Recovery - Long runs in high heat

FlyGuy

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Hoping for some experienced advise with this issue. I'm full on training for September. Finally got motivated to get back in shape after the mtn kicked my tail last year. I'm down about 35 lbs since Jan, would like to lose 10-15 more. I'm doing one long run per week, currently 10-12 miles. I live in the Houston area now though, and I'm really struggling with this heat. I've always been an above average sweater, but this heat is really pulling it out of me. I Run trails to give me shade, start really early to get the best Temps available, and I get in a lot of fluids before and during a run (killed an entire 100 oz bladder during my run this morning).

My question is - what should I be drinking afterwards to aid in recovery? For the last 3-4 weeks I feel drained for the entire day after a long run. Heck I'm still feeling terrible after my run that was >10 hours ago. I really don't want to drink a bunch of high calorie Gatorade, but I'm feeling like maybe I'm getting "washed out" from all the fluids in and out? Any ideas on what can help reduce the recovery time?
 

Brendan

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Are you taking in any electrolytes, or just water? Nuun tabs work great during, then a blend of protein and carbs right when you finish to aid recovery. Most runners I know swear by chocolate milk...
 
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FlyGuy

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Mtn ops ignite beforehand, then just water during the run (using a bladder). Never heard of nuun tabs, will check it out.
 

d3ntalbliss

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After running 10-12 miles you shouldn't concern yourself with caloric intake. If you are do a Powerade or Gatorade zero or low calorie option

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Ironman8

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What are you doing for your nutrition? It may be what you're eating (or not eating) just as much as what you're drinking.
 

P Carter

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This may be a bit counter-intuitive, but I would try drinking less. 100 ounces over 10-12 miles seems excessive. In my experience, you shouldn't need anything if the run is under 2 hours if you're adequately hydrated beforehand. Drinking that much might be throwing your other nutrition out of whack. Perhaps cut down on water progressively. Or, at least try to get some salt intake to balance out that amount of water.

I've also had good luck with nuun during longer runs (3-4 hours plus during long races). Good luck and keep it up!
 

Felix40

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I agree with that. 100oz is too much water in less than two hours. At least mix it 50:50 with gatorade or something.
 

plumber1969

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Flyguy, good for you being able to run in this freaking heat and HUMIDITY. Me and the wife are still hiking several miles on Saturday and Sunday with our loaded packs, mine is close to 50 pounds now. The humidity at 6:00AM here in Northeast Florida is horrendous, couple that with the mosquito's, yellow flies and horse flies it is all we can do to push on. We have exactly 67 days before we leave for our elk hunt. We drink a load of Gatorade to help recover.
 

Brendan

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I don't think drinking less water is the answer. OP has said he sweats more than normal, and I'm pretty sure it's off the charts hot and humid in Houston right now. Haven't temperatures been above 100 degrees? And I wouldn't be surprised if he's dealing with 90-100% humidity and if he's losing that much fluid in sweat in those temps if he's a big guy. Nothing like training in cooler or dryer temps... BUT - it shouldn't be just water.

You can do better than gatorade, unless you want the sugar / carbs. I find it easier on my stomach if I dilute it 50/50 with water if I do drink it. I like Nuun because it's really just electrolytes, and then you can choose if you want other "Fuel" separately. I think for that much sweating - I'd be doing at least 2 tabs. I run a lot of stadiums in the heat, and 1 tab mixed in 1-2 Nalgenes for an hour and a half workout helps a bunch. You don't want to do too much though.

Recovery - don't skimp because you're trying to lose weight. Have a scoop of Endurox, a glass of chocolate milk, or my favorite: throw a bunch of frozen fruit in the blender with a scoop of protein powder, big scoop of full-fat greek yogurt, and just a little milk. All of these are a good mix of protein and carbs that will help you recover after a workout like that.
 
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gauge

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I have been in your shoes when training for my first marathon. Your body get flushed of its electrolytes. In my opinion, Gatorade and sports drinks in general are junk. If you actually look at the nutritional facts they don't have a tremendous amount of electrolytes to offer. These drinks are just high in sugar but are marketed to make us think they are "sports" drinks. Drinking coconut water has changed the game for me when it comes to long runs in hot/humid weather. It is nature's Gatorade. Also, do a quick google search on foods high in electrolytes. You can replenish with a good healthy diet of whole foods.
Nuun tabs get good reviews but I have not personally used them.
Good luck, stay after it!
 

colobow

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I like Nuun because it's really just electrolytes,

not sure which NUUN you are using but most have a lot of sugar in it. I stopped using them because they bothered my stomach especially on longer trail runs.

They pretty much all have some sugar in them. I'm trying emergen-c electro mix and VEGA electrolyte hydrator.

Afterwords I'm going with a fruit smoothie like @Brendan was mentioning and adding raw BEETS and some hemp protein.

BEETS are vasodilators, diolated vascular system helps move more blood, oxygen and nutrients through your body. Arugula is an even more powerful Vasodilotor.

I try to have vasodilators before exercise also.


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colobow

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Nuun Active - 10 calories, 4g carb, 1g sugar.

nuun active | nuun

Good to know. Under other ingredients it lists dextrose and stevia. Not sure if 1g of sugar includes the dextrose, could be the stevia that was bugging my stomach.

I've been taking raw honey packs on runs/hikes. Seems to work so far


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P Carter

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Not here to argue. But no one needs 100 ounces of water on a 10-12 mile run, assuming it's at a running pace and less than 2 hours. Even if he sweated that much, there's no need to replace 100% (or any %, on runs less than 2 hours) of the water you sweat while you are running. Hydrate before, hydrate and eat afterwards.

Drinking less may or may not relieve the "drained" feeling. As the body becomes more adapted to running in the heat, that feeling should diminish. As should the need to drink so much during.

This comesfrom my experience. I used to have a camelbak w/70 ounces of fluid on all runs 8 miles or greater. That was a really really long distance for me at the time. Then I started running with some other longer-distance runners who wouldn't take anything on runs under 2 hours. That was a game-changer for me. A few years later, I can hop out the door for runs up to 18 miles (~3ish hours) in the hills with nothing. Without that advice from those longer-distance guys, I would never have gone farther or taken less. Of course, your mileage may vary, but I thought that was at least worth passing along as a thought.

On the nuun, I use nuun all day, which I believe has no sugar. I also keep nutrition and water separate so as not to over-hydrate.
 

307

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Look up hyponatremia. It's far more dangerous to drink too much water than too little for a run of 2ish hours.
 

Felix40

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Look up hyponatremia. It's far more dangerous to drink too much water than too little for a run of 2ish hours.

Exactly. There was a guy who was training for the Texas Water Safari (200 something mile canoe race in the dead of summer) a few years ago. He was drinking twice as much water as everyone told him to drink. He kept saying that the sweat a lot and needed the water. Long story short, he died because he flushed all the salt out of his body. That happens to a lot of people but I remember this one vividly because a dozen people told him "you dont need that much water" and he didnt listen.
 

WV Mountaineer

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Drink water no doubt. But, be smarter about it. I'm betting everything I have, you are washing yourself thin on nutrients, intaking and expelling that much water.



Three years ago, I was recovering from Chemo and getting off excess steroid weight. I started off well as I had worked out most of my life but, a couple months in, once it got hot, I was really wore down. I had made good progress but, I was used up. Lucky for me, it was time for my quarterly checkup so, once blood work was conducted, i found out I was magnesium, potassium, and sodium depleted. The Magnesium and Potassium was a result of what chemo did to my bone marrow. The sodium was a result of sweating heavily and, ingesting to much water alone. I was eating well but, not well enough for my new condition. I could only change the Magnesium and Potassium with supplements. The sodium I changed with an effort to eat more of it and, get off the low sodium diet I had always followed pre-chemo.



I told you that to get you to consider three things that WILL help you from my experience. First, make sure you are eating enough good "meat and vegetable" foods and do NOT practice a low sodium diet. Increase it. You NEED it now more than ever. Second, take vitamin and mineral supplements. Third and final, put some whole milk and/or TOMATO juice in your diet. Don't be scared of it. If you aren't a milk fan, just do it for the vitamins and bone health every night before bed. A quart of tomato juice the day after your run too. It is LOADED with potassium and sodium. In a week you'll feel much better. In a month, you'll be a MACHINE. God Bless
 

GraveyardNRSE

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To stay hydrated and prevent cramps try to consume some BCAA's before and after. I found the best ones were Scivation Xtend. Mt ops does make decent products. They have great marketing (different topic). Best recovery-->Before workout (1-2 hr before) I drink BCAA's. Then my preworkout--Prejym....Afterwards--Post jym and pro jym. I've fiddled with plenty of supplements and these seems to have worked the best. Yes I've tried Mt Ops products and it doesn't compare to the ones listed. Keep your protein intake high!
 

Brendan

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Did some looking around. An average person sweats from a little below 1L/hr to around 1.4L/hr while exercising. Highest rate recorded by an athlete was 3.7L/hr, and highest rate recorded period was 5L/hr.

So, take a bigger guy (OP is down 35lbs, and shooting for 50lbs), 100+ degree heat, high humidity, out doing a long run or hike? Let's say 2-3 hours? I don't think 100oz (~3L) is out of the question for during and after a run/hike - but, I think we all agree, it needs to include electrolytes.

My experience - I can do an hour and a half stadium workout in high heat, starting well hydrated, and no problem finish 2L during and right after the workout, with another 1L in the hour or two after. (Not straight H2O). Hunting scenarios - I use up to 10L a day during Elk season. Yes - I piss a lot, but that's what works best for me keeping hydrated and energy up and not feeling like crap.

Some people may be acclimated to using less water - but that's not everyone.
 
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