Mules in the backcountry

Cole97

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What’s everybody’s method of backcountry hunts with mules/horses. I have a wilderness hunt and plan to ride in and camp and potentially move if need be a time or 2. The question is how does everyone leave their animals while in camp. Electric fence, hobbles, hobble to tree, tied up, if you leave a few in camp and ride 2??? What if you take just 1 animal does that change. I know each animal is different but just wondering in general. PS. Thanks to the ones that have already helped me.
 

Beendare

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We have used all of the above- E fence, Highline, hobbles.

It is a fair amount of work maintaining them in the back country

Be Careful high lining them in an area with a lot of standing dead timber. One night we had a big storm come through and seven trees came down near camp with one tree whacking one of our animals in the head while hi lined.
 
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Cole97

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Thanks for the feedback. I am leaning towards E-Fence in some type of forage hopefully. Other people’s experiences are best knowledge IMO as I have had some experience but not as much as many others. Thanks again.
 

WCB

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When I guided we high lined them at camp or had them in an electric fence. However, if no one was at a camp and animals were left there they were put back on the highline.

When actually out hunting we basically picketed them to a tree and they just eat around it. Hobbles from what I saw were about as useless as a poopy flavored lolly pop. One time most of the horses and mules got out of the electric fence the horse with the hobbles on was leading the pack across the drainage and onto the next hill side.
 
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Cole97

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Lol. Thanks for feedback. Ya one of our horses is the type that hobbles doesn’t faze him
 

rayporter

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i have been using electric since 89.

you have to have them used to it or they wont respect it. many mules will take a chance and try to duck under even if they have been behind it all summer. i took to putting hobbles on all of them for this reason.

also, i run 2 wires and one of the wires is low, real low to stop the ducking under. many times i dont use any insulators. just hay string if need be. i use ski rope winders to roll up the fence and it unrolls easy from the winder, too.
since i dont use insulators i just string the line through the bushes and ground it at the charger. i pick 2 trees about 4 ft apart to make a gate at the charger. it works for me.

around the truck i keep a couple of T posts and a hand full of step in stakes to make a fence.

if you have a kicker put 3 way hobbles on him. 3 ways will also keep him there in the morning if you have one that takes off.
 
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Cole97

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Thanks for your advice. I like that idea just have to make sure they are accustomed to it before fall. About to be in hot fence soon. Thanks again.
 

IdahoElk

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Hobbles staked to the ground near food(pasture) if we go back to camp mid day, tied to a tree if we're out all day and a high line at night.
 
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Cole97

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Thanks for reply. If you guys tie up to a tree with halter do you snub them up like in a pen at the house. I heard of a guy that left a long lead but I’d be scared if one boogered. Then again I know each animal is different.
 

def90

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Keep in mind the feed issues, in Colorado you need to bring in certified weed free feed. I think some people are switching to llamas for this reason, they can eat a wider variety of natural plants and are easier to take care of if you are not an experienced horse person.

CPW hunting with horses recommendations:
 

wyosteve

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cheyenne
I picket mine with one front foot on a chain and 25 ft rope. They can graze a little. Never had a problem.
 

Beendare

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If you guys tie up to a tree with halter do you snub them up
We do, less chance they get themselves in trouble.

Some areas they dont want you tying them to trees as they can do a lot of damage.

One year in the backcountry Wiminuche wilderness about 15 miles we had a guys horse go trotting by that went all the way back to the TH.

Ive had hobbled horses go a mile before we could track them down.

We had one hobbled horse go tumbling down a steep bank trying to get to the stream, it was a miracle he didn’t break his neck.

Now when my buddies wife says she wants to tag along on a hunt to watch the mules/ horses- Im a happy camper!
-
 

rayporter

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way back in the weminuche up against unit 76 i had a couple guys stop by looking for a couple of horses. show morgans they were. and they never did find them. i called a few months later to check.
 
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Cole97

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Oklahoma
Thanks again fellas for reply’s. My brother is trying to get llamas in next couple years. I appreciate everyone chiming in their ways. I know how we have done it in past and how I would like to do it but I’m a steward to the game and want all the info I can get. New or old I’ll take it and see if our mules and horses like one over the other
 

PNWGATOR

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Rathdrum, ID
While in camp we highline our stock. For feeding we use a portable Hotwire and always rotate animals through and not feed all at once. It’s a bit inconvenient, but there is always a ride available secured to the highline if necessary. While using animals during the hunt we simply tie them off to a tree. Tie them high, relatively short (can still drop head to sleep) and daisy chain the lead rope with the end locked off so they shouldn’t be able to pick at the rope and set themselves free.
 
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Cole97

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Oklahoma
Thanks for info. Hopefully there will be good grass forage still and be able to get to it and not have to pack hay. We shall see.
 

Brooks

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Mar 19, 2019
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New Mexico
That’s the biggest problem here in NM this year is the drought is so bad the grass in many parts of the state hasn’t grown at all. Not much for grass to graze this year !!
 
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