Lightweight Saddles?

sneek-ee

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2012
Messages
352
Location
Utah
So i'm going to get a new saddle here soon and I remembered reading Robby's article on the cordura saddles.
I thought i'd see if anyone has some feedback on these types of saddles vs. all leather traditional saddles.

I'm thinking it might be nice to try one out, but i'm curious on peoples personal experience with them before I decide.
Will they last as long as an all leather? How comfortable are they vs. leather? pro's and con's.

Here's a website that Robby recommended that I've been looking at a few options..
http://www.montanamountainhorse.com/lightweight-cordura-saddles/

Any feedback or advice would be great.. Thanks!
 

2rocky

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
1,047
Location
Nor Cal
If you are going to go lightweight, I'd look at endurance saddles, rather than a traditional western tree. These are made for folks and horses who cover a lot of ground often. Don't know any brands to steer you towards. This Saddle crossed my radar for Ride and tie..

http://reactorpanel.com/heraldic-announcement

A little extreme for me.

Here are some saddles some long-riders use...

http://www.thelongridersguild.com/Saddles.htm

Check out Outfitters Supply.

http://www.outfitterssupply.com/Western-amp-Endurance-Saddles/departments/9/

I'd try these when I get serious....

http://steelesaddle.com/
 
Last edited:

Drelk

Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2012
Messages
80
I rode a synthetic saddle last elk season. I really liked it. It was less than half the weight of my billy cook and very comfortable. Ill see if I can find the brand/model
 

Arrowslinger

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2012
Messages
587
Location
NorCal
If you do decide to buy one, find a used one...i cruise our local used saddle stores a couple times per month and find some crazy good deals. I've never used one, but have one in the barn that i might tack up and give a try.
 

jmez

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
6,072
Location
Piedmont, SD
Cordura doesn't hold up very well. The other problem with them is they don't fit a horse very well. That would be my main concern.

I would look into a McClellan, old Calvary saddle. They are light, made of leather and pretty much bombproof, it will outlive you. They are also very comfortable to ride.
 

chessie

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
34
A couple of those look like what those jockeys are gonna be riding in a few weeks at the derby. I think I would rather go bareback at that point. Cordura seems like a good option but I don't have any experience with anything but a roping saddle.
 

Hardstalk

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2012
Messages
1,094
Some seem more of a english/hunter/jumper niche on the saddles above.

I would stick with at least having a saddle horn for all around usage. Uphill, downhill horses tend to jump when crossing creeks or crevises that they can not see into. Or stumble when heading thru rocky country. I like having the horn for protection (self) incase they get a smell of something funny and get hot.
 

mtnwrunner

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2012
Messages
2,280
Location
Lowman, Idaho
One choice you always have is to go with a custom saddle specifically made for lightweight mountain riding. Here is a photo of my girlfriends that is 18 pounds and was made by Jim Gill. You'll pay for one but it is a lifetime investment. I'm not a big fan of synthetic materials on a horse. For some reason, I can't post the photo but i'll keep working on it...........

Randy
 

mtnwrunner

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2012
Messages
2,280
Location
Lowman, Idaho
One choice you always have is to go with a custom saddle specifically made for lightweight mountain riding. Here is a photo of my girlfriends that is 18 pounds and was made by Jim Gill. You'll pay for one but it is a lifetime investment. I'm not a big fan of synthetic materials on a horse. For some reason, I can't post the photo but i'll keep working on it...........

Randy

I was finally able to load a photo of the above lightweight mountain saddle.

Randy
 

Attachments

  • 015.jpg
    015.jpg
    43.7 KB · Views: 30

Hunt'nFish

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2013
Messages
1,109
Location
Beaverton, Oregon
IMO, If you lead a string, it's gotta have a horn. I like to run the lead rope over the horn and then sit on the rope.
That way I have both hands free for smoking my pipe or digging in the canvas horn bag for more beer.
If anything happens, it's always where I can grap it and all I have to do is stand up in the saddle and it comes free.

Other thoughts, if you use any Canvas meat bags on your riding saddle (like those Beckel makes),
these lightweight saddles might not be built to take that kinda weight.
And... if your thinking about light weight saddles, either your stock needs to be in better shape or you need to loose some weight.
We ride mules so don't have to worry about either. (wink)
But, I wouldn't have any problems with that last one mtnrunner posted though.
Hunt'nFish
 
Last edited:

BigAntlerGetter

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2012
Messages
484
Location
Gypsum, CO
honestly i prefer the leather yes heavier but iv seen those cordura saddles in dude strings that i have worked at. 1 once they sit in the sun a while they start to fade and iv seen them fall apart, specially with rain and all that, 2 iv seen them sore many horses i think they just move to much 3 if something goes wrong i love my western leather saddle if something goes wrong i have a horn to grab and can hang on better. i rode one for a day a while ago and after the first day of a 4 day ride i decided to ride bareback the remainder of the 4 day trip. this is my personal experience might have been the brand and im sure theres good ones out there but in my opinion you cannot beat the good old leather western saddle
 

Latest posts

Featured Video

Stats

Threads
189,554
Messages
1,971,821
Members
48,369
Latest member
Nathan3113
Top