Packing out an elk

cnelk

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
2,084
Location
N Colorado
Pack frames have come a long ways.

I would highly suggest NOT using a pack like this, as I used to - unless you want to go to a chiropractor afterwards.


 

jtl

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2017
Messages
34
Location
ID
Plan on 5 trips, you might be able to do 4 depending on terrain and elk size. That's what I do at least. How burnt out you are when you shoot the elk is going to be a factor. Shoot it on the first day of the hunt a mile or two from the truck and 4 trips is probably doable. Shoot one on the last day of your hunt 3-5 miles back when you're already exhausted, it's probably a 5 trip deal.

I err on the side of caution when I'm by myself. Falling is more likely if you're overloaded and unstable. Also, breaking down an elk by yourself is both time consuming and tiring, so factor that in. You're not going to be starting out fresh. I seem to always shoot my elk on the last day of the hunt when I'm sleep deprived and worn down.
 

nphunter

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
314
Location
Oregon
Making a meat pole with some blow down and para cord makes boning out so much easier, you can get the quarters hung and cleaned up well. I hang the empty bag under the quarter I'm working on and can drop the deboned meat directly in, i try to get the rear ham off in one big piece which is hard to do while attched to the elk lying on the ground. I also like to get the meat into the shade away from the carcass to avoid all the yellow jackets while working up the quarters. It's amazing how quickly hanging meat cools off even on a hot Sept. day.

IMG_8890.JPG

I also would recommend removing the lower jaw, hide, eyes and as much meat as possible from the skull before packing it out, it is amazing how much extra weight there is on a skull with all of that stuff attached. It only takes about 20-30 minutes to totally clean one off and it is a good way to rest after working up the quarters as well.
111882
 

870

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2017
Messages
12
Location
BRITISH COLUMBIA
normally 4 trips deboned. if your doing it solo I would suggest learning the gutless method and deboning it. the meat also cools down quicker with the bones off.
 

jlaner0408

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2017
Messages
146
Location
SE Idaho
I remember wrestling practice in middle school when we were doing firemen’s carries with a partner, one of my teammates snapped his femur carrying his partner. And that was about 140 pounds. So be smart and only handle what you can with a good pack, good boots, and poles
 

406unltd

Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2018
Messages
81
Hey guys will be doing my First elk hunt this year in Idaho will Be Going solo, my cousin might be able to join me for a day or 2 but not sure if he will be able to take time off yet. Anyway I’ve been training with a 50lb bag of sand in my pack and am going to Be moving up to an 80lbs bag next week. I’m 28 and I’m in pretty good shape. I plan on hiking in from
Camp a few miles for the hunt.

So my question is if I am Lucky enough to get a bull down how many trips do you guys usually take to pack out an elk? And in
What order do you take the quarters out. I’m comfortable with quartering an elk out and getting it hung up just curious how many trips you guys take to pack your elk out?
I solo hunt the last 4 years and when I get a bull down I’ll typically quarter it with bone on because I’m in grizzly country and want to get the hell out of there ASAP. The last couple I took out the tenderloins, backstraps and a front and rear he first trip. Then a front and rear the second trip. Last I go back for the head. These were only a mile +\- packouts so that’s why I did it that way. When I get one further I’ll take both fronts and backstraps, tenderloins first. Then a trip for a rear and head, last trip for the final rear. I am sure that better ways are possible but it’s just what I do. It’s a tall order but totally doable and makes every bite of it that much more memorable. Good luck
 

ScopeScar

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2019
Messages
14
Location
WA
I was hunting solo two years ago and shot one .29 miles from my truck at about 10 am. It took me six trips, the last one finished at about 6 pm or so. It was just getting dark and it was the end of rifle season the first weekend of November, so I guess I could look up the exact time of sunset then.

Some friendly hunters camping nearby resuscitated me with food and drink.
 

DAOutfitters208

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2017
Messages
182
Location
Coeur d' Alene, ID
In 95% of the situations, you will be taking 4 trips if you have a pack that is capable of hauling meat on you back when you get him down. Other wise you will be taking a trip to the truck to get the pack frame. I usually throw the neck meat, the back straps, tenderloins, in my day pack on the trip to get the pack frame. Then one trip per quarter and you are done!
 

rodney482

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
2,250
Trekking poles.... 100% ..... even if you have to grab some sticks and make them.


For packing out an elk I’d recommend two things: a good pack and trekking poles. You can score some decent poles at Costco or look at close outs at STP. Wish I’d started using poles earlier in my elk hunting days.
 

sneaky

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
4,489
Location
ID
I guess I should look on the bright side of only drawing cow tags. One less trip and no one has stolen an udder.
If they did, would that be an udder catastrophe? Or just udderly disappointing?

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

hayesplow

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2019
Messages
212
Location
Ohio
I told my buddy that we gonna have to eat a bunch of it onsite before we start packing it out. (y)(y)
 

Iman

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2017
Messages
12
Location
Alberta
Does anybody have experience with using the pack wheel or a similar cart for return trips?
 
Top