Newb Question - Halter vs Get Down Rope

yycyak

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I'm generally a newb when it comes to horses and horsemanship, with most of my experience being around ranch horses and that culture (as opposed to hunting-specific riding/packing.) With that in mind, I have what I'm sure is a dumb question:

I know you're not supposed to lead a horse around with the reins. So a lot of the western ranch horse guys run a "Get Down Rope", which to an uneducated guy like me, seems to be a small under-bridle thing that you run a rope through, and then bowline around the horse's neck. These same ranch guys frown hugely on running halters underneath a bridle. Big faux pas I guess.

But in looking at the Get Down Rope setup, vs a thin and lightweight rope halter, my uneducated brain looks at them both and says "They accomplish the same thing: leading a horse around using not-the-reins."

I get that in a cow pen or a show arena, this stuff probably matters. But when I'm out in the mountains, see a critter, and want to either dismount and walk or temporarily tie the horse up, does it really matter whether I'm running a $400 Get Down Rope contraption, vs a $14 thin rope halter? At the moment I'm inclined to run the rope halter, unless you smart guys here know something I don't.

(Wanted to add that I also wouldn't highline/trailer/long-term tie a horse up with a thin halter - I use a chunkier or flat halter for that.)
 

Robster

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Cwsharer

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Leading your horse with your reins is absolutely ok. Now tying your horse up is a different story . I usually throw a rope halter in the pack saddle or you could put it on your horse . If your horse leads good you won’t have any problems .
 

Logan T

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Just use your normal halter and put your bridle on over it when your in the mountains. Then just take your bridle off and tie up anywhere you may need.
 

missjordan

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The California traditional horsemen use the get down ropes for their spade bit horses. If you lead by the reins and ‘pull’ the horse to go forward to follow you. Then you run the risk of driving the spoon into the roof of the horses mouth. Hence the reason for the get down ropes

Same thing technically happens with horses in other types of shanked bits also. Just exercising a little bit of common sense goes a long way. Don’t betray your horse by driving the curb into the roof of their mouth

Run the halter under your bridle if you want. It’s all fine


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BigAntlerGetter

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The California traditional horsemen use the get down ropes for their spade bit horses. If you lead by the reins and ‘pull’ the horse to go forward to follow you. Then you run the risk of driving the spoon into the roof of the horses mouth. Hence the reason for the get down ropes

Same thing technically happens with horses in other types of shanked bits also. Just exercising a little bit of common sense goes a long way. Don’t betray your horse by driving the curb into the roof of their mouth

Run the halter under your bridle if you want. It’s all fine


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Would be forcing the spade into the tongue, pulling back when riding puts the spade in the roof of the mouth


Run a rope halter I do on all my hunting horses, my employee runs a get down rope, he’s constantly messing with it falling out of his belt Etc. I simply throw my lead rope over the saddle horn and go


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missjordan

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Would be forcing the spade into the tongue, pulling back when riding puts the spade in the roof of the mouth


Run a rope halter I do on all my hunting horses, my employee runs a get down rope, he’s constantly messing with it falling out of his belt Etc. I simply throw my lead rope over the saddle horn and go


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The spade bit is a ‘signal bit’. Designed for the lightest of hands. The theory behind them is if you’ve already done your homework to getting your horse light and supple, the horse will respond off your seat and legs before you need to grab ahold of the bit

They are not a bit for most horsemen.

Pat Puckett on YouTube is a great horseman who is committed to riding and training in the California traditional style. Check him out i love his videos


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wyosteve

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I've always kept my flat halter on with a lead rope and then put the bridle over it. Never a problem. Your idea of a 'rope' halter will work just fine. I keep my lead rope around my saddle horn so it's easily and quickly accessible if I need to dismount and tie up or lead 'em.
 
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The whole scene has turned into somewhat of a costume show lately. Look at professional packers. I don't know of any using get down ropes. Hunting, packing, backcountry riding is different than ranch work. I wouldn't say anything to someone who insisted on using a get down rope in the mountains but I would keep a close eye on them.
 

cshire

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fort fireman

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Leading your horse with your reins is absolutely ok. Now tying your horse up is a different story . I usually throw a rope halter in the pack saddle or you could put it on your horse . If your horse leads good you won’t have any problems .
Depends what you have in the horses mouth. Alot of the halter vs Bosalito with get down rope is dependant on location and style that one is participating in.. Just like weather one ties hard and fast or dallys when working cattle. A grazing bit in Texas is fine to lead a horse by the bridle reins. Now you go somewhere ( say Montana or Nevada) with more of a Buckaroo tradition and that is a huge no no with a spade bit or half breed bit.
 

fort fireman

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The spade bit is a ‘signal bit’. Designed for the lightest of hands. The theory behind them is if you’ve already done your homework to getting your horse light and supple, the horse will respond off your seat and legs before you need to grab ahold of the bit

They are not a bit for most horsemen.

Pat Puckett on YouTube is a great horseman who is committed to riding and training in the California traditional style. Check him out i love his videos


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I like Pat Puckett and his info. Someday, I'll have a horse that can carry a spade and I hopefully will have the hands for one. I work on it everyday and have been since I was about 12 but I don't think I'm there yet. My guy is in the two rein with a half breed right now.
 

missjordan

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I like Pat Puckett and his info. Someday, I'll have a horse that can carry a spade and I hopefully will have the hands for one. I work on it everyday and have been since I was about 12 but I don't think I'm there yet. My guy is in the two rein with a half breed right now.

Me to! Having a light and responsive horse is a long term goal of mine also. I purchased Pats missing link snaffle for a gelding I’m putting some time on and that bit has been awesome. Also highly recommend


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