Moccasins?

Slim Jim

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Jun 7, 2012
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Does anyone use moccasins for final stalk archery mule deer hunting? I know that most everyone slips on an extra pair of socks for final stalk but I feel a little more protected, just as stealthy, and only a few more ounces than socks. Just wondering why no one else seems to use these. I love mine, they slip on in a flash, then just pull the socks I have on over my pant bottoms
 

Rockchuck

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Mar 26, 2012
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I use moccasins for that exact purpose. I made them from some elk hide i had tanned. They work great with a dr schols gel insert. Without the insert i was getting jabbed too much by rocks, stickers, etc. Works great now though. Definately worth the weight for archery stalks for me!
 

PathFinder

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Front Range, Colorado
I've got some camo neoprene ones that I dug out of my dad's old hunting gear from back in the day. They are a huge improvement over socks. They keep my feet warm and are lots less painful to walk in the rough stuff in.
 

elkbowkevin

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Aug 24, 2012
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Western OR.
My cousin hunts in them all the time out bow hunting. He is an elk killing machine,,, and and 1/2 Indian.
 

Manosteel

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Alberta, Canada
I have 2 sets of moccasins and 1 set of mukluks (mukluks are 10+" moccasins) those in you link are neither, they use a harder leather than moccasins and canvese top with eyelets, which will affect the feel you get with the ground (which in IMHO is the major benefit of using moccasins) plus harder leather, especially in the sole will be a little louder. Best to get real moccasins made from moose or deer hide and use an insole inside for added comfort, fit and protection from sharp rocks.
 

Peter K

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Jan 26, 2014
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Oshkosh WI
I love the look of those Russell's! There made a half hour from my house in a small old building. I'm really thinking of having them make me a pair of their mountain boots for my upcoming hunt this fall. Get some boots made to fit my feet, they might cost more upfront, they should be the only pair I need for a long time.
 

arlenmyles

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May 25, 2022
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I hand make my own mocs and typically archery hunt in them exclusively. Im used to walking around with bear feet so I have no problem with the single bull hide sole. There is a company called Anxynt that makes some bad ass moccasins. The owner is a real stand up guy as well!
 

trapper.robi

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Aug 1, 2020
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Can you guys post some pictures of the moccasins you like to use? I'm thinking about making myself a pair and I'm trying to nail down the design. What are some pros/cons to consider design wise?
 

EdP

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Jun 18, 2020
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Southwest Va
Something like the Magellan Outdoors Shoreline Side Zip Wading Boots makes more sense to me than leather mocs. I have something similar that I use as a camp boot. Waterproof, warm, flexible but with enough sole thickness to prevent stone bruises.
 

arlenmyles

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May 25, 2022
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Can you guys post some pictures of the moccasins you like to use? I'm thinking about making myself a pair and I'm trying to nail down the design. What are some pros/cons to consider design wise?
Ok so first of all this is my 4th or 5th pair that I have made and it took me forever,(6-7 hours by hand). I understand that my moccasins are a little overkill and heavier then necessary but I find the process fun and therapeutic. Ill start by saying that these moccasins are incredibly comfortable, breathable, quite water resistant and REALLY quiet!

I started with a sole of bull hide cut out to just a tiny bit longer than my foot. I then cut the piece (I used elk hide) that goes over the top of my foot. I stitch that down with a saddle stitch, trim off the excess and then get the rear portion of the boot sized up. Once I saddle stitch that down to the sole I wrap it around my leg and trim off the excess. I then whip stitch the two pieces of leather together all the way up. For my lacing system I used horn and antler buttons. The lace is just a piece of leather lace with knots tied incrementally all the way up so all I have to do is loop it around the buttons and the boot is tight. If I was going to do it again I would have left a tab at the end of the heel to fold up and stitch, that would have made it so my heel patch I put on was part of the sole and not a seperate piece of leather.

There are lots of different ways to make moccasins, ANXYNT makes really cool ones for about $200 if youre change your mind about making your own.

Im going to make a lighter pair that are about ankle high to save weight and be much more realistic to bring backpacking. I walk around barefoot often and have really tough feet so I dont mind having a single piece leather sole. I made these for local bow hunting here in CA where Im close to home, no backpack, and where the terrain is somewhat forgiving. Let me know if you have any more questions about the tools or process.
 

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meta_gabbro

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Jun 22, 2020
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Since this is the lightweight section I'll throw a pitch in for Skinners. Socks with a flexible rubbery coating on the bottom and a thin foam insert for some extra protection if you need it. Smidge over 5oz for the pair, they make decent camp shoes, and they roll up to a negligible size in your pack. Available for around $50 on sale once or twice a year, but if the price stings there are a whole bunch of knockoffs floating around.
 

htlt_surfboards

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Jun 27, 2020
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Since this is the lightweight section I'll throw a pitch in for Skinners. Socks with a flexible rubbery coating on the bottom and a thin foam insert for some extra protection if you need it. Smidge over 5oz for the pair, they make decent camp shoes, and they roll up to a negligible size in your pack. Available for around $50 on sale once or twice a year, but if the price stings there are a whole bunch of knockoffs floating around.
I used the knock off versions of these this year elk hunting. They actually worked really well for stalking and camp shoes. That being said mine are significantly heavier than 5 oz for the pair. Just weighed them together and they came out to 13oz so if going this route might be worth the extra money for weight savings.
 

meta_gabbro

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Jun 22, 2020
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I used the knock off versions of these this year elk hunting. They actually worked really well for stalking and camp shoes. That being said mine are significantly heavier than 5 oz for the pair. Just weighed them together and they came out to 13oz so if going this route might be worth the extra money for weight savings.
I tried a pair of the knockoffs before trying the actual Skinners and found the same thing, the knockoffs were closer to 11oz and bulkier when rolled up, though they were tall enough to go past the ankle.

Another version I tried were Sand Socks, which are just short neoprene socks. They're lighter than Skinners (~3.5oz for a pair) but I found that they don't offer enough protection, at least not for vesicular basalt and cacti like we have in the Southwest.
 
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