Rookie Question

RadDad

Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2022
Messages
90
Location
NorCal
I’m just getting into big game hunting after a lifetime of bird hunting. Scopes are totally new to me so I’m doing my best to learn everything I can to effectively use the one I have. My scope, a Vortex Viper HSLR 4-16x50 has the handy BDC reticle. As I understand it, the elevation hashes adjust for 1.5, 4.5, and 7.5 MOA from the center down when holding over.

Here comes the rookie question; how does magnification affect this? I believe each hash adjusts the MOA mentioned above when the scope is at full magnification. Does that mean I would double the MOA drop at half the magnification? In other words, if I’m at 8 magnification (on my 4-16) on my scope, does that mean the first hash is now 3 MOA?

My apologies if this has been asked before. I wasn’t even sure how to search this.

Thanks,

RadDad
 

Grillnugz

Newbie
Joined
Jul 20, 2022
Messages
8
I've always been a bit disappointed with BDC reticles. They can work, but the hold overs change with the magnification setting in SFP scopes and are often at random distances to begin with. More to mess up. I'd go with a simple duplex and sight in the rifle for a maximum point plank range of 6 to 8".
 

JFK

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
424
If you are new to hunting you’d be better served by simplifying things. 16x is a ton of magnification….more than I’d want on a hunting scope and more than you’ll want for the vast majority of shots on game. I’d forget about holding over and/or dialing for a little bit and go kill some stuff at 100-250 yards. The math you are trying to figure out is fine at the range shooting paper but isn’t a good thing to rely on in the heat of the moment. Animals don’t often present shots at even yardages, making bdc reticles of little use. A solid 3x9 will simplify everything.
 
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RadDad

RadDad

Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2022
Messages
90
Location
NorCal
I've always been a bit disappointed with BDC reticles. They can work, but the hold overs change with the magnification setting in SFP scopes and are often at random distances to begin with. More to mess up. I'd go with a simple duplex and sight in the rifle for a maximum point plank range of 6 to 8".
I already have the scope (and I do love it so far) so the duplex isn’t an option at this point. Sounds like relying on my turrets and not the BDC is my best bet. Appreciate the suggestion.
 
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RadDad

RadDad

Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2022
Messages
90
Location
NorCal
If you are new to hunting you’d be better served by simplifying things. 16x is a ton of magnification….more than I’d want on a hunting scope and more than you’ll want for the vast majority of shots on game. I’d forget about holding over and/or dialing for a little bit and go kill some stuff at 100-250 yards. The math you are trying to figure out is fine at the range shooting paper but isn’t a good thing to rely on in the heat of the moment. Animals don’t often present shots at even yardages, making bdc reticles of little use. A solid 3x9 will simplify everything.
I guess I should have provided some context about the rifle and my intended hunting. I’m going to be hunting in Idaho and California with a 7mm Rem Mag. My hope in getting this scope was to have the ability to poke out a ways if an (ethical) opportunity presented itself as my hunting/shooting ability progressed. I thought the BDC would provide some sort of guideline, mostly at closer ranges, for shots that need to be made quickly. Sounds like my best bet is to rely on my turrets if I really need to get out there. I doubt I’ll get to that point soon but want to be ready/educated just in case.

Appreciate the feedback.
 

RS_Non-Res

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 1, 2021
Messages
221
[...] sight in the rifle for a maximum point plank range of 6 to 8".
I have a Nikon BDC on an old 300wsm. It's zeroed at some weird distance to maximize the point blank range (e.g. anything under 350 yds is point and shoot), Beyond that I have a printed table of "BDC hashmark & ranges at max zoom" taped to the buttstock, which I suppose that I'll have time to use if the critter is farther away.
 

Grillnugz

Newbie
Joined
Jul 20, 2022
Messages
8
I have a Nikon BDC on an old 300wsm. It's zeroed at some weird distance to maximize the point blank range (e.g. anything under 350 yds is point and shoot), Beyond that I have a printed table of "BDC hashmark & ranges at max zoom" taped to the buttstock, which I suppose that I'll have time to use if the critter is farther away.
I have a friend who loves the Nikon BDC and has used Nikon scopes with the app with great results, elk at 400y+ with a 300 win. But I have not had good repeatable results in my personal shooting with BDC. I guess the take away is practice and stick to a system, there are many ways to skin the cat
 
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