Need Advice on new Arrow Shafts

Timnterra

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I’m not necessarily new to archery hunting but I am new to being willing to spend money on archery equipment. I’ve been shooting Cabelas hunter extreme arrows made by Easton and I’m wanting to upgrade to a better arrow shaft. I’m shooting a Bowtech destroyer 350 with 30” draw and 65lb limbs. I have been using the Shuttle-T 100gr broadheads but I’m thinking about trying some of the more premium broadheads too. I don’t know how I’m supposed to pick an arrow or manufacturer I want to buy blank shafts and have them fletched at my local archery shop. I’ve been looking at the Gold tip hunter pro arrows but the only real reason is that they have a .001 straightness instead of .003 or .0025. I really appreciate any advice. What makes one brand of arrow better than another? Are some shafts Better with broadheads than others? Thanks
 

Marble

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Those will work. I like the easton axis but that's me.

Why not just get a bitzenberger, vanes and glue and do it yourself? Best thing I ever did. Now when I need to fix a vane issue, I just do it in front of the TV.

No waiting to go to the shop.

And you can usually buy a much larger variety of arrows than what your shop sells.

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RyanCmns

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Feb 27, 2018
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I run Easton axis and some black eagle both are good shafts the best thing for me was investing in IW inserts and collars it’s pricey but those have saved me a lot of money I was able to dig 1 arrow out of 5 separate logs before it was trashed made in US vs ??? I’d definitely buy a fletching setup


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Kularrow

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If you’re hunting whitetails from a treestand you’re not going to see a difference between .003 and .001 unles you’re Levi Morgan. You’re changing for the novelty of it.
 

Beendare

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If you’re hunting whitetails from a treestand you’re not going to see a difference between .003 and .001 unles you’re Levi Morgan. You’re changing for the novelty of it.
Agreed^

Spine consistency is #1 but it seems all of the major manufacturers are pretty good now.

I see guys buying super straight shafts but then skipping the crucial steps of squaring the ends of the shafts and running their BHs on a jig to check for concentricity- ie- straight.


Do those steps and you are golden with lesser shafts.

.
 
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Timnterra

Timnterra

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If you’re hunting whitetails from a treestand you’re not going to see a difference between .003 and .001 unles you’re Levi Morgan. You’re changing for the novelty of it.
I live in western South Dakota and hunt antelope and mule deer spot and stalk in the wide open rolling hills where you can go miles without seeing a tree. Though in my limited knowledge of arrows I really don’t have anything to judge and arrow on other than the weight consistency and the straightness. I assume the higher end arrows are weight and spine sorted into lots and that makes them better still? I have been looking at a DIY device that measures spine stiffness would I be better off rebuilding the shafts I have with new inserts vanes and sorting them by spine stiffness?
 

Billy Goat

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Most all of the .001 shafts are spine sorted. That can be more important that the straightness. I choose to spend the money on it. Generally $20-30 a dozen. With the other costs involved it's an increase of 15% in cost.

I can tell a difference with broadheads.


It's up to you if it's worth the time and effort to build them or order them. Several places online now that you can order exactly what you want, how you want.

I do like to nock tune my shafts before I fletch, but that's another step that takes time. Might or might not be worth it for you.


Most any of the higher quality shafts are pretty good anymore. The lighter the gpi, generally the less durable they are going to be. Components can help some, but a lighter shaft is generally more brittle. I have used some lightweight 300 and 250 spine shafts without any issues, but if I was looking towards a 400 spine I'd likely be more concerned about it.


Easton Axis, Black Eagle Carnivores, Rampage, or Spartan, Gold Tip Hunters are all good arrows in my experience.
 

Samdemarais

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I live in western South Dakota and hunt antelope and mule deer spot and stalk in the wide open rolling hills where you can go miles without seeing a tree. Though in my limited knowledge of arrows I really don’t have anything to judge and arrow on other than the weight consistency and the straightness. I assume the higher end arrows are weight and spine sorted into lots and that makes them better still? I have been looking at a DIY device that measures spine stiffness would I be better off rebuilding the shafts I have with new inserts vanes and sorting them by spine stiffness?
I would shoot black eagle or day six. Mostly cause the owners are cool dudes and they make a quality product
 

HbDane

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Sep 17, 2017
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Victory makes phenomenal arrows. I personally don't think you can find a better arrow but just like everything else what one person feels is the best another may not. I always opt for the straightess tolerances, only because I need all the help I can get even if it doesn't matter 😜
 

AroaniaPass

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The Greenwood footed shafts are top notch from all reports I have heard! I have a 33.25" draw and shoot a 64# recurve, so wood arrows stiff enough for me to shoot are like small logs, therefore I have never personally had the desire to go that route.
 

Mighty Mouse

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What makes one brand of arrow better than another?
Straightness tolerance is the most commonly used parameter to compare arrow quality, but IMO most archers (myself included) can't shoot well enough to see a noticeable difference in accuracy between a ±.001", ±.003", or ±.006" shaft. Not everyone would agree with that statement, and your results may vary depending on your shooting ability, maximum shot distance, arrow speed, and other aspects of your arrow build. Spinning a full length shaft prior to cutting then trimming the end that wobbles more (or just cutting equal amounts from both ends) can help improve the straightness of the finished arrow. Better straightness is never a bad thing, it just tends to make the arrow cost more and may not actually yield any noticeable benefit.

Consistent spine is arguably more important than straightness, but Black Eagle is the only manufacturer I know of that actually quantifies their spine consistency (±.010" spine deviation across a dozen). Nock tuning can help compensate for minor variations in spine.

Weight tolerance is irrelevant IMO. Most shafts are advertised to fall within a ±1-2 gr range, which is negligible compared to the total weight of the arrow.
 
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Timnterra

Timnterra

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Black Hills South Dakota
Straightness tolerance is the most commonly used parameter to compare arrow quality, but IMO most archers (myself included) can't shoot well enough to see a noticeable difference in accuracy between a ±.001", ±.003", or ±.006" shaft. Not everyone would agree with that statement, and your results may vary depending on your shooting ability, maximum shot distance, arrow speed, and other aspects of your arrow build. Spinning a full length shaft prior to cutting then trimming the end that wobbles more (or just cutting equal amounts from both ends) can help improve the straightness of the finished arrow. Better straightness is never a bad thing, it just tends to make the arrow cost more and may not actually yield any noticeable benefit.

Consistent spine is arguably more important than straightness, but Black Eagle is the only manufacturer I know of that actually quantifies their spine consistency (±.010" spine deviation across a dozen). Nock tuning can help compensate for minor variations in spine.

Weight tolerance is irrelevant IMO. Most shafts are advertised to fall within a ±1-2 gr range, which is negligible compared to the total weight of the arrow.
Thanks for the info there. I didn’t know that black eagle gave a listed spine consistency for the group of arrows. That makes it worth my while to buy their arrows over any other brand. I’m primarily a rifle hunter and I’m obsessed with accuracy in that regard I’ve spent many thousands of dollars to make sure that I have the most accurate rifle and ammunition possible. I was recently talking to the guy who owns the local archery shop and he related the two and it clicked for me. I had been thinking about the “ridiculous cost” of good arrows and components as compared to $.50 for a good bullet, but never mind that I shoot lapua brass and anneal it with an AMP annealer to squeeze every bit of precision out of the load while buying the cheapest arrows I can find and complaining about their ability to shoot good groups. All this to say I doubt I would ever regret buying arrows that cost $5 more each just to in know that I have removed as much margin for error as I can.
 

Mighty Mouse

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All this to say I doubt I would ever regret buying arrows that cost $5 more each just to in know that I have removed as much margin for error as I can.
I can empathize with that line of thinking and can't fault you for wanting the best arrows you can get. If you're set on ±.001" Black Eagle shafts, the only choice left to make is diameter.

If you're a tinkerer/perfectionist/DIY'er (from your previous post those labels seem applicable), you might consider buying a fletching jig. You could probably recoup a quarter to a third of the cost of a Bitzenburger jig with the savings realized by fletching your first dozen at home vs. having a shop do it. It is a bit of time commitment though.
 
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