Pine borer

Hawker

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Mar 11, 2012
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153
Location
Michigan
Can anyone tell if all of dead or dying trees in Colorado have an effect on the elk. I was thinking that the dead stands of pines would now be to warm without the shade. We are hunting a new area this year. Should this be a concern of mine? Any thoughts would be nice.
Thanks
Hawker
 

couesbitten

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Feb 29, 2012
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1,459
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East Wenatchee, WA
My thought would be that these areas would be similar to areas that have had fires. The dead trees open up the canopy, and allow more light in for underbrush, grasses etc. to grow, essentially making them feeding areas.
 

philw

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Feb 26, 2012
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151
Location
Colorado
What elevation will you be hunting? The drier slopes have been hit hardest by the bark beetles. The wetter areas and high alpine areas are less affected. The area I hunt is spruce/fir at higher elevations (>10,500) and is unscathed. Something to consider, especially if you can hunt the early seasons.
 

Swede

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Mar 24, 2012
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382
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Warren Oregon
I have not seen your situation in Colorado, but I would expect the dead timber to open the area for much more quality forage. This situation should last several years. If good forage was in short supply, then you could see more amimals and larger antlers, but moving in on them could be more difficult until the young timber stand gets reestablished.
 

gil_wy

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Feb 27, 2012
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184
Actually the more trees that hit the ground the fewer hunters there will be and, thus, more elk will be there... at least that is my pine beetle experience.
 
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Hawker

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Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
153
Location
Michigan
Thanks I wasn't thinking about the food possibilities. Last year we saw these dead trees all the way up to above timberline. It appeared that the elk had moved on. I figured it because it was now to warm for them.
 
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