Let’s see your method for tying in a peep

diderr33

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Jul 22, 2020
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19
I’ve been doing a variation of this for a couple years now. I did some testing this summer with my old way (tim gillingham method) and it did allow for some movement (1/16”) with a POI change of 5-6” at 60 with the amount of play possible. That’s with trying to slide the peep mind you. This season I wanted everything to be bomb proof. I stubbled on the Bowmar version a while back and decided to give it a try. Super impressed! Cannot move it at all. Make sure the peep size and height is perfect before you do this. Getting it out requires a needle and a fingernail clipper
 

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Mighty Mouse

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Jun 21, 2019
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I've been using the method shown in the video below: one continuous piece of serving with stop knots above/below plus a couple wraps around the body of the peep.

I recently stumbled across the method you're using on Hamskea's website and may try it next time I tie one in. That technique looks about as secure as you could possibly get.
 
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diderr33

diderr33

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Jul 22, 2020
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I’ve tried to do that method but don’t have enough practice with it. I think I’ll stick with this Hamskea/ Bowmar way for a very long time. It’s a ton of serving but if I loose a few feet a second to have an ultra secure peep I’ll be fine with that.
 

nettereo16

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Feb 7, 2017
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358
Location
NC
I do the single strand with the backserve tie-ins above and below (in the Levi video above).

That Bowmar method is pretty cool, never seen it before.

I don't think I have movement with my method but having it secure is good peace-of-mind.
I do take a little red sharpie and mark my string above/below peep so can see if it moved even a little.
 
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diderr33

diderr33

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2020
Messages
19
I do the single strand with the backserve tie-ins above and below (in the Levi video above).

That Bowmar method is pretty cool, never seen it before.

I don't think I have movement with my method but having it secure is good peace-of-mind.
I do take a little red sharpie and mark my string above/below peep so can see if it moved even a little.
I finally marked my peep with a sharpie and that’s how a caught it. It allowed enough movement when twisting the peep to move it a few inches POI at distance
 

Planopurist

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Jul 11, 2017
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pharmdbamafan

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Jun 21, 2020
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I probably should tie my in, but I actually just mark the string with a silver sharpie. It never moves, but I suppose a dry fire or good whack could make me regret it.
 

WhatToHunt

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Oct 17, 2019
Messages
99
Location
Wisconsin
Methods without wrapping the string above and below make the most sense to me because then the string twist is not altered and can be at its most natural state.
Ever have this method move up or down on the string after? I like the looks of this method and seems easy. I am unlucky enough to be putting on a new string today or tomorrow. I'm going to shoot 100 arrows through it, then tie in a peep.
 

sndmn11

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Mar 28, 2017
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Morrison, Colorado
Ever have this method move up or down on the string after? I like the looks of this method and seems easy. I am unlucky enough to be putting on a new string today or tomorrow. I'm going to shoot 100 arrows through it, then tie in a peep.

Not once you do the alternating half hitches in each side. Hamskea has a similar video that was posted on here as well.
 

sndmn11

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Excellent! That's what I was hoping. Thanks much.
That beginning constrictor knot is a great way to tie the peep in the string safely to shoot, check for alignment, and adjust. Then once things are pefect, nip that knot off and go through the whole sequence. Wax the bananas out of the tying material and the string. I find that I get a snugger and cleaner looking knot if I match the way the half hitches lay to the same way the peep lays....that is determined by whether you go outside the string and then through the triangle space, or inside the triangle and then around the string. In other words, what direction you tie the half hitches in. That will make sense once you see it in front of you.
 

WhatToHunt

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Oct 17, 2019
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Location
Wisconsin
That beginning constrictor knot is a great way to tie the peep in the string safely to shoot, check for alignment, and adjust. Then once things are pefect, nip that knot off and go through the whole sequence. Wax the bananas out of the tying material and the string. I find that I get a snugger and cleaner looking knot if I match the way the half hitches lay to the same way the peep lays....that is determined by whether you go outside the string and then through the triangle space, or inside the triangle and then around the string. In other words, what direction you tie the half hitches in. That will make sense once you see it in front of you.
Used this method today and I'm a fan. Simple and it works, the peep is not going to move on the string. Thanks again!
 

KevinClimbs

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Sep 3, 2015
Messages
43
Location
Seattle, WA
I went down this rabbit hole prior to season and ended up sticking with the Tim Gillingham method (
). Peep was very tight but I still mark my string with a sharpie to confirm no peep movement.
 
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