Saddle pads.......

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robtattoo

robtattoo

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Mar 22, 2014
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i would add neoprene girths to that list, too

Yeah, not knowing any better, even I figured out that neoprene would be sweaty! My cinch is fleece lined cordura, rear girth is leather.
 

Mtaylor

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Oct 6, 2014
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123
Neopreme is definitely sweaty, and some horses will crow hop with neopreme, (my mare would all the time). Sounds like you have a good pad situation, so my advice is to stay away from neopreme cinches and go with a mohair cinch.

I’m looking at getting back in riding too after several years.
Good luck Rob!

MT
 

khart_6882

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Mar 20, 2019
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Agreed with most the previous posts, natural fibers work best in my experience for both pads and cinch’s. If your trail riding/packing you pretty much can’t over pad a horse or mule. The only time I try to keep my pads minimal is if I have my horse in great shape and his withers are thinned up. Also when roping fully grown cows or bulls as the slightly lower saddle height from a thinner pad helps with leverage when dallied off. Hope this helps!
 

wysongdog

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May 8, 2016
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We run a alpaca blanket under 5 star 1" wool pads. I bought my kids these pads and had 5 star personalize them with their initials and the pink breast cancer ribbons on them. They are awesome pads and people to work with. They are the one Christmas give that I gave my kids when they were littler that they still use. They aren't cheap by any means but really feel that they are pad that truly fits the "buy once cry once" thought process.
 

Nicklhead

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Jul 17, 2018
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Colorado
Felt pads work great. Make sure you have your horse or mule in shape before season. An out of shape animal gets sore and even the best fitting saddle will slip sideways. If they are sore. As for neoprene. I would only use a neoprene cinch if my animal has thin skin. I had a big Aran that I would have to use a neoprene cinch on with some Vaseline every morning at the start of the day. Worked great. Cheap Navajo blanket keep gear clean. Always check for pine needles don’t want a sharp one causing a redo in the mountains. Figure out how to tie up your animal over night too. I have a mule that I have to high line and hobble. I have gone from horses to mules just over the strength and sure footed nature. They do everything to protect themselves from getting hurt which in turn keeps you safe also. I can put on 8 miles in a day with my mules for 10 days without shoes and they walk fast compared to any horse I have ever hunted on. You’ll figure out what works with time just do some summer scouting on your horse to get them in shape and stay the night up in woods to find out their vices before you hunt or you can have a horrible hunt experience or be chasing a horse back to your trailer which is where they will go. I’ve had animals that liked the woods so much they would pull over at a hunting spot a year later without me even stealing them because they remember the different places you hunt if you hunt in the same place year after year. Fun stuff.


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wwy

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Apr 29, 2017
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Location
wyoming
I like fleece lined wool pads that are contoured. Depending on the shape and build of the horse I'll run the straight pad (fat or mutton withered), pad and single blanket (decent shape decent build), or the pad and double blanket (good shape and or high withered). With a well built saddle, built on a good tree, one of these combos should fit most horses well. I think anything other than a real mohair cinch is a gimmick/bandaid. Most cinches tabled "mohair" you see at the feed store contain a very low % of mohair and are mostly rayon. There is a huge difference. Cinch sores most often have to do with a junk cinch, poor fitting saddle/rigging, fat horse, or a bad rider/bad load. You can also over pad a horse to the point that the saddle fits very poorly and you have to over cinch the animal. Look for a uniform sweat (no dry spots) when you pull the saddle and adjust accordingly.
 

Mo muleskinner

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Feb 6, 2020
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I have mules and have been using the thick Wells 5 star pad with no blanket . They have a mule cut that fits a mule better. Have logged 20miles a day in the mountains . Saddle strays put and my mules are not made sore.
Uncle has a Tacky 2 he has no chance complaints about it.
 

Buckarooman17

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Apr 4, 2020
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One thing to keep in mind is you can definitely over pad a horse and that’s where you’ll sore them. It’s like you putting two wool socks on and putting your foot in your boots and expecting it to be comfy. I build custom saddles and have rode thousands of miles a horseback and something I’ve learned is get a pad that is softer and has some give, stiff pads are the worst. I run a coolback with a heavy Navajo on top everywhere I go whether it’s hunting or roping all day it’s about 3/4 inch. More than anything you want something that sweats them up evenly.
 

fort fireman

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Aug 3, 2015
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IMHO, stick with natural fiber over anything synthetic. Brand doesn’t matter but material does.
 

wysongdog

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May 8, 2016
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I like a good wool blanket that I can double up under my wool pad. I run a 3/4” wool 5 star pad. They are expensive but i’m a firm believer in buy once cry once. The blanket I have I bought at the denver stock show 18 years ago and it’s still solid. I’ve had to use it several times on trips where I got to far from camp and stayed out overnight. Kept me warmer lol. Made the night much more comfortable
 

ntrlbrnhunter

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Mar 29, 2019
Messages
403
Quality Wool pad, no blanket... I too love the 5 star brand...

I’m amazed how many people still use a pad and blanket....

Its a game changer investing and using a quality wool pad especially if you ride steep, rough country for a long time... it’s a game changer. Everything just stays put, no more adjusting blankets/pads
 

doverpack12

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Mar 6, 2013
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For those running a double blanket under a pad, what do you do with high withered horses that tend to make the blanket wrinkle? I have a pad with a wither cutout and feel like my horse needs that, wouldn't mind adding a blanket at times underneath but when I put one on the high withers make the blanket tough to fit without getting wrinkles.
 

stumpy waters

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May 24, 2017
Messages
47
For those running a double blanket under a pad, what do you do with high withered horses that tend to make the blanket wrinkle? I have a pad with a wither cutout and feel like my horse needs that, wouldn't mind adding a blanket at times underneath but when I put one on the high withers make the blanket tough to fit without getting wrinkles.

I use mayatex wool blankets underneath wool pads. I am not particular on the pad brand. I have southwest equine, weaver, professionals choice, reinsman, and oxbow pads. I don’t have any overly expensive ones, but the pads aren’t cheap regardless of brand. The wool blankets help keep the pads cleaner and are a lot easier to wash than the pads.

Regarding your question, at least in my case the mayatex blankets tend to conform to the horse. They will stretch a little and shape, especially when they get wet from sweat. I use the same on each horse every time, in the same direction for that reason.

If you have any problems with the blanket moving under the pad, put a small piece of the rubberized cabinet/drawer liner between them. I have one horse that then blanket wants to move. No issues on any others.
 
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