Rokslide First aid kit

Mike Islander

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Aug 10, 2019
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Tourniquet, blood clotting powder, and large bandage in lid of pack and one in my bino harness. Some strong fabric "Bandaids" and antibiotic ointment handy. I've carried sutures on jungle trips, but never used them. So basically what I have above covers my kit, excluding "meds" (antihistamine, NSAIDS, pain meds, sleep aids, caffeine pills, antibiotic pills).
 

jakelogsdon

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Feb 1, 2020
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Been seeing The CAT in a lot of civilian first aid kits. I would venture to guess that most people don't understand exactly what they're dealing with. I would also venture to guess that most people would probably do more harm than good without getting some form of training in tourniquet application and use. This shit can be very dangerous.
 
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Fatcamp

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Been seeing The CAT in a lot of civilian first aid kits. I would venture to guess that most people don't understand exactly what they're dealing with. I would also venture to guess that most people would probably do more harm than good without getting some form of training in tourniquet application and use. This shit can be very dangerous.
In an ideal world people would be responsible enough to at least self-educate when utilizing tourniquets. It's really not that tough. The links I posted on the previous page are a good start.

That said, even if people don't know the details it's not that difficult, and there is no replacement. If someone has uncontrolled bleeding it's not like they will make it worse with the proper tools, and often the thought is that someone present will know what they are doing.

Two thoughts, understanding when to use a tourniquet is really important, and knowing to never release one once it is applied is as well.
 

Mike Islander

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This ^^^

The biggest misconception is that you need to remove it periodically to keep the limb from dying. First, bleeding out and the patient dying is worse than losing a limb. And second, limbs can live for many, many hours with a tourniquet applied, far longer than many people think.
 

jakelogsdon

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Feb 1, 2020
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This ^^^

The biggest misconception is that you need to remove it periodically to keep the limb from dying. First, bleeding out and the patient dying is worse than losing a limb. And second, limbs can live for many, many hours with a tourniquet applied, far longer than many people think.
In an ideal world people would be responsible enough to at least self-educate when utilizing tourniquets. It's really not that tough. The links I posted on the previous page are a good start.

That said, even if people don't know the details it's not that difficult, and there is no replacement. If someone has uncontrolled bleeding it's not like they will make it worse with the proper tools, and often the thought is that someone present will know what they are doing.

Two thoughts, understanding when to use a tourniquet is really important, and knowing to never release one once it is applied is as well.
Spoken like pros.
 

RyanC

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Feb 7, 2013
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250
You also don't want to be afraid to place a tourniquet because your not sure if it is warranted. Even if necessary you should make every effort to convert a tourniquet to a lesser means of hemorrhage control in the first 2 hours...like hemostatic gauze and pressure dressing. If tourniquet conversion fails at 2 hours, try again near the 6 hour mark. If it fails again at 6 hrs.....leave it. Last note......if you are successful in converting to packing the wound and a pressure dressing, don't remove the tourniquet, just loosen it and keep it in place in case you need to tighten it again.

Oh yeah and as stated above....NEVER loosen a tourniquet just to "get blood flow to the lower portion of the limb"...It doesn't work like that.

Cheers.
 

jakelogsdon

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Feb 1, 2020
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A few points to make.
1. The majority of external haemorrhage can be controlled by direct pressure.
2. An incorrectly applied tourniquet will actually cause increased bleeding from distal soft tissue injuries and damaged arteries.
3. A properly applied tourniquet is painful and this can lead to inadequate tightening.
4. Continuous application for longer than 2 h can result in permanent nerve injury, muscle injury, vascular injury and skin necrosis.
 
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