New to Western Hunt - Training Plans?

Bdouble

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2019
Messages
32
Can anyone point me in the direction of a solid beginner / intermediate training plan for a noob to western hunting. I'm currently 40, in decent shape, ran 2 half marathons this year before injuring back while training for full marathon. But by no means am I assuming that road fit = mountain fit.
Would love a solid plan that can scale up with weight for hiking and conditioning.
Thanks in advance!
 

hogcarpy

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2014
Messages
22
I live in Omaha and run a bit throughout the year, but ramp it as the hunt gets closer.

A couple months out I’ll run a 5.75 mile loop 2-3 times a week, hike it once with a 50 pack, do a Bodypump class 2 times a week. It seems to have worked well for me. I’m not an expert, so I’m sure I could do something better. I feel like I get plenty of cardio, endurance and strength training.


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Backwoods89

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
33
I dont have a laid out plan but sounds like you have a great head start on a lot of people. Hopefully you are in an area like SW Wisconsin where there are some hills that you can get some miles in with a weighted pack and your hunting boots. Thats the main thing i attempt to do as much as possible.
 

honuswagner

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2019
Messages
38
Location
Utah
Agreed, sounds like you're in better shape than many! Depending on where you're planning to hunt the altitude could be a factor. Going from sea level to hiking at 10,000+ feet will be a factor no matter your physical condition. If you can't train at higher altitudes, I'd be doing fast, intense hiking in the hills out there, trying to maintain a higher heart rate.
 

Block

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
287
You’ve gota just find hills of some sort and get after em with a 30-50 lb pack on.. that or a stair master with ur pack is probably the closest indoor simulation...

I hiked my butt off scouting long hard day hikes in the spring and early summer and was in pretty killer shape. Add some extra food,,, a bow or rifle,,, a tent/bag/pad,,, more water and hotter weather,,. + Extra miles for stalks,,, And you realize it’s pretty dang hard to be in perfect hunt shape.. ur guna get smoked no matter what haha
 

Quicksilver

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2018
Messages
95
Load the pack up, find a hill or stairs at a local stadium you can work up and down. Stair stepper at the gym if the previous two aren’t available. If you can’t get to train at any altitude invest in an altitude mask to restrict your oxygen intake or push yourself to your limits and train on keeping yourself out of breath, get your lungs and muscles used to gasping for air.

Like mentioned above you’re going to get your butt kicked eventually. Stamina is what you’re going for! I can go out and hike then drop into a basin and come back out, later in the season I can just do it quicker and easier with fewer breaks all because of stamina. Sure I get tired, but after a short break you feel like you can keep on trucking over and over again.
 

RyanC

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
247
As the name implies we have training programs built with people like you in mind. Take a look at the website www.traintohunt.com and if you have any questions PM me or drop Kenton an email at [email protected].

We also have memberships for a very reasonable price giving you access to all training programs along with member specific access to daily / weekly videos and tips.

Ryan
 

THBZN

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
186
Can anyone point me in the direction of a solid beginner / intermediate training plan for a noob to western hunting. I'm currently 40, in decent shape, ran 2 half marathons this year before injuring back while training for full marathon. But by no means am I assuming that road fit = mountain fit.
Would love a solid plan that can scale up with weight for hiking and conditioning.
Thanks in advance!
Great to hear you are jumping in on training. There are lots of great options out there. I spend a fair amount of time training just for backcountry hunting and ice/alpine climbing in the winter. Quite a bit of crossover needs.
My "two cents" on what you may want to focus on for backcountry hunting:
- Zone 1 endurance; To be able to churn out the miles, day in and day out with a moderately heavy pack on. Think moderately steep slopes, high-stepping over deadfall, big ridgelines, descending the same stuff, then do it all over again....
- Single leg focus: Bulgarian split squats, one legged deadlifts with single Kettlebell, box step ups/downs, lunges (with and w/o weight). Squats and deadlifts are good too, but we single leg strength and balance is key.
- Core/hip/back strength and integrity: think planks, monster walks with bands, rotational work (Russian twists, Birddogs, etc.)
- active stretching and foam rollers -- keep the muscles loose and mobility high.

I would check out these two as well for an online option to get you started:
http://mtntactical.com/shop/backpacker-preseason-training-plan/ (great starting point workout, and focuses on all the right things)

https://mtntactical.com/shop/big-game-hunting-training-program/?highlight=backcountry hunting (as you get more fit, consider this one; not easy though. Don't jump into this off the couch!)

I hope this helps!
 

sleeper

Newbie
Joined
Jan 30, 2020
Messages
1
Can anyone point me in the direction of a solid beginner / intermediate training plan for a noob to western hunting. I'm currently 40, in decent shape, ran 2 half marathons this year before injuring back while training for full marathon. But by no means am I assuming that road fit = mountain fit.
Would love a solid plan that can scale up with weight for hiking and conditioning.
Thanks in advance!
Afghanistan Pre-Deployment Training Program

 

Zeus401

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Messages
42
Location
NE Ohio
Load the pack up, find a hill or stairs at a local stadium you can work up and down. Stair stepper at the gym if the previous two aren’t available. If you can’t get to train at any altitude invest in an altitude mask to restrict your oxygen intake or push yourself to your limits and train on keeping yourself out of breath, get your lungs and muscles used to gasping for air.

Like mentioned above you’re going to get your butt kicked eventually. Stamina is what you’re going for! I can go out and hike then drop into a basin and come back out, later in the season I can just do it quicker and easier with fewer breaks all because of stamina. Sure I get tired, but after a short break you feel like you can keep on trucking over and over again.
Quicksilver have you used a altitude mask before and if so do they work or are they just a wast of money?
 

Wiscohunter

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2018
Messages
134
Location
Wisconsin
Hi Bdouble, I'll be 40 this year and from WI too (Milwaukee Area). I did my first CO elk hunt last year and although you can never be in too good of shape, my WI conditioning held up and I didn't feel limited. My plan was 2 days weights with emphasis on core lifts, 2 days stairstepper at 60 minutes, 1 day treadmill run at 60 minutes and a long hike with a pack on the weekends (gradually add weight and distance) . Not sure where you live in the state, but Devils Lake has some great hill training... Just get there early before the crowds.

I will likely drop one day of machine cardio and replace with some HIT plus stepups and unweighted strength exercises for this year's training. I think the HIT will help when I'm trying to get up a steep slope or cover ground quickly.

You can't really train for altitude here in WI , so my recommendation is to get into the best shape you can then build in an extra day or two at the beginning of the hunt for acclimatization . By day 4 I didn't even notice the altitude and all that matter was my condition and how banged up my feet were. Last point, make sure to do some long days in your boots.

I'm not suggesting you follow my plan and there are better plans out there. It's just an example of a plan that I fit into a tight work schedule and got me through my 1st elk hunt. If you can run a half marathon, you're starting ahead of most people.
 

Ridge Ghost

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2012
Messages
954
Location
Missoula, MT
Quicksilver have you used a altitude mask before and if so do they work or are they just a wast of money?
Altitude masks only work if they match your flat-brimmed hat.

Seriously though, they are a waste of money. They restrict air intake while you exercise, which means you can't train as hard or effectively as you otherwise could. Then you take the mask off after your workout and spend the rest of your day not wearing it, so your body never actually has time to adapt to any perceived lower oxygen levels.
 
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