Meat Care, long trip with early success

Swamp Buck

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2012
Messages
12
Location
Wisconsin
I would like to hear some thoughts on meat care to avoid any problems. My hunting partners and I are planning our trip to CO for a two week hunt (Sept. 14-28). We will have coolers with ice at the truck and god willing we have some early success. What would you do to take nessasarry precautions to insure the meat stays. I don't think I would want to keep the meat in the coolers for more than say a week. Can I take the meat to a meat locker and just have them keep it and not process it (I would like to do that myself)? What is the best way to find a meat locker in the area that I hunt?
 

blb078

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2012
Messages
306
Location
Wentzville, MO & Port Charlotte, FL
I'll be in a similar situation. I drew my WY gen tag, and if I draw my region deer tag then I'll two animals to go after. IF I get one down and depending on how far into my 7 day hunt I am along w/temps. I will more than likely put the meat in a creek in trash bags. I'm not sure how long you can keep it in a creek though in mid Sept., maybe someone can give a little detail on that. If I get something early in the hunt then I may pack it out and see if a local meat locker will store it for a few days, unless I can keep the meat in a creek for 5 or 6 days w/o it going bad, but I wouldn't think it'd last that long, maybe a day or two????? Also when you quarter out the elk and are going to let it hang overnight or put in a creek, do you bone it out right away or leave the bone in while hanging/sitting overnight?
 
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Larry Bartlett

Senior Member
Rokslide Sponsor
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Feb 13, 2013
Messages
882
be careful with plug-in freezers on road hunts. A condition known as Cold Shortening will occur with meat that is allowed to freeze within the first 24 hours post-harvest. Muscle fibers must be allowed to go through glycolysis (post mortem blood chemistry converting sugars to lactic acid in the meat). If the meat is frozen before this process is complete (30-40 hours), muscle fibers contract (shorten) and become tough...the tenderizing process is then prevented for good.

The best way to handle your game meat is to reduce core temps to below 50 degrees within the first 24-30 hours, then storage should ensure meat stays clean, dry, and cool for at least a week before processing. During this time, the best storage temp is 34-38 degrees with air circulation to prevent mold and slime.
 

jmez

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
6,073
Location
Piedmont, SD
Just google meat processors in the area you are going to be hunting. There will be some around. Give them a call and see if they store meat. Most all of them will and it isn't an issue. Just figure out before you leave where you will take it.
 

darcytribe

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
923
I know a guy who lives about 40 min. drive from where I'll be hunting and I was thinking of bringing an old fridge with me and plugging it in at his place. If we get one (or two) down early we could truck it over there to stay cool for the remaining hunt time.
 
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