New - Little Sibling Stove from Seek Outside

RockChucker30

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For the past few weeks I’ve been testing a new stove design from Seek Outside.





This stove is very different from anything I’ve used. Kevin tried to go truly UL with a wood burning stove with this project, and I think he managed that.





Weight of the prototype stove, damper, spark screen, three titanium stakes, and stuff sack is coming in at just under 10 ounces.

This stove is designed to provide heat in a shelter, and you can also cook on it—but you can’t do both at the same time. To boil water you would have to take the pipe off and take the stove outside the tent.

This seems like a good trade off to me because I normally use a wood burning stove for heat only. If I want to boil water I use the jetboil because it’s so much faster.

What do you guys think? Anyone see any potential problems or benefits? Features you'd want?
 

ken

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Interesting stove being that UL, but not having the ability to cook on in the tipi would rule it out. I cant think of any time that I'd NOT want to boil my water on the woodstove if I bothered to carry it in.

The ability to use your tipi stove to cook lunch while out hunting has some appeal also.
 

dotman

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Hmmm, pretty sure that isn't a new design. Saw it all over some forums a few years ago, a guy was making them in his garage or something but they only cost $140. Only issues I remember is that you better clear the ground really well or you will burn up the ground really easy.

Here is the one I was thinking of, a little different http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=76654

Let us know what you think after your testing, I think i'll stick to a cyclinder stove though.
 
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Aron Snyder

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Looks like it would need to be fed every two minutes and has the potential to burn some high dollar gear in short order!

It's been tested/done many times over the years and proven to be dangerous, but keep us posted either way.
 
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RockChucker30

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Hmmm, pretty sure that isn't a new design. Saw it all over some forums a few years ago, a guy was making them in his garage or something but they only cost $140. Only issues I remember is that you better clear the ground really well or you will burn up the ground really easy.

Here is the one I was thinking of, a little different http://zombiehunters.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=76654

Let us know what you think after your testing, I think i'll stick to a cyclinder stove though.
dotman,

You're right, the design isn't new. Henry Hopkins Sibley designed it somewhere around the 1850's or 1860's. Kevin used the original Sibley stove for his inspiration, thus the name Little Sibling. The new part is that this is new for SO, and it's titanium which I don't think has been done.
 
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RockChucker30

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Looks like it would need to be fed every two minutes and has the potential to burn some high dollar gear in short order!
In my testing it needs to be fed every 6 minutes undamped to keep full flame shooting up the pipe. It needs to be fed around every 10-11 minutes undamped to keep the fire hot but not rolling. It needs to be fed about every 10 minutes when damped to keep good flame and about every 15-20 minutes damped to keep the fire going.

This is very comparable to my Kifaru Small Stove, but the Kif Small weighs 2 lbs 6.6 oz in it's carry case whereas this weighs 10 oz.


It's been tested/done many times over the years and proven to be wasted weight/space and dangerous at the same time, but keep us posted either way.
As I said above, Henry Hopkins Sibley invented it somewhere around the 1850's or 1860's. The design was still in use until WWII, the 1940's. Hundreds of men used them for over 80 years. That qualifies as a time tested design in my mind.

If you clear the ground under and around the bottom of the stove there is no problem with flame getting out. Like anything else, caution and common sense are the best accident preventative.
 
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HellsCanyon

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I'm interested and would be much more likely to pack it along being only 10 oz! Not hard to get down to bare mineral soil where I usually hunt so I wouldn't be too wrried about flame creep. At this point though I don't even have a stove compatible shelter but still is nice to know this kind of stuff is out there!

Mike
 
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RockChucker30

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I'm interested and would be much more likely to pack it along being only 10 oz! Not hard to get down to bare mineral soil where I usually hunt so I wouldn't be too wrried about flame creep. At this point though I don't even have a stove compatible shelter but still is nice to know this kind of stuff is out there!

Mike
If this makes it to production, you can get one and it will give you an excuse to buy a new shelter!

Seriously, this thing won't be for everyone. If it's really cold then a box or cylinder stove would be better. If you want to cook on a woodburner then this probably isnt for you.

What I think it will do well is this: Cool to cold weather where you may or may not use a stove. I can take this and a 7' SS pipe and be at 1 3/4 lbs. A 7' ti pipe would get it down to under a pound and a half total weight.

I can add the jetboil and a full can of fuel for another 14 oz for a total on both stoves of 2lbs 10 oz. That's still almost a pound lighter than my current woodburner setup. The appeal in that is that I can have a fire if I want, I can still boil water really fast, and I'm picking up 14 oz over my current setup.
 

dotman

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Here is another option at just over 1 1/2lbs (can drop more weight with a pipe for a supertarp type shelter that doesn't need a 7ft pipe) that will probably heat better and kind of cook on, also what is the price point going to be? http://www.titaniumgoat.com/cstove.html

As a comparison, the ti-goat is a self contained stove that weighs 12oz, add the pipe wrap and 7ft pipe you get another 14oz (4.5ft pipe with pipe wrap is almost half of the 7ft pipes weight)

So for $239 I can get a stove that will heat well, is self contained and still only weight with pipe at around 1lb 6oz with a 4ft pipe. How is this going to be a better option do you think where I would pick it over a ti-goat? I'm assume due to materials used they will have similar price points. If I want better quality with a lite weight stove I would look at the Ed T stove or just use a kifaru instead of the ti-goat.
 
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dotman

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So is the 10oz weight with or with out the pipe because your weights have doubled or did I just read that wrong? Maybe edit the first weight to not mislead people into thinking th entire setup with pipe is 10oz since a 7ft ti pipe alone weights 10oz.
 
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RockChucker30

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Here is another option at just over 1 1/2lbs (can drop more weight with a pipe for a supertarp type shelter that doesn't need a 7ft pipe) that will probably heat better and kind of cook on, also what is the price point going to be? http://www.titaniumgoat.com/cstove.html

As a comparison, the ti-goat is a self contained stove that weighs 12oz, add the pipe wrap and 7ft pipe you get another 14oz (4.5ft pipe with pipe wrap is almost half of the 7ft pipes weight)

So for $239 I can get a stove that will heat well, is self contained and still only weight with pipe at around 1lb 6oz with a 4ft pipe. How is this going to be a better option do you think where I would pick it over a ti-goat? I'm assume due to materials used they will have similar price points. If I want better quality with a lite weight stove I would look at the Ed T stove or just use a kifaru instead of the ti-goat.
I don't have any experience with the ti-goat, so you'll have to fill me in on burn times, durability, fiddle factor on setup and takedown, etc, etc. I believe the Sibling will be a bit cheaper than that. As far as why it would be better....I can't answer that as I don't know the ti-goat stove.

But I look at it this way...I own 7 or 8 hunting rifles in different calibers even though I know I could make do with a Savage 30-06. People have their own tastes, and I believe that MORE options to choose from is better than LESS options to choose from. Competition is a good thing because we all benefit from it.

I had a supertarp with a 4 foot pipe. I now have a BCS with a 7' pipe. The extra weight to have walk in height and the added versatility is worth it to me.
 
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RockChucker30

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So is the 10oz weight with or with out the pipe because your weights have doubled or did I just read that wrong? Maybe edit the first weight to not mislead people into thinking th entire setup with pipe is 10oz since a 7ft ti pipe alone weights 10oz.
This is from my original post:

Weight of the prototype stove, damper, spark screen, three titanium stakes, and stuff sack is coming in at just under 10 ounces.
The pipe isn't included in that weight. Sorry if you didn't pick up on it, but I think it's clear enough that I'm not going to edit the original.

I'm going to be using the same pipe for whatever stove I'm using, so listing the weight of the stoves without pipe makes it easier to compare.
 

dotman

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Makes sense, i don't have a ti-goat, just showing people that they can get a cylinder stove that only weighs 2oz more and use it to cook on. Thannks for the clarification, I always see stoves shown with a pipe weigh and made an assumption. I thought you might be interested in the ti- goat since then you would beable to drop the weight of your jetboil.

This stove design does look dangerous but would like to hear how long term testing goes.
 

ken

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I didn't catch the fact that there is no bottom on this stove. There is no way I'd use it in a tipi/tarp around here. I'd have everything on fire with our soils.

I have to agree with dotman, there are better options out there currently that allow for cooking/boiling. Dropping the Jetboil from your loadout and living with the extra couple of minutes of boil time would be the approach I'd take. YMMV.

You ceratinly are correct when you talk about options and trade-offs. We are all different in terms of what we look for in gear and what we need/want our gear to do.
 
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RockChucker30

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Makes sense, i don't have a ti-goat, just showing people that they can get a cylinder stove that only weighs 2oz more and use it to cook on. Thannks for the clarification, I always see stoves shown with a pipe weigh and made an assumption. I thought you might be interested in the ti- goat since then you would beable to drop the weight of your jetboil.
I appreciate the input! To be honest, I don't really like cooking on a wood stove, and when I take the Kif Small I normally take an alky stove or the jetboil along for boiling duties. The reason is that I'm really impatient.

My jetboil will boil 2 cups of water in 2-3 minutes. Then I dump it in a MH freezedried bag for 7-10 minutes. I usually open the bag and stir and let it cool for 2-4 minutes after that before chowing down. Total time is around 17 minutes on the outside before I'm eating.

On a woodburner, it takes me probably 10 minutes to get the stove hot enough to cook. Then it takes 8-10 minutes to boil two cups, then 7-10 minutes in the MH bag, then 2-4 minutes stirring and cool down. Total is around 34 minutes give or take before I'm eating.

With this stove I'm eating faster in a warm tent and dropping nearly a pound from my current setup.


This stove design does look dangerous but would like to hear how long term testing goes.
What makes you say that? The only fears I had were it turning over or flame creep from the bottom. You stake the bottom of the stove down so it won't turn over.

Flame creep- well, it's a concern. You need to set it up on bare earth or dig until you've got bare earth. I haven't been getting any flame creep.

 

HellsCanyon

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I didn't catch the fact that there is no bottom on this stove. There is no way I'd use it in a tipi/tarp around here. I'd have everything on fire with our soils.

I have to agree with dotman, there are better options out there currently that allow for cooking/boiling. Dropping the Jetboil from your loadout and living with the extra couple of minutes of boil time would be the approach I'd take. YMMV.

You ceratinly are correct when you talk about options and trade-offs. We are all different in terms of what we look for in gear and what we need/want our gear to do.
I don't have this stove but i can tell you that any bare mineral soil with not induce flame creep. I know that you'll have to use some caution about not setting it up on some tree roots or on a layer of duff and litter. Some areas I've been have had a litter layer of 6-10" (coniferous forest). Going to take a little more work but don't think its impossible.

Mike
 

Aron Snyder

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I think people in Colorado are worried about flame creep because half the state is in flames:)....joking and serious at the same time!

My doubts are coming from my own experience, as I've tried/tested something like this and did not go forward with the "non-bottom" type design. Everyone is different, so I will interested to see what you come up with after long term testing.
 
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RockChucker30

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Aron,

Those fires are no joke! Stove testing would be difficult in CO right now since the entire state is under a fire ban. Hope you guys get some rain soon.
 

dotman

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I have to agree, when I finally decide on my stove it will be used mainly for heat and hot drinks and thr pocket rock will boil meal water, i'm not waiting either. Because of just wanting heat I probably go with either the ti-goat or ed t but i'm in no rush and putting this purchase off till next year.
 
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