Paper tuning

rm06

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I'm fairly new to archery and setting up bows. I happened to get a real good deal on a Hoyt Defiant Carbon 34 and I've been setting it up piece by piece over the last few weeks/months. I traded out a Whisker Biscuit for a Hamskea Hybrid Hunter Pro Micro Tune which led me to some articles on paper tuning which I thought I would give a try.

I've been shooting with the Hamskea and have it mostly tuned how I want it but I wanted to post results of the paper test to see whether the more experienced think it needs further adjustment. It isn't punching perfect holes but it is close and it seems to group well for me though I'm still learning and not the best judge

 

boom

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i'm no pro..but from there i would screw on a broadhead of my choosing and fire a few at 30 yards. getting a broadhead to fly right is my end-game anyways. i shoot paper as a jumping off point.

good luck and awesome work attempting it yourself..
 

OR Archer

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You're high right. If you have a press put a half turn in the right yoke and take a half turn out of the left. You can then move your rest up 1/16" to fix the tail high portion.
 

camping1601

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I'm no pro myself but I only BS without fletchings. Add the weight of the fletching to the back with some electrical tape and shoot those through paper.
 

Muley15

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I agree with boom as well. Paper tuning is a good place to start but fixed head tuning is better and kind of throws the paper tuning out the window. Broad head tuning at 30-40 yards is more important. I have had very few bows where my arrows would paper tune perfect and fly fixed blades perfect.
 

jlrichesin

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madras, oregon
You're high right. If you have a press put a half turn in the right yoke and take a half turn out of the left. You can then move your rest up 1/16" to fix the tail high portion.

OR Archer, what days are slow for you? I live in Madras, however got to eugene a lot and would like some assistance to make sure that I have a good setup.

Thanks!
Josh
 

Brendan

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I'm no pro myself but I only BS without fletchings. Add the weight of the fletching to the back with some electrical tape and shoot those through paper.

I agree with you - but he's paper tuning now, not bareshaft tuning. If you're bareshaft tuning - no need to shoot through paper as you can see the results easily how the arrow hits the target as compared to a fletched shaft shot at same point of aim.

OP: Paper tuning will work fine to start - I might try to clean things up a little more, I prefer using the yokes if you have a press, if not you can use your rest:

Paper tuning 101 - Lancaster Archery Supply - Archery How To

Once you've got it flying well through paper, then you can try bare shaft shooting too - but if you don't execute a shot with really good form, you can induce some pretty wacky bare shaft flight even if the bow is tuned dead on.

Once those two are good, I've never had to make any changes once I moved to broadheads.

At the end of the day - if your broadheads are hitting with your field points out to the ranges you shoot, you're in pretty good shape.
 

jmez

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You should strive for perfect holes. You will shoot better.

I would caution against bare shaft tuning at this point. I know it is the current rage but it is difficult to do. Bare shafting tells you as much about your form as it does your tune. If you don't have really good form you will end up very frustrated and chasing your tail. IMO, if you are inexperienced, it is a great way to improve your form and a poor way to tune your bow.
 

camping1601

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I agree with you - but he's paper tuning now, not bareshaft tuning. If you're bareshaft tuning - no need to shoot through paper as you can see the results easily how the arrow hits the target as compared to a fletched shaft shot at same point of aim.

OP: Paper tuning will work fine to start - I might try to clean things up a little more, I prefer using the yokes if you have a press, if not you can use your rest:

Paper tuning 101 - Lancaster Archery Supply - Archery How To

Once you've got it flying well through paper, then you can try bare shaft shooting too - but if you don't execute a shot with really good form, you can induce some pretty wacky bare shaft flight even if the bow is tuned dead on.

Once those two are good, I've never had to make any changes once I moved to broadheads.

At the end of the day - if your broadheads are hitting with your field points out to the ranges you shoot, you're in pretty good shape.

I meant to say BS through paper, but I also agree with jmez. It took me quite some time to get comfortable with reading my results and trusting my form and release.

Bottom line for me is I want the arrow leaving the bow as close to perfect as can be without fletchings so that when the arrow has fletchings it should be easier for that arrow to get where it needs to be when I f-up in a hunting situation.

I also only shoot mechanicals so if I get a good BS leaving the bow and mechs hitting with FP's at say 80 yards I feel good. Minus some elevation loss from wind drag from the BH.

Edit: I personally have learned more about my form and grip from BS through paper than anything else. It really shows things.
 

Brendan

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Edit: I personally have learned more about my form and grip from BS through paper than anything else. It really shows things.

I should be more clear: I bare shaft tune all my bows - I know exactly what it's all about, how to do so, and the impact of form on bare shaft flight. But, why do it through paper? You can see exactly how the bare shaft is impacting without using paper at all by impact point and orientation of the shaft in the target. Plus - if you want to bare shaft tune with respect to a specific point of impact at 20 or 30 yards - paper makes that pretty difficult.

I guess it doesn't hurt, but I just want to make sure I'm not missing something as I wouldn't see it giving you any additional info?
 
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camping1601

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I should be more clear: I bare shaft tune all my bows - I know exactly what it's all about, how to do so, and the impact of form on bare shaft flight. But, why do it through paper? You can see exactly how the bare shaft is impacting without using paper at all by impact point and orientation of the shaft in the target. Plus - if you want to bare shaft tune with respect to a specific point of impact at 20 or 30 yards - paper makes that pretty difficult.

I guess it doesn't hurt, but I just want to make sure I'm not missing something as I wouldn't see it giving you any additional info?
#1 reason is that I can do it in my basement regardless of weather. I have to drive to a range to shoot outdoors or take it with me on weekend car camping trips.

Edit: In the distance available in my basement ( around 12 yards ) I can see small tears in paper.
 

Brendan

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#1 reason is that I can do it in my basement regardless of weather. I have to drive to a range to shoot outdoors or take it with me on weekend car camping trips.

Edit: In the distance available in my basement ( around 12 yards ) I can see small tears in paper.

I do the same, I just don't use paper. 0 - 7 yards in my basement, and I just compare to a fletched shaft. Once it's good there, I move to longer ranges.

Hard to tell from the picture - but slight tail left on the bare shaft:

 

camping1601

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I do the same, I just don't use paper. 0 - 7 yards in my basement, and I just compare to a fletched shaft. Once it's good there, I move to longer ranges.

Hard to tell from the picture - but slight tail left on the bare shaft:


I agree with this 100% but I have a big Thirdhand DIY rag target. Either way we're getting results from what's available to us.
 

Brendan

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I agree with this 100% but I have a big Thirdhand DIY rag target. Either way we're getting results from what's available to us.

Yep - different ways to do the same thing. A rag target will probably deflect the arrow so paper is a benefit there...
 
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