Pine Pellets Scent Control

Sanad

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Hello everyone,

I'm new to hunting and wanted to get your input for a scent control idea I got to store my hunting clothes and gear. I apologize if such an idea has already been brought up before, but I couldn't find anything on the subject when I searched.

I got this idea from my cat's DIY litter box! Let me explain...

I use pelletized bedding for my cat's litter box, which can be found for around $5 to $7 per 40 lb bag at any Tractor Supply store. This is basically pine pellets that are made from compacted saw dust. It readily absorbs any moisture or smell it comes in contact with and will turn back into saw dust when it becomes wet or damp. It is so effective at covering up smell, that I can literally put my nose right on top of the litter box after my cat uses it and smell nothing but pine. I made the litter box by getting two bins and stacking one on top of the other, then I drilled a bunch of holes in the top bin. In this way, I can shake out all the contaminated litter that turned to saw dust into the bottom bin through the holes in the top bin. With this litter box, I'm able to use the same pine pellets for weeks because I'm able to effectively get rid of all the saw dust that absorbed all moisture and smell. They actually sell litter boxes like this specifically for use with pelletized bedding, but I made my own as I found the commercially available ones way too small.

I was thinking this might just make a perfect storage bin idea for hunting clothes and gear to absorb all the smell and moisture. In this way, even if you throw your clothes and gear into the bin wet or damp, the pellets will dry it out and you can shake out all the contaminated saw dust into the bottom bin to get rid of it. Seeing as to how well it works for covering up the smell of cat feces and urine, I believe this method will greatly mitigate any scents on hunting clothing and gear. One bag of pellets should last a whole season, if not more. But, the bags are cheap enough that it would make more sense to change out the pellets every season to be on the safe side. I know many people use baking soda or wood chips in storage containers for the same purpose, but I suspect this method will work even better for getting rid of scent due to how absorbent the pellets are, with an added benefit of masking the scent of clothing and gear with the scent of pine since the pellets seem to have a much stronger pine smell than wood chips do. Of course, one can always put baking soda in with the pine pellets as well, which might further increase the scent control capability.

Thoughts?

EDIT: Please note, the purpose of this thread isn't to debate whether scent control matters. For those who do practice scent control and believe it matters, your feedback on this idea is welcome.
 
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Sanad

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What is the perceived benefit of doing this?
Well, once your hunting clothes are washed, there are many ways you can potentially contaminate them with scents while storing them and while transporting them to your hunt site. This would be a cheap and simple idea for a storage bin that I think would minimize the chance of scent contamination. Also, if you are not able to wash your hunting clothes and gear after each and every hunt, I think this would help get rid of the accumulated scent and rapidly dry everything out as well.
 

Dos Perros

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How are you mitigating the scent on your breath? What about body odors from hiking? What about lubricants on your gear?
 
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Sanad

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How are you mitigating the scent on your breath? What about body odors from hiking? What about lubricants on your gear?
I'm not sure what any of the issues you mentioned have to do with the idea I'm talking about... My idea was for a hunting gear STORAGE BIN. Why would a storage bin be the solution to your breath or other odors you pick up during hiking?

A storage bin for hunting would be used to mitigate smell contamination before and after your hunt, not during. The problems you are talking during the hunt would need different scent mitigation strategies. This storage bin would just be one part of an entire system one should have to control scent. This would cost nearly nothing as opposed to other "high tech" hunting gear storage closets and bins, and would probably work just as well, if not better.
 

Okhotnik

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Well, once your hunting clothes are washed, there are many ways you can potentially contaminate them with scents while storing them and while transporting them to your hunt site. This would be a cheap and simple idea for a storage bin that I think would minimize the chance of scent contamination. Also, if you are not able to wash your hunting clothes and gear after each and every hunt, I think this would help get rid of the accumulated scent and rapidly dry everything out as well.
dump a box of baking soda on your clothes in the rinse cycle. dry outside. As mentioned never completely get rid of orders . Not a fan of masking scents on clothes
 
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Sanad

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dump a box of baking soda on your clothes in the rinse cycle. dry outside. As mentioned never completely get rid of orders . Not a fan of masking scents on clothes
What are the disadvantages of masking scents if done properly? I can't imagine a deer being spooked from the smell of pine.
 

Dos Perros

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I'm not sure what any of the issues you mentioned have to do with the idea I'm talking about... My idea was for a hunting gear STORAGE BIN. Why would a storage bin be the solution to your breath or other odors you pick up during hiking?

A storage bin for hunting would be used to mitigate smell contamination before and after your hunt, not during. The problems you are talking during the hunt would need different scent mitigation strategies. This storage bin would just be one part of an entire system one should have to control scent. This would cost nearly nothing as opposed to other "high tech" hunting gear storage closets and bins, and would probably work just as well, if not better.

I think total scent control is impossible, therefore any scent control is worthless. Who cares if a deer can't smell your clothes if he can smell your breath? Most folks on this site kill things many days without a shower. I know there are some hardcore believers in scent control, whitetail guys. I would never purchase your product unless its benefits and therefore value could be scientifically demonstrated.
 
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Sanad

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I think total scent control is impossible, therefore any scent control is worthless. Who cares if a deer can't smell your clothes if he can smell your breath? Most folks on this site kill things many days without a shower. I know there are some hardcore believers in scent control, whitetail guys. I would never purchase your product unless its benefits and therefore value could be scientifically demonstrated.
My product? I never said I was selling anything. This is just something I was going to utilize myself that I thought I would share with others who might want to try it.

The point of my thread wasn't to start a debate on whether scent control matters. For those who do believe scent control measures should be taken, this would be a really cheap and simple storage bin to make.
 
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Sanad

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If you only wanted supportive comments you could have just mentioned that. Just giving my honest feedback is all.
Your feedback is welcome as it pertains to the subject matter. I simply don't want the discussion to go off topic by having this go into a debate on whether scent control matters.

The purpose of this discussion is for those who do practice scent control and believe scent control does help to give their thoughts on whether they think this storage bin idea would help as part of a scent control system. Again, this would part of an entire system one would practice, not as a standalone solution.

It's called scent control, not scent elimination. Of course, there is no way to completely eliminate odor. But you can certainly do a lot to mitigate scent.
 

crich

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Not going to get a really interactive crowd on Rokslide when it comes to scent control. When hunting whitetails in Ohio where I grew up it was always a low exertion hunt so working up a sweat on a hike to a ridge to glass was never a thing. I would store my clothes with pine branches and cedar chips to help mask any odor that may have not been eliminated by washing. I think the pellets you're taking about may do a good job but its hard to say if all this stuff is snake oil or not because we dont have a nose like a deer. Avoiding scents on your skin, using scented products, touching dogs, pumping gas etc all go a long way for scent control. Another thing I do is tuck my pants into my rubber boots so every step doesn't cause air to shoot out the bottom of my pants and leave scent on my trail. Ultimately hunting the wind is the best option but using a cover scent.
 

cjdewese

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I am under the impression that anything helps, but nothing is perfect unless you keep the wind in your face.

Definitely give it a shot, and let us know what happens.

Yesterday I had 2 deer less than 10 yards and I know I was smelly after a 2 mile hike gaining 1500 feet of elevation. Just had a perfect light breeze in my face the whole time.
 

Wellsdw

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Cover scent in general hide human smells from humans. To a deer, elk, or especially a bear you would just smell like a human covered in pine scent. People have a hard time putting into prospective how dang good a deers nose actually is. That said if it gives you a Sense of confidence go for. Your hunting partner after a week May appreciate it
 

DavyCrockett

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I found your post interesting, not sure what's with you getting pounced on by Dos, not really a good way to treat new people.

I have no idea if scent control makes an impact or not, I imagine 99.9% of this forum hasn't done any scientific studies to know. However, I found the properties you brought up of compacted pellets and their ability to reduce moisture and absorb scent pretty interesting. Also, pretty cool how they turn to saw dust when moisture is absorbed to know its done its job. I have had a lot of issues with the color changing dehumidifier gels for guns because they dont seem to actually change color when they have done their jobs and its pricy. I wonder if a tin of these could do the same thing.

Thanks for sharing.
 

ODB

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dump a box of baking soda on your clothes in the rinse cycle. dry outside. As mentioned never completely get rid of orders . Not a fan of masking scents on clothes

I use half a box of baking soda to wash my hunting clothes. Not even detergent. I just ran a load yesterday. Today they simply smell like cloth after letting them hang dry. No funk, no nothing, just cloth.
 

Reburn

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Your feedback is welcome as it pertains to the subject matter. I simply don't want the discussion to go off topic by having this go into a debate on whether scent control matters.

The purpose of this discussion is for those who do practice scent control and believe scent control does help to give their thoughts on whether they think this storage bin idea would help as part of a scent control system. Again, this would part of an entire system one would practice, not as a standalone solution.

It's called scent control, not scent elimination. Of course, there is no way to completely eliminate odor. But you can certainly do a lot to mitigate scent.

So just so I'm clear. What amount of scent control is nessecary to achive the desired result?

I found your post interesting, not sure what's with you getting pounced on by Dos, not really a good way to treat new people.

I have no idea if scent control makes an impact or not, I imagine 99.9% of this forum hasn't done any scientific studies to know. However, I found the properties you brought up of compacted pellets and their ability to reduce moisture and absorb scent pretty interesting. Also, pretty cool how they turn to saw dust when moisture is absorbed to know its done its job. I have had a lot of issues with the color changing dehumidifier gels for guns because they dont seem to actually change color when they have done their jobs and its pricy. I wonder if a tin of these could do the same thing.

Thanks for sharing.

So just so I'm clear. What amount of scent control is nessecary to achive the desired result?

There have been numerous studies showing that a deers nose is on better then a dog and none of the scent control products on the market were capable of stopping a dogs nose.
 
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Sanad

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So just so I'm clear. What amount of scent control is nessecary to achive the desired result?

There have been numerous studies showing that a deers nose is on better then a dog and none of the scent control products on the market were capable of stopping a dogs nose.

Again, I really didn’t start the thread to debate scent control, but… Out of curiosity, do you know of any studies that were conducted in a manner where the dog had to determine the location of the target scent without getting any closer than, say, 25 to 50 yards away? I would think such a study, if it exists, would be more relevant for hunting.

I don’t think scent control is ever intended to prevent a deer from smelling you. I was under the impression that scent control would be more intended to hinder a deer’s ability to gauge exactly how far away the scent is, which would influence whether or not it would be more likely to get spooked.

For me, as a new hunter, I think I need any amount of help I can get. Which is why I don’t mind taking a few extra steps to prepare for a hunt if it would potentially better my odds, even if only slightly.


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Reburn

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Again, I really didn’t start the thread to debate scent control, but… Out of curiosity, do you know of any studies that were conducted in a manner where the dog had to determine the location of the target scent without getting any closer than, say, 25 to 50 yards away? I would think such a study, if it exists, would be more relevant for hunting.

I don’t think scent control is ever intended to prevent a deer from smelling you. I was under the impression that scent control would be more intended to hinder a deer’s ability to gauge exactly how far away the scent is, which would influence whether or not it would be more likely to get spooked.

For me, as a new hunter, I think I need any amount of help I can get. Which is why I don’t mind taking a few extra steps to prepare for a hunt if it would potentially better my odds, even if only slightly.


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Your topic is scent control and if pine will help. The answer is no. No amount of scent control will help if you play the wind wrong. Play the wind right and no amount of scent control is needed.

Yes but Im not going digging for it. Its out there in the internet sphere. Clothes went into scent contol came out asked dog to find owner and went straight to the clothes.

Again. What amount of human scent is enough to spook a mature deer. The answer when you play the wind it doesnt matter.

Learn how to hunt the wind. You will be miles and hundreds of dollars ahead.
 

Desk Jockey

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I put some dried pine bows in my tubs where I keep my hunting gear. I feel like it is better than nothing and it does convey a “cover” scent. As others have mentioned, that is a “neutral” starting point at best. Sweat, breath, other odors take over from there. Nothing I have found will keep you from getting busted if the wind is against you.
 
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