Need (More) Guidance

Kopfjager

Junior Member
Joined
May 1, 2017
Messages
27
Location
Bakersfield, California
Well, here I am again, looking for some guidance! First off, let me say that I'm most appreciative for all the input I've received thus far in helping me pick a pack, as well as the deer zones to put in for here in California for my first year of hunting big game!

That being said, I am now looking to put together a sleep system, and it seems like this is even more convoluted than picking a pack! Bag or quilt? Floorless shelter or tent? Bivy bag? Woobie? Footprint? Nest? Vestibule? Which pad? It's all a wee bit overwhelming for this newbie! Anyways, I am 6'4" 260, with broad shoulders, a side/stomach sleeper, and I tend to sleep pretty warm (don't get cold too easily). I will be most likely scouting/hunting central/southern California in the early to mid season, and/or possibly the east side of the Sierras, if I happen to luck out and get an X-zone draw my first year.

I'm a buy once, cry once kind of guy, but I've had to lay out a bit of funds already for other gear, and I still need to get some binos, so budget is definitely a consideration here. What are your thoughts on what I would need to get a good night's sleep out in the field?

Thank you!
Nick
 

freebird134

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2012
Messages
508
Buy once, cry once would be nice, but I think a lot of these things have to be learned through trial and error. Lots of trying, lots of buying, lots of crying.

The one sure thing (for me) is that I like quilts. Once I made the switch, I'll never go back. Especially being a big guy and a warm sleeper, you'll probably enjoy the freedom of a quilt. Sleeping bags are so restrictive, especially for bigger guys.
 

ljalberta

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2015
Messages
729
Buy once, cry once would be nice, but I think a lot of these things have to be learned through trial and error. Lots of trying, lots of buying, lots of crying.

The one sure thing (for me) is that I like quilts. Once I made the switch, I'll never go back. Especially being a big guy and a warm sleeper, you'll probably enjoy the freedom of a quilt. Sleeping bags are so restrictive, especially for bigger guys.

Well said. I've found the very same to be true. Much of the sleep system comes down to preference and learning through trial and error. I also recently switched to quilts and can't see myself ever going back to a bag outside of winter.
 

freebird134

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2012
Messages
508
As a side sleeper myself, the other thing i really really value is a thick pad. I've used Thermarest neoair's since they came out (2009 i think). I recently switched to a Big Agnes q-core because it's even thicker. I like to be able to let a little air out of the pad so it's not rock hard, but on thinner pads my hips will hit the ground.
 

Gunnersdad49

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Messages
1,366
Location
Colorado
"Floorless shelter or tent? Bivy bag? Woobie? Footprint? Nest? Vestibule?"

If you want a stove at any point, go floorless. If that doesn't matter to you, or you expect to camp on rock or other surfaces that won't allow you to stake a shelter out, tents are pretty simple and light weight.

Unless you are going really far in, or expect great weather, a bivy bag (in my humble opinion) is more of a survival item. If you don't sleep well, you can't hunt well.

The Woobie is awesome, but for me, it is an add-on. I just got mine this spring, but plan on using it for glassing, lounging, and adding some warmth to a bag if it gets really cold out. Focus on a good bag or quilt first. Add the Woobie when funds permit.

Footprints are expensive. Save some money here and scrounge some Tyvek for a ground cloth at a construction site, or buy some off of Ebay. There was also a member here selling some off of a roll he bought. A search may turn that thread up.

A nest isn't really necessary unless you are worried about bugs. It will give you a floor and a screen. Get a shelter with a screen and a tyvek sheet for a floor and you can skip the nest. Add the nest later if you decide you need it.

If you have a small shelter, a vestibule is a great option for adding gear storage and a stove jack. If you get a bit larger shelter, you can skip it or add it later.
 
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K

Kopfjager

Junior Member
Joined
May 1, 2017
Messages
27
Location
Bakersfield, California
Well, I've spent many more hours reading through this subforum, and looking at different products, and I have narrowed things down some. For a bag/quilt, I think I'm pretty set on a 20 degree EE Revelation Apex in extra long/wide. For a sleeping pad, I'm thinking either a Synmat UL7, or Big Agnes Q-Core SLX, either in a 78x25. Any opinions on one over the other? Is the Big Agnes worth another $70?

The shelter is where things aren't quite as decided... Some that have piqued my interest are the Bear Paw Luna 4, Seek Outside Silvertip and Cimarron, My Trail Co Pyramid 3 (leaning heavily), and the Mountain Laurel Duomid Xl. At this point the shelter would house myself and gear, and possibly one other similarly sized individual and their gear. Any opinions on this?

Nick
 

Topo_trekker

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2016
Messages
708
Location
Northern Colorado
I have used a Synmat UL7 for the last 3 years and no problems. Im a side sleeper but have had to sleep on my back with this pad(arms go numb on my side). Not sure how much .5" in height is actually going to make with the Q-Core but I've thought about upgrading to the Big Agnes. The Q-Core is warmer but weighs 2oz. more.
 

Superkodiak38

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2016
Messages
687
Location
Maryland
I'm your size, look at the Big Agnes Lost Ranger long / wide. It has a 25" wide pad and it is more like a quilt than a bag as there is a sleeve that you slide the pad into. I also side sleep and toss and turn.
 

daddie63

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
899
Location
Ca.
I'm your size as well and tried a quilt for the first time last year. Worked better for me cause I sleep warm and move a bit. It's nice to slip a leg out to keep cool or wrap up to keep warm. I haven't figured out the pad dilemma out myself so no help there unfortunately.
 
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