Metcalf load shelf

gchs4464

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2016
Messages
35
Is anyone else of the opinion that the load shelf on the metcalf rides to low? I’m seriously considering cutting it off and either sewing it high on the bag or cutting it out all together and adding two new buckles on the top of the frame so I can just run a load sling similar to what stone glacier has. What’s you guys opinion?


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gchs4464

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2016
Messages
35
Or maybe I’m just loading it wrong and need to play with it more. That’s very likely haha


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mmartiniii

Junior Member
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
19
Pictures? I feel like mine doesn’t ride too low.


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hjcruger

Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
50
Location
Vermont
I know exactly what you're talking about. I use my pack a bit differently than most. The lab I work for does sensory ecology work, and we often have to haul RV AGM batteries into the mountains to power playback speakers. I often haul 2 batteries at a time, which comes out to a little over 130 pounds. Because the load shelf sits so low, the bottom-inside edge of the lower battery falls right at the top of my sacrum. For the first time in many trips of hauling that load in the last couple years, I actually rubbed a fair amount of skin off my lower back because of how the load shelf rides. The load puts a lot of weight on the bottom third of the belt because of the ride height. I haven't tried it yet, but I believe you can change the ride height of the load shelf by tightening the straps running down the back of the frame and into the top of the shelf. This may not work if the load you are carrying is too wide for the strap adjustment, as you are essentially pulling some of the shelf up the back of the frame, but otherwise this might be a solution for you.
 

Sam01

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2015
Messages
32
Is anyone else of the opinion that the load shelf on the metcalf rides to low? I’m seriously considering cutting it off and either sewing it high on the bag or cutting it out all together and adding two new buckles on the top of the frame so I can just run a load sling similar to what stone glacier has. What’s you guys opinion?


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I know what you mean. First couple animals I thought the attachment points should be 1/3rd of the way up the frame. If you don’t take as much slack out it rides much better. I leave leas room the the quarter actually needs. It keeps it from sagging.
When I’m only hauling meat a short distance I throw it in the bag.


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Kevin Dill

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2014
Messages
1,757
I wouldn't necessarily say the Overload shelf is too low in general, but it might be a bit low for some people and how they load things. I do try to adjust the shelf so it loads as high as possible, but that's also because most loads eventually sag a little; just as most packs eventually slide down on the body a bit after some distance with a heavy load.

That said, I decided to solve any of those issues once and forever when it came to meat hauling with the MR frame. I got with Rugged Stitching (sponsor here) and he custom-crafted a superior load sling AND a trapezoidal meat transport bag for my frame. When hauling multiple meat loads I simply remove the main pack bag from the MR frame and replace it with the load sling. The trapezoidal (shape) bag prevents those nasty bottom-heavy and bulging meat loads which are common with boneless meat. The load rides higher and narrower with much better balance.

Finally, I'm not a fan of having too much weight too high on a pack carry. It's a good way to get over-balanced and injured when moving in rough terrain. No issue if hiking an improved trail though. I prefer the load's center of gravity to be between my high lumbar and mid thoracic region when carrying off-trail.



 

Ndstevens

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
173
Kevin, that's pretty sweet setup. I like the tapered meat bag design. I'm curious what material you guys chose to do the meat bag out of? Is it breathable or just functional?

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Kevin Dill

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2014
Messages
1,757
I believe the meat transport bag shown in my pictures is made of coated 500D Cordura, but can't be absolutely positive. I sealed all the seams to make it leakproof with bloody meat. It is NOT a meat hanging or storage bag. It's for packing out purposes only. When butchering, I put my deboned meat in normal breathable (white) meat bags. Then I slide the loaded bag of meat into the coated transport bag which then goes inside the load sling. The coated bag keeps my pack frame clean, and it carries the boneless meat correctly. When I get to my destination I pull the loaded (white) bag of meat out of the transport bag and hang it. I roll up the transport bag and secure it to the frame, then head back for the next load. When finished I wash out the transport bag and invert it to dry. Using this system vastly improves my efficiency and cleanliness.
 
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