LL Bean Boots

grfox92

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
168
Anyone ever wear the traditional 'LL Bean duck boots? are they really waterproof? Can you hunt out west in them or are they strictly a snow shoveling / going to the store type boot?

I've never worn them but I need a good AP winter boot and am wondering if I can use them multi purpose or should I look elsewhere?

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pete

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2014
Messages
129
The pair I used to own had no real support to speak of and a narrow heel, but they kept my feet dry. I wouldn’t take them west, but did use them on single day still hunts in the northeast. Just depends on your needs in a boot.
 

Missahba

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2019
Messages
100
Location
Michigan
If you can find a bean clone with thin liners they’re very handy versatile boots. I have a Lacrosse version. Fiberglass shank, not aggressive sole, and very thin liner. Wear them with an insole without liner in mild weather. Liner in snow - cold. Not sloppy like a sorel or loose pac boot. I wouldn’t carry a heavy backpack in them, but I have no problem hunting all day. Not for the steep, but do fine in the deep and the wet. Keep the leather treated with silicone and they’re plenty waterproof. I have a closet full of boots, and these are my #1 for hunting for a long time. I forget the model name, but Lacrosse made one called mountaineer. Bean and other brands have made similar.
 

jt4

Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2018
Messages
67
Look elsewhere for a hunting boot. I can get away with wearing them to a stand in the northeast, but if there was any type of actual hiking involved they wouldn't be my choice. FWIW, they aren't even my choice of boot for still hunting with a rifle in Maine.
 

Kenai_dtracker

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2019
Messages
38
Location
Falmouth, MA
I used to wear them all the time deer hunting in the northeast as I liked the lace up and leather over rubber boots. Only problem is that I got sick of the terrible tread design. I still hunt and track, and like to feel the ground, but the Bean boots have no tread and you'd slip a alot, I moved to the Lacross Alpha burly uninsulated for the the northeast but would never use rubber boots or bean boots for hunting in real steep terrain. No support really and too much heel slip.

Just sent my bean boots back for their 3rd restitching, as I do still wear them.
 
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grfox92

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
168
If you can find a bean clone with thin liners they’re very handy versatile boots. I have a Lacrosse version. Fiberglass shank, not aggressive sole, and very thin liner. Wear them with an insole without liner in mild weather. Liner in snow - cold. Not sloppy like a sorel or loose pac boot. I wouldn’t carry a heavy backpack in them, but I have no problem hunting all day. Not for the steep, but do fine in the deep and the wet. Keep the leather treated with silicone and they’re plenty waterproof. I have a closet full of boots, and these are my #1 for hunting for a long time. I forget the model name, but Lacrosse made one called mountaineer. Bean and other brands have made similar.
I took a look at the LaCrosse website. They have a similar boot called the Timber Top.
 
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grfox92

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
168
I used to wear them all the time deer hunting in the northeast as I liked the lace up and leather over rubber boots. Only problem is that I got sick of the terrible tread design. I still hunt and track, and like to feel the ground, but the Bean boots have no tread and you'd slip a alot, I moved to the Lacross Alpha burly uninsulated for the the northeast but would never use rubber boots or bean boots for hunting in real steep terrain. No support really and too much heel slip.

Just sent my bean boots back for their 3rd restitching, as I do still wear them.
Im in the northeast now but am moving to NW Wyoming next year. It doesnt sound like the Beans are a god option for me.
 

Brendan

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2013
Messages
2,259
Location
Boston, MA
So - I'm a lifelong Beans customer in one way or the other. Our family has a house in the next town over and has since the 70's, and they're only about 1:15 from my office. These used to be the "Go To" New England Hunting boot, but I've tried them on and just am not seeing it. I got a pair for $120 with the most insulation they offer - sizing was weird, and no way they'd be remotely stiff enough. I basically decided I'd do just as well as my insulated Lacrosse Boots I use for whitetail, and returned them.

I do want to find an insulated set of mountaineering boots, and eventually a better set of Pacs (Schnee's? Hoffman? Baffin? )
 

Mosby

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2015
Messages
677
Don't waste your money on LL Bean boots if your going to use them out west. Put that money towards a pair of Schnee's or Hoffman's pac boots with air bob soles.
 

twodogs

Newbie
Joined
Dec 2, 2015
Messages
9
Location
Montana
Back in the early 90's, I logged a hell of a lot of miles in the LL Bean boots while hunting midwest pheasants. I wouldn't own another pair of them. I used to have to tape the daylights out of my feet just to keep them from getting blisters on the heel and ball of my foot. I'd look just about anywhere else. Also, if you're planning to do any hill climbing, the tire tread pattern isn't very suited for that activity.
 

LASTINLINE

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2015
Messages
229
there waterproof up to where the leather is stiched to the rubber. even sealed they can be leaky so best to avoid the deep stuff. they have a unique feel and i do like them. they are different than any other boot thats for sure. you have to be selective as to there use. you can feel the ground through them but if you need ankle support or a dedicated boot for water snow id look elsewhere. a drizzly day hunting in a pine needle forest floor above 30 degrees for a few hours they shine. id also avoid the insulated versions and goretex. the liners arent removeable and those boots do better with getting the right sock thickness. your feet will sweat a bit in these so changing socks often and getting them dried out overnight is key to using them.
 
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