Optics and methods for brushy country?

Darren Best

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2012
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682
Location
North Idaho
I live and hunt in North Idaho, which the terrain can be steep and thick with timber and brush, which makes hunting difficult.

I used to use calls for hunting, but as many know this has become less than effective and to make matters worse about nine years ago I went deaf.

So I have been in the process of changing my hunting technique.

My question is, how many of you use glass to spot in terrain like I described and what do you use to do it with?

I look at some of your pictures and am amazed at how open and park like many of your hunting areas are.
 

maverick

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Apr 5, 2012
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176
Location
Oregon
Just about everywhere that I hunt is thick timber too. When calling is slow I've had good success sitting wallows. Sometimes I'll chase them in the AM and sit for them in the afternoon. I grew up hunting across the border from you in Montana.
 

rhendrix

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Aug 6, 2012
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I think some of it depends on the time of year your hunting...if it's an archery hunt, most animals are going to be above tree line (unless they've received a lot of hunting pressure). Take that into account when looking and someone's grip and grin photos. What time of year are you hunting in?
 
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Darren Best

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Joined
Dec 30, 2012
Messages
682
Location
North Idaho
Tree lines are rare in this area, while the country is steep, it starts low and it's rare to get above 6000'. In these areas they love the deep, dark brushy and heavy timbered canyons and they are cooler too in September.

I hunt some during archery, but my main focus now is rifle, so that means October. If you look at pics that Ryan Avery and Ross post, you get the idea of how thick it is.

I would like to hear from guys that hunt this kind of ground and use a spotting scope and know if they make it work before I invest 1000 dollars in a scope.
 

rhendrix

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Aug 6, 2012
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With terrain like that I'd just invest in a pair of good 10x42 binos and call it a day. I'm by no means an expert though.
 

dotman

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Feb 24, 2012
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I know exactly what you are talking about, grew up hunting the MT border close to that general part of ID. A spotter will only be useful if you can glass across into drainages, so if that is possible in your general area then I would maybe take one.

I'll be in the panhandle this year and will not even use my binos much, the 4x on my range finder is great in thick dark timber but some 8x32 would probably be nice. I have 8x42 that are great for glassing across but when in the thick nothing beats just a little magnification, imo.

So really only you can answer if a spotter is worth it since you know the area and know if there really is an ability to glass long distance.
 
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Darren Best

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2012
Messages
682
Location
North Idaho
I do have a very lightweight pair of 8X Leica that I use for picking apart brush and timber ahead of me as I move.
 

Racethesunset

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Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
639
Location
Arizona
In AZ there is "rim country" that sounds similar to your description. The transition across elevation creates several types of habitat in a small area, however, optics are a constant here.

If I am in tighter quarters (eg 100-200m visibility) with dense pine and underbrush, panning with 8x42s will give a wide field of view and enough magnification to pull a hoof out of the darkest shadow of a day bed 200m away. I like to lean on the lower power optics for this kind of glassing and movement through cover, and only bring a tripod if I'm stationary for long periods in the denser stuff to watch wild life. For picking up game here, I think eight powers flashed across openings is the way to go.

In open, mountainous country, however, nothing beats a pair of big eyes.
 
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