Roosevelt Elk with a bow Guided or Unguided?

Huntforever

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
45
I'm wanting to chase Roosevelt elk this year or the next. I'm trying to decide on a DIY hunt or Guided. I have DIY experience chasing elk in Utah and Colorado. I've perfered DIY elk hunts but Roosevelt hunting seems quite different. I would really like opinions on the matter?

Thanks
 

couesbitten

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
1,723
Location
East Wenatchee, WA
Just go! Yes, the terrain is a little different and the areas the inhabit can be rain forest jungles, but they're still elk. They may not be quite as vocal as the Rocky Mountain elk, but don't be intimidated. Do some research, pick your area and do it. If I was in your shoes, I'd be looking at Oregon hunting units.
 
OP
Huntforever

Huntforever

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
45
Are there areas in Oregon that are roadless that would limit accessible?
 

wildwilderness

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
Messages
1,589
Location
Eagle River, AK
Does anyone know of private land options to go DIY? I have heard in the past timber companies may allow hunting for a fee?

Also are there any “landowner” type tags for better units for Rosies?
 

buzzy

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 10, 2013
Messages
420
if you go guided talk to Ken Wilson of Spoon Creek Outfitters. You won’t be disappointed.
 

roosiebull

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 23, 2014
Messages
3,285
Location
oregon coast
Are there areas in Oregon that are roadless that would limit accessible?
easy access timber company property that allows access will pretty much be busy, NF land that's easy to access or navigate will have pressure.... it doesn't need to be roadless to limit hunting pressure, it's pretty easy to get away from people in many NF areas, people don't want to deal with it, and just keep packing into timber company property.

it's gotten pretty ridiculous pressure wise, but there is still a ton of country with very light pressure all season. seriously, nobody wants to start covering ground cross country on NF land, it's a pain in the ass, constantly, but if you just accept it is what it is and don't feel sorry for yourself, you can have a lot of country to yourself to do whatever you want without hunter interference.

look at areas of NF land that isn't close to main highways that lead to the busiest parts of the state. the coast, between big highways that lead to heavily populated valley towns are your best bet, and as far west as possible... the NF land right on the coast is extra thick and nasty, go east a few miles and the underbrush isn't so daunting, and pressure increases on NF.

i have pretty much shifted my efforts into those areas, because i don't mind hard walking, but do mind the hoards of new hunters that watch BRO videos and chase you around bugling at you, or destination elk and copy Corey, even though he can't figure the coast out.

as far as the habits of roosies, like someone mentioned, they are elk, they act like elk, don't overthink that aspect... they don't have very big home ranges, so if you find areas with lots of historical elk sign, break out the topo map and try to figure out areas close that they will likely live (topos are essential tools for NF land roosie hunting, satellite images are largely useless in most areas) wind is trickier on the coast, because we have less thermals and more directional wind, but thermals still play a role, but that roll is mostly to screw up a decent wind ;) the country is really broken, which makes the wind a mess too... it's not that big of a deal, but you need to be patient sometimes when you don't want to be.

about everything has thorns, and you will too after opening day.... dense marine layers (fog) will soak the brush overnight, and walking through it will get you more wet than if it was raining... it's not always like that, but prepare to get soaked.... it's the little things that add up and people get frustrated, especially since you can't see the elk most of the time.... you have to just become desensitized by the little stuff, keep your head up, keep a good attitude, and stay in the game.... it's not that bad.

there is plenty of opportunity to do little overnight or couple day backpack trips too, so you aren't covering so much ground per day.

as bad as people make it out to be, it would take a pretty special elk tag to get me off the coast in Sept, i love chasing roosies. we plan on moving to Wyoming in a few years, and i will still come back and hunt the first week over here every year, regardless of how good of elk hunting i find, i like chasing roosies, and nothing will replace seeing those black antlers coming through the ferns or salmonberry, and the too close encounters.

if you have any specific questions, feel free to reach out, i will try to help as much as i can. i won't be very specific on areas, but there is a lot of good country on the coast, but anything tactical, i'm willing to share, i have done a bunch of it..... you don't need a guide if you didn't need a guide hunting elk in other areas. there are only a couple people in this state that are worth paying to guide.
 

KennethDeemer

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2021
Messages
37
easy access timber company property that allows access will pretty much be busy, NF land that's easy to access or navigate will have pressure.... it doesn't need to be roadless to limit hunting pressure, it's pretty easy to get away from people in many NF areas, people don't want to deal with it, and just keep packing into timber company property.

it's gotten pretty ridiculous pressure wise, but there is still a ton of country with very light pressure all season. seriously, nobody wants to start covering ground cross country on NF land, it's a pain in the ass, constantly, but if you just accept it is what it is and don't feel sorry for yourself, you can have a lot of country to yourself to do whatever you want without hunter interference.

look at areas of NF land that isn't close to main highways that lead to the busiest parts of the state. the coast, between big highways that lead to heavily populated valley towns are your best bet, and as far west as possible... the NF land right on the coast is extra thick and nasty, go east a few miles and the underbrush isn't so daunting, and pressure increases on NF.

i have pretty much shifted my efforts into those areas, because i don't mind hard walking, but do mind the hoards of new hunters that watch BRO videos and chase you around bugling at you, or destination elk and copy Corey, even though he can't figure the coast out.

as far as the habits of roosies, like someone mentioned, they are elk, they act like elk, don't overthink that aspect... they don't have very big home ranges, so if you find areas with lots of historical elk sign, break out the topo map and try to figure out areas close that they will likely live (topos are essential tools for NF land roosie hunting, satellite images are largely useless in most areas) wind is trickier on the coast, because we have less thermals and more directional wind, but thermals still play a role, but that roll is mostly to screw up a decent wind ;) the country is really broken, which makes the wind a mess too... it's not that big of a deal, but you need to be patient sometimes when you don't want to be.

about everything has thorns, and you will too after opening day.... dense marine layers (fog) will soak the brush overnight, and walking through it will get you more wet than if it was raining... it's not always like that, but prepare to get soaked.... it's the little things that add up and people get frustrated, especially since you can't see the elk most of the time.... you have to just become desensitized by the little stuff, keep your head up, keep a good attitude, and stay in the game.... it's not that bad.

there is plenty of opportunity to do little overnight or couple day backpack trips too, so you aren't covering so much ground per day.

as bad as people make it out to be, it would take a pretty special elk tag to get me off the coast in Sept, i love chasing roosies. we plan on moving to Wyoming in a few years, and i will still come back and hunt the first week over here every year, regardless of how good of elk hunting i find, i like chasing roosies, and nothing will replace seeing those black antlers coming through the ferns or salmonberry, and the too close encounters.

if you have any specific questions, feel free to reach out, i will try to help as much as i can. i won't be very specific on areas, but there is a lot of good country on the coast, but anything tactical, i'm willing to share, i have done a bunch of it..... you don't need a guide if you didn't need a guide hunting elk in other areas. there are only a couple people in this state that are worth paying to guide.
Pure gold here - love seeing hunters help other hunters. So much knowledge on this site, people miss so much of it by trying to go the shortcut route and ask for units/roads and walk right past gold like this.
 

Indian Summer

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Messages
1,849
Don’t book with Olympic Mountain Outfitters if they’re still in business. I can give you a few good places for diy hunting near Rosburg and Toledo if you’re interested.
 
OP
Huntforever

Huntforever

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
45
That's some great information and very helpful!! I'll look at most definitely
 

Dirtscoots

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Oct 1, 2019
Messages
154
Location
Oregon
This year will be the first year the east side of the state is goin draw. Western Oregon will be nearly the only over the counter elk hunting. I’m assuming that will increase already high pressure. There are lots of elk. If you can get away from people. Yes there are private land companies that sell permits to hunt their properties. You would be wasting your money. The pressure is higher with morons bugling out of their pickup every ridge then if you hike into state land. Find somewhere vehicle access is not allowed is more important then if there are roads.
 

cgasner1

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 12, 2015
Messages
865
if you go guided talk to Ken Wilson of Spoon Creek Outfitters. You won’t be disappointed.

These guys get it done I grew up 20 minutes down the road Kenny and Ross know why they are doing


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

riversidejeep

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 15, 2021
Messages
143
Location
Far northwestern Komifornia
easy access timber company property that allows access will pretty much be busy, NF land that's easy to access or navigate will have pressure.... it doesn't need to be roadless to limit hunting pressure, it's pretty easy to get away from people in many NF areas, people don't want to deal with it, and just keep packing into timber company property.

it's gotten pretty ridiculous pressure wise, but there is still a ton of country with very light pressure all season. seriously, nobody wants to start covering ground cross country on NF land, it's a pain in the ass, constantly, but if you just accept it is what it is and don't feel sorry for yourself, you can have a lot of country to yourself to do whatever you want without hunter interference.

look at areas of NF land that isn't close to main highways that lead to the busiest parts of the state. the coast, between big highways that lead to heavily populated valley towns are your best bet, and as far west as possible... the NF land right on the coast is extra thick and nasty, go east a few miles and the underbrush isn't so daunting, and pressure increases on NF.

i have pretty much shifted my efforts into those areas, because i don't mind hard walking, but do mind the hoards of new hunters that watch BRO videos and chase you around bugling at you, or destination elk and copy Corey, even though he can't figure the coast out.

as far as the habits of roosies, like someone mentioned, they are elk, they act like elk, don't overthink that aspect... they don't have very big home ranges, so if you find areas with lots of historical elk sign, break out the topo map and try to figure out areas close that they will likely live (topos are essential tools for NF land roosie hunting, satellite images are largely useless in most areas) wind is trickier on the coast, because we have less thermals and more directional wind, but thermals still play a role, but that roll is mostly to screw up a decent wind ;) the country is really broken, which makes the wind a mess too... it's not that big of a deal, but you need to be patient sometimes when you don't want to be.

about everything has thorns, and you will too after opening day.... dense marine layers (fog) will soak the brush overnight, and walking through it will get you more wet than if it was raining... it's not always like that, but prepare to get soaked.... it's the little things that add up and people get frustrated, especially since you can't see the elk most of the time.... you have to just become desensitized by the little stuff, keep your head up, keep a good attitude, and stay in the game.... it's not that bad.

there is plenty of opportunity to do little overnight or couple day backpack trips too, so you aren't covering so much ground per day.

as bad as people make it out to be, it would take a pretty special elk tag to get me off the coast in Sept, i love chasing roosies. we plan on moving to Wyoming in a few years, and i will still come back and hunt the first week over here every year, regardless of how good of elk hunting i find, i like chasing roosies, and nothing will replace seeing those black antlers coming through the ferns or salmonberry, and the too close encounters.

if you have any specific questions, feel free to reach out, i will try to help as much as i can. i won't be very specific on areas, but there is a lot of good country on the coast, but anything tactical, i'm willing to share, i have done a bunch of it..... you don't need a guide if you didn't need a guide hunting elk in other areas. there are only a couple people in this state that are worth paying to guide.
He forgot to mention that if you cant find the elk you can always wing shoot a few mosquitoes for dinner.
 

Spittard

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2019
Messages
47
Location
Oregon Coast
For what is worth, these elk never seem to travel far, I have bumped bulls and stayed out of area for a few days came back in and find them usually very close to where they originally were as long it is hard to reach. or over looked. IE terrain, steep, thick etc. go find the fresh sign and don't be afraid to move in and make a play given the conditions are right. people on the part of the coast I am from usually go balls out the first week and then its pretty much just the locals grinding it out. If you don't quit and keep a optimistic outlook even when things seem shitty you will be surprised how fun Rosie hunting can be.
 
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