilt from constantly slipping off. I used straps underneath, but it wasnt 100%
 

mtwarden

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
2,972
Location
Montana
the straps (two of them) on mine are flat elastic and do a pretty good job of staying put when in the role of top quilt
 

Blockcaver

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2012
Messages
1,103
Location
BC
I wear the appropriate amount of clothes at night to stay warm in a KUIU Super Down 15* bag. I've never had an issue with condensation inside the bag and always wake up with dry clothes on....and often went to bed with damp clothes. Appropriate varies from my merino/poly blend zip neck tees and boxers to long johns and wool socks, to adding the Microtex shirt and Attack pants. Finally to adding the Super Down Ultra hooded jacket and pants. If it is winter conditions I have a second jacket, a KUIU Spindrift I will wear, and stuff the Ultra Super Down jacket into the foot of the bag to keep my feet warm.

In the old days before Super Down, I did the same thing...but that in mostly in CO or very dry parts of the west. BC and other areas of Canada I hunt are often a lot damper.

When I hunted polar bears I took two 15* bags to nest the Super Down bag inside a Mt Hardware synthetic. Never needed the second bag due to having enough clothes on inside the Super Down bag. We did have heat in the tent but not very much at night relative to the -35* or lower temps we had in February.
 

Shraggs

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2014
Messages
496
Location
Zeeland, MI
Wow what a great and timely thread!

So glad you guys with experience are posting, this is a weak area for me.

Question, hers my scenario first.

Went to Dillion last week rifle, it was cold and we didn’t to tepee cause for three days we thought to long to find wood in snow. At below zero high I was nervous anyway having not slept that cold ever... so we got hotel.

I use hammock in September archery and EE revelation and revolt Quilt and under quilt. Both 20 degree 950T. EE recommended the two quilt system with top lighter rating and synthetic. We planned to use a tepee and stove and my Norah bivy. But I was leaving in couple of days. So they said use my under quilt on top - but I got it undersized. It’s 4’w by 5.5’ l. If I had to to do this, they couldn’t tell me what’s better, 1 put top quilt to bottom of borah bivy and rely on my chamberlain up top in my main quilt or beff up my feet with socks and put small top quilt over torso? I do carry Hidgeman 2mm neoprene socks used for river wading fishing, very warm.

I plan to remedy this next year, second question... this moisture Mgt makes sense now, what’s better one single -10 degree 950T quilt or two quilts with top being synthetic?

The one thing I’ll throw in is, I carry a second pair of base layers. Yep it’s a bit more weight but I’m pretty light. Once I’m squared away and eat I change into fresh merino. It totally warms me up and I sleep in that pair and thrown on outer layers in morning while the others hang. If nothing else it’s 8-12 oz if mental placebo, for me.
 
Last edited:

mtwarden

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
2,972
Location
Montana
can't help you on the hammock thing :)

as far as what's better one quilt or two; I think one of the main advantages of the two is that you have two bags to use during the year- say a 40 degree quilt/bag for warmer stuff, a 20 degree for cooler stuff and both in cold stuff

the other advantage is moisture mgt, this is probably more important on longer trips- 2-3 nights I rarely see any degradation of loft with a down quilt/bag; start getting more nights under your belt, the more likely you'll see it

the obvious advantage of a single quilt/bag is the weight savings, no matter how you slice- two quilts equally the rating of a single is going to be heavier

also insure you are very familiar w/ quilts as the temps plummet; I've gone back to a sleeping bag when I expect temps 0 or below- a minor draft at those temps is not fun- but I use quilts the rest of the time
 

mtwarden

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
2,972
Location
Montana
quilt would be wasted underneath sleeping on the ground imo, gets compressed- good pad(s) are a better option

in that particular case I’d try to layer the short one inside the full size quilt over my torso and beef up my foot insulation by other means
 

Where's Bruce?

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2013
Messages
4,353
A proper base layer should suffice, I will put a Woobie inside the bag if necessary and if temps really plummet to unexpected levels, throw my midlayers on top of the bag.
 
Top