New stone glacier pack?

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thinhorn_AK

thinhorn_AK

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a little common sense and experience with similar products go a long ways.... never claimed to be an expert of any type. that was no more of an expert reply than yours is a typical DB internet forum reply.... carry on

Feel free to put me on ignore, I’m going to do that to you. We can save each other the drama.
 

mtwarden

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Oct 18, 2016
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Montana
just one small clarification- it's still an external frame pack (same frame as the Krux), the bag is simply directly (and assumed permanently?) attached to the frame

not an internal frame pack

also I agree this pack definitely fills a niche, but not all :)
 

Kurt

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As has been mentioned by some of the previous comments, the Terminus is a purpose-built pack for alpine hunting, it is a niche pack. I did not design it to replace or even compete with the current Evo or Xcurve frame as it does not have the same features. For those who want one pack to do it all, carry quarters, flexibility of volume, ability to change bags, the Xcurve an Evo are the best choice. For those that have a tight gear list, looking to shave weight, and are only going to be packing boned animals, the Terminus could be a good option. Designing the Terminus has been a pet project of mine for the last year, really designed around specific alpine style hunts I do every year. Primary hunts that would fit this pack would be sheep, goat, and high country mule deer.

The frame has the same construction as our Evo and Xcurve external frames, except the bag is sewn directly to the frame. However, we have called it an “internal” in hopes to clarify that the bag is permanently attached to the frame and cannot be swapped out like our other frame designs.

The internal load cell is the same general dimensions of our current load cell bag, however it is taller to allow more flexibility with volume. The very bottom of the load cell is tapered from front to back, leaving more pack volume at the bottom of the pack for sleeping bag type gear to go in the bottom of the pack. The load can be adjusted to ride higher on the frame with lower volume meat loads, you simply do this by loading gear in the bottom of the pack before loading the meat into the cell to get the ride height you need. The load cell is waterproof with drain holes to the outside of the pack to keep blood from pooling inside the pack. While you can load boned meat directly into the cell, we have found best practices are to use a load cell bag inside as it helps with managing meat, particularly in situations like multi-day pack outs in the wilderness where you need to sling the meat in a tree every night.
Best,
Kurt
 

BoltActionBrotherhood

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Feb 5, 2021
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279
Location
Nor Cal
As has been mentioned by some of the previous comments, the Terminus is a purpose-built pack for alpine hunting, it is a niche pack. I did not design it to replace or even compete with the current Evo or Xcurve frame as it does not have the same features. For those who want one pack to do it all, carry quarters, flexibility of volume, ability to change bags, the Xcurve an Evo are the best choice. For those that have a tight gear list, looking to shave weight, and are only going to be packing boned animals, the Terminus could be a good option. Designing the Terminus has been a pet project of mine for the last year, really designed around specific alpine style hunts I do every year. Primary hunts that would fit this pack would be sheep, goat, and high country mule deer.

The frame has the same construction as our Evo and Xcurve external frames, except the bag is sewn directly to the frame. However, we have called it an “internal” in hopes to clarify that the bag is permanently attached to the frame and cannot be swapped out like our other frame designs.

The internal load cell is the same general dimensions of our current load cell bag, however it is taller to allow more flexibility with volume. The very bottom of the load cell is tapered from front to back, leaving more pack volume at the bottom of the pack for sleeping bag type gear to go in the bottom of the pack. The load can be adjusted to ride higher on the frame with lower volume meat loads, you simply do this by loading gear in the bottom of the pack before loading the meat into the cell to get the ride height you need. The load cell is waterproof with drain holes to the outside of the pack to keep blood from pooling inside the pack. While you can load boned meat directly into the cell, we have found best practices are to use a load cell bag inside as it helps with managing meat, particularly in situations like multi-day pack outs in the wilderness where you need to sling the meat in a tree every night.
Best,
Kurt

Kurt, the new approach 2800 looks to be the perfect day pack. I have the 1800 and I love it, but I just needed a little more room for most of my hunts. (I hunt a lot with my 3 year old, so I need extra room for snacks etc.) and also love that you put the zipper in front of the buckle on this one!
I think it was a smart room to replace the 1800 with the 2800. Once I am able to sell the 1800 I’ll be picking the 2800 up!
 

Peak a Week

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Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
48
Kurt,

This is slightly off-topic, but while we are discussing SG packs, would you mind commenting on the rifle you carried in your pack on the recent Meateater episode? You had your rifle stashed vertically with the stock up between the shoulder strap pads on the inside of the frame. I also noticed you had a thermarest pad placed in the lumbar of your pack while carrying the rifle. Is this a typical carry method of yours, or specific to that rifle/situation? What was the muzzle of the gun resting on? I ask because it appears this would be prohibitively uncomfortable (at least it would be for me with my Sky 6900), however I trust you packed it this way for a very specific reason.

Thanks and congratulations on the sale of SG.
 

Altiholic

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Jan 2, 2017
Messages
13
Dont want to side track this thread but the comments on the niche that this fills is near and dear to me. I've been customizing packs for several years to try to get to something that works better than commercially available options. My latest attempt uses a seek outside pack frame and a variety of modified dyneema roll top dry bags. No frills but super adaptable, incredibly light and waterproof. Meat shelf and swappable bags so as many cubic inches as I want. At about 2 ounces per 3000 cubic inches for the bags it's great to be able to carry several bags on a trip with essentially no weight penalty, particularly when multiple meat packing trips are necessary (takes me at least couple trips to pack out a whole goat by myself depending on terrain). Get to the drop point, unclip the entire bag rather than unpacking individual meat bags and head up for another trip. I love the simplicity and light weight of the setup.

I have about every pack there is and really hate zippers and endless pockets. Cool to see another truly lightweight option with the terminus and would love try one out and may end up with one in my continual attempt to find a pack that carries itself. My current setup is lighter but probably a bit less user friendly. Look forward to some reports and photos.
 

robertchutch

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Apr 13, 2021
Messages
106
Im thinking this is gonna be my next pack. The extra space and weight savings over a badlands 2200 seem insane
 

schmalzy

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Joined
Oct 1, 2014
Messages
678
Terminus just showed up at the house. Definitely light. I’ll get some pictures up when I get a chance to put some weight in it and get it dialed in.


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schmalzy

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Oct 1, 2014
Messages
678
66f7b14ad69a41a2b1939a11fd018979.jpg



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Kurt

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Oct 10, 2012
Messages
164
Peak a Week, I was packing a little single shot 22 Steve asked me to carry. He wanted to be able to take a grouse for some camp cooking if we could find a bird. It was one of those real short kid type 22, so it didn't stick down below the pack. We didn't see any sign of birds the first few days, so the rifle stayed at the trailhead. I never carry my hunting rifle like that, always on the side of the pack.
The Thermarest pad was small piece of a Ridgecrest pad that I carry to sit on while glassing, a nice addition in the snow.

Mtwarden is correct, the stays are straight in the Terminus
 

prm

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Mar 31, 2017
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No. VA
66f7b14ad69a41a2b1939a11fd018979.jpg



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I‘d be interested in how well in cinches down when carrying minimal day hunt gear (kill kit, water purifier, first aid, puffy, foam seat pad). Lots of pics online with it full.
 

schmalzy

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Oct 1, 2014
Messages
678
I‘d be interested in how well in cinches down when carrying minimal day hunt gear (kill kit, water purifier, first aid, puffy, foam seat pad). Lots of pics online with it full.

Cinches down extremely well. I’ll get a picture up of it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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