New Cot I tried this fall

robby denning

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Hi fellow stock users,
I tested a new lighter cot this year. Slept about 10 nights on it so far and really like it. My co-worker has one that has between 50 and 100 nights on it and is still looking good. Here's a quick video review on it. I accidentally call it an Easy Cot in the video but it's actually called an E-KOT (they truly are easy though as shown). You can visit the company at campingcot.com. They are not a Rokslide sponsor but seemed like a solid company (37 years in business) and figured you'd need to know in case you're looking for light tough cot. Let them know you saw it on Rokslide if you contact them. Here's the vid
[video=youtube_share;qifnizhjmfo]

Very economical at $89.95



  • 4 Tough spring steel galvanized legs.
  • Heavy Duty aluminum side-rail hinges (US Pat. 4,219,896)
  • Extra thick wall aluminum tubing.
  • Moss Green - 600 Denier Nylon
  • Weight Capacity 275 lbs.(26" x 74" x 8")
    Rugged, easy to carry, stow, setup, and take down.

They make a heavier version rated to 300 lbs and 350 lbs, too that use 1000 Denier, just see campingcot.com for more info

Post any questions. I'm subscribed so I'll get notified.
 
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Buckman

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Thanks for the video robby. Question I have is it stable when you lay on it. It seemed to rock back and forth pretty easy with just your hand on it. Also is it high enough off the ground to sit on and get your briches on?
 

dotman

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How stable is it and I'm assuming the legs can't rotate based on the video? It looked like it moved back and forth a little in the video but I'm guessing not enough for concern since you didn't say anything about that. Any issues you have found with it?
 

Where's Bruce?

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Not to be a smartass or anything but seven pounds seems like a lot of extra weight...what advantage does a 7" cot really provide? I use an EXPED UL9 LW with 3.5" of insulated comfort and don't see any advantage to hauling a cot...not even in snow...although my Tarptent has a nest. I just can't see a justification for the weight but assume there must be one that I am simply unaware of. Where and when is a cot necessary? I'd like to learn.
 

dotman

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Not to be a smartass or anything but seven pounds seems like a lot of extra weight...what advantage does a 7" cot really provide? I use an EXPED UL9 LW with 3.5" of insulated comfort and don't see any advantage to hauling a cot...not even in snow...although my Tarptent has a nest. I just can't see a justification for the weight but assume there must be one that I am simply unaware of. Where and when is a cot necessary? I'd like to learn.
A cot just adds another level of comfort and is easier to get up from. I used a cheap cot this year on a basecamp hunt and man it was nice not getting up off the ground. No one is going to pack in a 7lb cot on their back, at least most won't :). If you want a backpacking cot helinox and thermarest make a sub 3lb cot but it comes at a high price.

I also run the same pad as you and it is easier on the back when it is on a cot vs ground. It is never necessary it is a luxury :)
 

Eagle

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Not to be a smartass or anything but seven pounds seems like a lot of extra weight...what advantage does a 7" cot really provide? I use an EXPED UL9 LW with 3.5" of insulated comfort and don't see any advantage to hauling a cot...not even in snow...although my Tarptent has a nest. I just can't see a justification for the weight but assume there must be one that I am simply unaware of. Where and when is a cot necessary? I'd like to learn.
This is mainly geared to those that use stock while hunting in the backcountry. Seven pounds isn't much to a horse.
 

5MilesBack

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No one is going to pack in a 7lb cot on their back, at least most won't :).
I think it's funny, their website shows a woman with the cot strapped to the top of her pack.

Would be a good option if you're using horses. My base camp cot is 40"x84" and weighs quite a bit. Comfy though, with the 6 different layers of foam padding.
 
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robby denning

robby denning

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Hey,
the cot is very stable when you lay on it. No movement side to side at all. No rocking from top to bottom either- it's much more solid when weighted.

Yes, you can easily sit on it and keep your arse off the ground. It does rock a bit when you get up if you start rising too close to the edge, but easy to adjust to. "Almost" high enough to get your britches on. I'd start them on my feet then just stand up, unlike a tall cot where I can work my pants nearly to my crotch then stand. Good trade off though.

Where's Bruce, yes, cots are more of a luxury and make it a lot nicer than trying to rise from the ground like the dotman says. They also create usable space underneath to store gear whereas you can't when sleeping on the ground.

Im aware of lighter cots out there (with big price tags) but am using this one for the cost and the fact it's for horsepacking, and or/ATV camp or maybe for the guy who packs camp in and leaves it to come back to during the season. Most guys over 40 will chose a cot and rest better than sleeping on the ground. To get a sleeping pad we can really get rest on, it has to be thick, so it's bulky, even bulkier (although lighter) than the cot. I'll still sleep on the ground when backpacking more than a rough mile in.

5miles- Agreed and I'll still use my big cot in road camps as it's wider and higher and a little more comfy, but this is my new backcountry cot for horse or atv camps.

This is an economical tough option (and a five year guarantee if I'm wrong about durabilty) that I thought you guys might want to know about.
 

E Wa Hunter

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Robby, we have used two of those cotes for over 20 years they are great you will really enjoy those! The only thing issue we ran into was when they fell off a quad in Alaska and lost a leg.... Great product!!
 

Where's Bruce?

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Okay, that makes sense. I'm a no horse, no ATV hunter so I'll just continue to get off my pad slowly and while making grunting sounds like a bear. <g>
 

JP100

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Not to be a smartass or anything but seven pounds seems like a lot of extra weight...what advantage does a 7" cot really provide? I use an EXPED UL9 LW with 3.5" of insulated comfort and don't see any advantage to hauling a cot...not even in snow...although my Tarptent has a nest. I just can't see a justification for the weight but assume there must be one that I am simply unaware of. Where and when is a cot necessary? I'd like to learn.
Probably be nice in ya floor-less shelter when its been raining for 5 days and you are floating around your tent on your sleeping mat..........haha
 
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robby denning

robby denning

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Probably be nice in ya floor-less shelter when its been raining for 5 days and you are floating around your tent on your sleeping mat..........haha
Yes, cots have their place. For backpackers, I'd go with a good pad for as many years as possible and if I went with a cot, something much lighter than what I presented here. This E-kot is really for horse packers. I just loved the durability (like I said in the video, my co-workers has 50-100 nights on it and looks new) and the price can't be beat for what you get.

Hang out with enough guys over forty and you'll find many of us ust have a harder time sleeping on the ground so a good cot is essential to guys that have that problem.
 

GKPrice

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Yes, cots have their place. For backpackers, I'd go with a good pad for as many years as possible and if I went with a cot, something much lighter than what I presented here. This E-kot is really for horse packers. I just loved the durability (like I said in the video, my co-workers has 50-100 nights on it and looks new) and the price can't be beat for what you get.

Hang out with enough guys over forty and you'll find many of us ust have a harder time sleeping on the ground so a good cot is essential to guys that have that problem.
EKot looks every bit as comfortable as the Roll a Cot and easier to put together
 
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robby denning

robby denning

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GKPrice, I believe my other cot mentioned in in the video is a roll-a-cot. Been so long since I bought it, I couldn't remember the name and there is no tag on it. It's got aluminum frame poles that slide into each other, then you fold it in half. Blue mesh plastic-type material. Tough as nails but is harder to assemble and at least 3lbs heavier.
 

primitive

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I'm buying the Helinox lightweight cot (2 lb 6 oz).I will be backpacking it in 7 miles (3500 feet gain) on a Stones hunt. I am 51, shoulders a bit shot, and a good nights sleep vs not good is worth it to me. The Helinox with a 6 oz reflective pad (REI), and a center zip 20 deg Slick bag will be luxury (total 6 lb, my older Big Agnes sleep system was 5.68 lb.). That coupled with the Megatarp and 18 inch Smith stove will be bomb proof...and worth every ounce. The days of laying on a blue foam pad are long over. I will just have to increase my deadlifts, clean/jerks, and overhead squats! Thanks for the review Robby, that one might be a touch heavy for me!
 
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