Needing some guidance

OP
choosevelt

choosevelt

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2022
Messages
21
Location
NC/TN
See any marks like you are getting contact on the launcher?

Turning your vane out should have maximized your clearance, if you were still having issues there I think you need to figure out where else the vanes are contacting.
Only place I saw was hitting the upper part, but I’ll double check that tonight as well.
 

Mighty Mouse

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 21, 2019
Messages
1,571
Location
Oklahoma
If it were me, I'd probably rip that rubber pad off the bow. What were they thinking?
If you're using a dropaway rest that can't be locked/cocked in the up position when the bow is relaxed (i.e., many limb-driven rests), the rubber pad is nice for keeping your arrow from making noise when it bounces around on the shelf. It is annoying that the pad covers up the Berger hole though.
 

5MilesBack

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
13,861
Location
Colorado Springs
If you're using a dropaway rest that can't be locked/cocked in the up position when the bow is relaxed (i.e., many limb-driven rests), the rubber pad is nice for keeping your arrow from making noise when it bounces around on the shelf. It is annoying that the pad covers up the Berger hole though.
A small strip of moleskin works too. But I also can't imagine running around with my arrow bouncing around all over the shelf regardless. Put the moleskin on the shelf and then throw a finger around the arrow. Seems odd to have that rubber going up the riser, and appears to be the bulk of his problem.
 

Mighty Mouse

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 21, 2019
Messages
1,571
Location
Oklahoma
A small strip of moleskin works too. But I also can't imagine running around with my arrow bouncing around all over the shelf regardless. Put the moleskin on the shelf and then throw a finger around the arrow. Seems odd to have that rubber going up the riser, and appears to be the bulk of his problem.
I agree that Hoyt's built in rubber pad is unnecessary and they would be better off without it. For a lock-up style rest, the pad is completely useless and for other styles it's easy to add moleskin or a stick-on rubber arrow cradle. On my Mathews bows with limb-driven rests, I put Vaportrail "shag pads" on the shelf to help contain/quiet the arrow.

I still find it odd that the OP is getting vane contact on the shelf pad, but removing the pad wouldn't hurt anything and would give him about 1/16" to 1/8" more clearance.
 

Toby0415

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2021
Messages
29
Chances are your center shot is too low, move nocking point and rest up. That is not a binary cam system so it don’t have to be right down the middle. Bottom of the arrow through the top half of the Berger hole should clean it up


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Yobrevol

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2022
Messages
34
Powdering the arrows is the best method. I would try turning your nock in small increments until you find where it no longer contacts. The most likely culprit is hand torque. When you got your bow paper tuned did you shoot the bow through paper? At full draw glance up at your top cam the string should be coming off the track straight (in line).
 
OP
choosevelt

choosevelt

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2022
Messages
21
Location
NC/TN
When the bow was tuned, it was shooting bullet holes to answer @Yobrevol . I glanced up and the string isn't in line with the cam, bad enough that the serving is being moved by the edge of the cam. I took the bow to the local Hoyt shop, which has generally good reviews, they told me the cam and rest timing were good. I hold the bow with the majority of contact on the meaty portion of my hand below my thumb, with 2 fingers barely touching the front of the riser; don't hit my arm with the string. Am I just world class special and somehow managing to torque the absolute daylights out of the bow with minimal hand contact, or do I just need to go to another shop?
 
Last edited:

Billy Goat

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 6, 2018
Messages
6,478
Location
Shenandoah Valley
When the bow was tuned, it was shooting bullet holes to answer @Yobrevol . I glanced up and the string isn't in line with the cam, bad enough that the serving is being moved by the edge of the cam. I took the bow to the local Hoyt shop, which has generally good reviews, they told me the cam and rest timing were good. I hold the bow with the majority of contact on the meaty portion of my hand below my thumb, with 2 fingers barely touching the front of the riser; don't hit my arm with the string. Am I just world class special and somehow managing to torque the absolute daylights out of the bow with minimal hand contact, or do I just need to go to another shop?


That at full draw or at brace?


Lay a straight line on the side of the cam, see how far off the string it is @ nocking point.


Might be the centershot wasn't set correctly before it was yoke tuned.
 
OP
choosevelt

choosevelt

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2022
Messages
21
Location
NC/TN
This is the best picture at could get, at full draw the string seems like its off to the left relative to the cam. On the bottom cam, there's some serving wear, but its not obvious and I can't get a picture at full draw. I put a level against the cams and measured at the top, d loop, and bottom, all appears to be 1/4 inch away from the level. If its off at the top its just by a hair, I measured a few times but I'm not perfect. The serving wear on the top cam is much more significant than the bottom, and seems like the string is tighter on the left side of the cam.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_7654.jpeg
    IMG_7654.jpeg
    180.8 KB · Views: 6

Yobrevol

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2022
Messages
34
String off to the left suggests pressure going through the thumb side of the grip. I suggest having your knuckles and wrist at a 45-degree angle. Try and get it so that you can hold and anchor with the string tracking straight. It normally is a subtle re-adjustment don't do anything unnatural or unrepeatable.
 

Billy Goat

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 6, 2018
Messages
6,478
Location
Shenandoah Valley
This is the best picture at could get, at full draw the string seems like its off to the left relative to the cam. On the bottom cam, there's some serving wear, but its not obvious and I can't get a picture at full draw. I put a level against the cams and measured at the top, d loop, and bottom, all appears to be 1/4 inch away from the level. If its off at the top its just by a hair, I measured a few times but I'm not perfect. The serving wear on the top cam is much more significant than the bottom, and seems like the string is tighter on the left side of the cam.

For what I can see, and what it seems you are saying it sounds normal.

Wear on serving isn't abnormal, damage is.
 
OP
choosevelt

choosevelt

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2022
Messages
21
Location
NC/TN
For what I can see, and what it seems you are saying it sounds normal.

Wear on serving isn't abnormal, damage is.
Sounds like I'm just torquing it then, gonna give what Yobrevol said a go. Pretty embarrassed I'm just torquing it that badly, but still a good learning process.
 

5MilesBack

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
13,861
Location
Colorado Springs
Sounds like I'm just torquing it then, gonna give what Yobrevol said a go. Pretty embarrassed I'm just torquing it that badly, but still a good learning process.
Intentionally torque it the other way and see what it does.

I always test my bows and see what they do at 40 yards when I torque them one direction, and then the other. Optimally I always hope to still be within the bullseye. But I also always tune my bow with a more aggressive grip which I can replicate easily for most all conditions, whether shooting up or down, leaning around a tree, kneeling, exhausted, or whatever during an elk hunt.
 
OP
choosevelt

choosevelt

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2022
Messages
21
Location
NC/TN
Intentionally torque it the other way and see what it does.

I always test my bows and see what they do at 40 yards when I torque them one direction, and then the other. Optimally I always hope to still be within the bullseye. But I also always tune my bow with a more aggressive grip which I can replicate easily for most all conditions, whether shooting up or down, leaning around a tree, kneeling, exhausted, or whatever during an elk hunt.
It still hit the riser pad torquing left, right, thumb on/off, etc. However, I rotated all my arrows to have the cock vane facing out, and what I thought was them flying poorly when I tried this previously was the arrow I took out of the rotation. They are flying consistently enough that a slight bump of the sight when I'm not blown out from shooting so much should get me right back where I want to be. I would like to get to the point that I can tune myself, and torque tune, but I'm not there yet. I think having the vane up was just too tight unless I have perfect form, which I know for certain hanging in a saddle or hiking around all day I won't have. Another case of shooter, not the equipment; but a good learning experience of what to check and look for firsthand, so thank you guys for that.
 
Top