Question(s) about running and races?

rhendrix

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 6, 2012
Messages
2,098
I know most of you haven't even kicked off your hunting seasons yet, but since mine is over and done with and all I have left is a lot of time sitting in trees I figure now is as good as time as any to plan out next years goals. It was abundantly clear to me that going from 100' above sea level to 10,000' will cause you to huff and puff all day long, so my goal for the upcoming year is to make sure I'm in the best cardiovascular shape I could possibly be in. To accomplish this feat I figured I'd better start running, and what's the point of running if you don't race? What are some good times for a 6' 240# dude (hoping to drop 25-30 pounds over the next year as well) to run for a 5k, 10k and half marathon? If I stick to the Hal Higdon approach for training, should I be training my lower body on the strength days or just my upper? And can I do CrossFit type workouts on the days it calls for cross training?
 

30338

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Messages
1,492
Not sure what age you are, but I ran a couple of 1 hour 55 minute half marathons in my 40s. I would not do races in the month or so leading up to a hunt as I think folks competitive nature takes over and your risk of injury does go up. Some of the best mountain hunters I have been out with have been very avid bikers. I did some bike training this summer and to me, it seems like a better way to get my heart rate way up and reduce pounding on my knees. Again, I am in the older group and I am sure the real athletes will chime in on this. Good idea on dropping the weight also, good luck.
 

unm1136

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 30, 2012
Messages
426
Location
Albuquerque NM
A while back I picked up Brain Training For Runners by Matt Fitzgerald. It has several customizeable programs of 4-6 months to progressively improve fitness in general and the running of races specifically. The book is easy to read, and covers 5k, 10k, half, and full marathons. I have been running off and on for years (more off than on) and I like the way this book breaks things down and plans to train them. My problem in the past is that I try to do way too much way too fast, leading to injury and burnout, and taking a full year, laying out goals, and having a step by step plan to accomplish them really helps. I got my copy for my nook color, and unlike many books (Jack Daniels' running book on a kindle comes to mind) the tables and charts are in the ebook format and very useful.

pat
 

HellsCanyon

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 29, 2012
Messages
3,474
Location
Lewiston ID
I'm with 30338, if you have places to ride a mountain bike off road up and down hills that is something I would definitely throw into the mix. It really helps your climbing muscles as well as cardiovascular system.

I'm not a runner yet so can't help you there!

Mike
 

jmez

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
6,730
Location
Piedmont, SD
You don't have to do distance running to condition for the mountains. If you want to that is great but I would also concentrate on burst/sprint training and strength training as well.

Some people can run and some struggle, I'm in the struggle category and always have been. I was a sprinter in track and played Div I football in college. My body and muscle type is not conducive to long distance running. You don't see guys built like me running anything over 400 meters and there is a reason for that. I think it is actually counter productive for me to just go out and run. I get a much better workout biking or running intervals than distance running. The last couple of years we have base camped at 10,500 and never hunted below 11,500, conditioning was not an issue with me and I didn't do any distance running.

I run a lot of sprints and hill sprints. I lift weights 4-5 days a week. I mountain bike and swim as well as hike the Black Hills with a weighted pack. People with argue but I think physical strength is just as important in mountain hunting as cardiovascular conditioning. Strap 70lbs on a skinny little marathon runner and me and I bet I would beat him to the top of a 2000 foot steep climb. Put us both on the road to run and I would lose sight of him within 800 meters and if talking a long distance I wouldn't make the finish line. There is a balance in mountain hunting.

Be versatile. Right now my lifting consists of circuits with lower weights and high reps. Generelly 4-5 lifts, burpees, and situps done in succession for 4-5 sets with no rest periods. Then head straight to the cardio room and ride the stairmaster for a varialble amount of time. When I get home I will do hill sprints and burpees. In December I wouldn't be able to complete this type of workout. It is intense. The cross fit stuff is good but IMO there are not many people out there that can maintain the intensity of cross fit over the long term. Ramp it up and do it the three months leading up to your hunt, then back it off for a while after you get home. Otherwise you will become a victim of attrition.

Distance running isn't bad but it also isn't the end all be all for mountain training. It can be the base for your training but doesn't have to be.
 

2rocky

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
1,084
Location
Nor Cal
As a guy about the same size as you, that started running in 2005, here is my perspective.

I wouldn't set a time goal until you did a training run over 10 miles. Then I'd plug a time into a McMillan Calculator.

Distance Run Training helps your day to day recovery time get shorter. This pays off in the mountains.

Crossfit is a good crosstraining exercise. I wish I could do something similar 2x a week.

Not familiar with Higdon's plans. so no comment on the Strength training. one day a week of Speedwork will improve your form and your 5k time the most.

I agree that with you that without a race on the horizon I don't have the motivation to train.

Now no elk has stopped while walking by to ask me my last race time though...;)


There is some weight loss that comes with training, but sometimes trying to lose weight and increase distance and speed work against each other. Eat well, keep a food journal, but don't restrict calories too much if you want to make progress training.

Write down a weekly training schedule and log your runs.
 

Z Barebow

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 24, 2012
Messages
150
I can't give you time estimates. But CrossFit on strength days would be just fine. I agree with 2Rocky, tough to get an estimate until you have done a few races (shorter). In your early races, don't worry about time. They will be a learning experience and a journey of self discovery. From that knowledge, you can start develpoing race goals.

I am a lean dude, so I am not the best to give eating advice. Other than I treat food as fuel, not something to fill my gut. I eat foods which are high in nutritional value and minimize processed stuff. Lean meats, complex carbs, plenty of fruits, nuts and veggies. I try and avoid stuff that is white, in a bag or in a box. I have probably drank a total of a 12 pack of pop since 2004.
 
OP
R

rhendrix

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 6, 2012
Messages
2,098
Thanks for the feedback gents, I'll keep working up towards a couple of races and report back with my findings.

I like the idea of using my road bike to supplement running as well. I felt like I was trying to chase too many goals last year, so I'm taking a KISS approach and gonna focus on my cardiovascular endurance for a while until I have a good base, then I'll do more specific training for backpacking.
 

G Posik

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
522
Location
Houston,Texas
Since you live close to me we can do some runs together if you like. Also check out Cypress Running Club. I am a member there and they have some coaches that can help. Group runs always help. I will be back in town 12 September.

Glenn
 
OP
R

rhendrix

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 6, 2012
Messages
2,098
Glen, I always forget you live around here buddy. I'm gonna send ya a PM here shortly.
 
Top