Secure your guy out lines

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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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I was told the CF pole is sturdy but not unbreakable. My Redcliff center pole strikes me as being not particularly stout and always had some flex/bend in it when the tipi shell was tight. An aluminum pole is quite a bit stronger I'm told.

And yes...guy-outs are mandatory to survive big hard winds and wet heavy snow. Just mark them somehow and be SURE you don't trip over them. They will put you on your face with injuries.
lol, better than a hitch on back of truck to shin, I suppose. I actually ordered the 8 man tipi pole, which is suppose to be more stout than the RC pole. I also got info on carrying a small piece or two of Alumn angle and some small hose clamps for those really really bad nights/days. I should've done a few things different for sure- all my fault here. But, never again, it was a miserable 2 hrs.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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I was able to discover the CF pole for the 8 man is way more robust, so I ordered that one up, and will cut it to correct length for the RC. This makes me feel a bit safer. I also cut and salvaged the pole that broke, and set the tipi up here at home. It is only about 3-4" shorter and still looks good. There were no tears or issues with the tipi and I was glad about that.
 

Kevin Dill

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Previous to the Redcliff my shelter was a Seek Outside 8-Man Tipi. My recollection of the center pole was that it was larger in diameter vs the Redcliff pole, and quite sturdy.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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MFlood, Is that tent a true conical shape?

I’ve had a tent collapse in 90mph winds on Kodiak…it sucks.

The best tent I own to handle the wind and the elements is my Tipi…. That thing sheds wind effortlessly And I didnt put center guy lines on mine.
Actually the floor is rectangular. This is why I got it, it was easy to stake the 4 corners in an emergency situation, then raise it up and climb in if necessary. But after the rectangular foot print is staked, it does take on a more traditional tipi appearance. It was all my fault, I left my extra stakes at home and had to rig the 3 guy outs facing the wind using cordage and 2 trees. There was likely flexing going on. But I will say the wind that broke it came and went like a cannon. Dead quiet to boom, then back to quiet. It was creepy.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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Previous to the Redcliff my shelter was a Seek Outside 8-Man Tipi. My recollection of the center pole was that it was larger in diameter vs the Redcliff pole, and quite sturdy.
Yep SO replied to a question and stated the 8 man is more robust, so I have that one coming and will cut it to size for my RC. Makes me feel better. I also found my extra stakes and put them in my stake bag.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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So just a final follow up on the redcliff pole situation: I received the new "8 Man" tipi pole set up from Seek Outside in less than a week, that I will modify and use for the Redcliff. It is way beefier and I am happy. I will eliminate 1 full pole section from it to get to smaller height needed. The weight difference between the redcliff pole and the 8 man pole (with 1 piece left out) is exactly 6 oz. How ever, I had to cut out a 6" section of the original redcliff as that is where it broke and cracked. I would imagine that would only be another oz or so.
So in my opinion I have a way better set up now for high winds, and only at a true 4-5 oz weight penalty. The packable length size area is almost identical as well. The Redcliff is in 5 packable sections where the 8 Man is in 3 packable ( the 6 poles pack inside each other making only 3).
 

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mfllood3800

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here is a pic of both pole sets bundles
 

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Beendare

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Glad you got it sorted out...and good info for others in harsh conditions.

Unfortunately, I've been there. If you haven't had a tent problem...you are extremely lucky.

Heres one for ya, Some buddies were on a caribou drop hunt. No trees to speak of. The only spot they could find that had any shelter from the wind was at the base of some hills in a little notch.
They set up their tent, and hiked up on top to glass. A big herd of caribou came through and when going after them they spooked them....right down the tight chute they go that ends at their tent...... mangling the tent they set up not 2 hours earlier.

Thats a tough one to explain to the next group that flew in and saw the whole thing.....

>
 

Kevin Dill

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Tipis work really well at shedding wind due to their shape. In any typical wind storm the higher wind speeds will be well above ground, and slower speeds closest to the ground. A tipi is of course wider at the bottom and narrow at the top, allowing it to 'catch' less wind with its profile. Any strong winds hitting it tend to get pushed upward from the wider bottom toward the narrower top with less resistance.

The only wind negative I've seen with my tipis has been a tendency for the windward side to 'cave' in really harsh winds and strong gusts. That caving stresses the center pole a lot. Adding staked guy-outs and keeping the entire pitch taut is how you get a tipi to maximally shed wind...and protect your center pole in the process.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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Glad you got it sorted out...and good info for others in harsh conditions.

Unfortunately, I've been there. If you haven't had a tent problem...you are extremely lucky.

Heres one for ya, Some buddies were on a caribou drop hunt. No trees to speak of. The only spot they could find that had any shelter from the wind was at the base of some hills in a little notch.
They set up their tent, and hiked up on top to glass. A big herd of caribou came through and when going after them they spooked them....right down the tight chute they go that ends at their tent...... mangling the tent they set up not 2 hours earlier.

Thats a tough one to explain to the next group that flew in and saw the whole thing.....

>
what are the odds. That is crazy and turns a great hunt into a shelter building survival experience. I hope they were able to call out to the outfitter and get picked back up or figure out a new shelter some how.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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Tipis work really well at shedding wind due to their shape. In any typical wind storm the higher wind speeds will be well above ground, and slower speeds closest to the ground. A tipi is of course wider at the bottom and narrow at the top, allowing it to 'catch' less wind with its profile. Any strong winds hitting it tend to get pushed upward from the wider bottom toward the narrower top with less resistance.

The only wind negative I've seen with my tipis has been a tendency for the windward side to 'cave' in really harsh winds and strong gusts. That caving stresses the center pole a lot. Adding staked guy-outs and keeping the entire pitch taut is how you get a tipi to maximally shed wind...and protect your center pole in the process.
I appreciate you and Beendare sharing your experiences. I have only been in really high winds a handful of times, and figured the tipis are strong enough. After this experience I realize nothing is and there is always that chance for a freak wind shear, or what ever, that can dismantle any situation. I try to have multiple safety plans for my hunts as I always hunt solo, and it's unforgiving in the high elevation. I have had snowmobile trips that left me stranded and if it wasn't for having plans B,C and D's I might not be here typing this.
My wife says it's time to stop hunting high and hunt down low. She may be right.
Anyway thanks Kevin and Beendare for your insight, hopefully others will benefit.
Big shout out to Seek Outside for such quick service as well. I can finish my rifle spike hunt as I have day left. Then on to Muzzle loader.
 

Beendare

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Yours is a good lesson to share.

I've seen guys have problems with the heat from their stove pipe weaken their center pole- its a factor. Could potentially be a big factor with a carbon pole...much like heating the inserts in a carbon shaft.

I can typically cut a lodgepole in the lower 48...and just bring my strong aluminum pole on drop camps in Ak. I too like a stronger pole

Tents and Tipis expand and contract with the temps....especially with a stove.

In strong wind its pretty important to keep it tight so it sheds the wind. Big floppy section catch the wind. If I tighten mine up, then use the stove, it makes the tipi tight as a drum...putting a lot of stress on the center pole....worth monitoring.

I used more seams and smaller sections along with a little bit heavier fabric....so my tipi sags less than the commercial Kifaru/Seek stuff....the negative is its 1.25# heavier- so I have little to no problems with sag.

IMO,
A guy with the Kifaru or Seek tent/tipi will want to monitor the issues above and adjust as necessary for best performance.

>
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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In strong wind its pretty important to keep it tight so it sheds the wind. Big floppy section catch the wind. If I tighten mine up, then use the stove, it makes the tipi tight as a drum...putting a lot of stress on the center pole....worth monitoring.

Looks like I may have to carry my Sven with me. I used to carry it and stopped cause I could break my own wood for the stove. But using it to cut a center pole, for me, is now something I need to have as an option.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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Finally set the tipi just to ensure the mods were all working.
Looks good to me and sets as it should. Ready for the next adventure.
 

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Kevin Dill

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Looks good. A few tips on the Redcliff: When staking the 4 corners, they need to be pulled fairly taut but not stretched real hard. After the pole goes in and up, stake the other points but do the doors last for the best pitch with least wrinkles or sag. Next: Guy-outs can be over-tightened which is revealed by a sag or collapse of the fabric panel below the guy-out point. Guy-outs should be just taut enough to stabilize the tipi shell...not deform it.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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Looks good. A few tips on the Redcliff: When staking the 4 corners, they need to be pulled fairly taut but not stretched real hard. After the pole goes in and up, stake the other points but do the doors last for the best pitch with least wrinkles or sag. Next: Guy-outs can be over-tightened which is revealed by a sag or collapse of the fabric panel below the guy-out point. Guy-outs should be just taut enough to stabilize the tipi shell...not deform it.
Thanks Kevin. I went around and adjusted every stake and that's what I ended up with (in pic)
I usually pull the 4 corners and the release a little tension. Then run up pole. Then go to ends and pull tight and release a little. Then I go to the doors. Then guy outs.
What may have got me was at first I staked it with a lift of the skirt using small cord at stake loops. But changed it to tight using the stake loops. The guy outs I just pulled tight to get room inside.
I'll try what you said more specifically- thx.
 

Dos Perros

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Adding another Redcliff guy-out anecdote.

A couple weeks ago the wind picked up in the middle of the night, 20mph with maybe 30mph gusts. My Redcliff is pretty new to me, never used in windy conditions. I had all guy outs secure except the one that was supporting the side taking the brunt of the wind. I got up in the night and fashioned a guy out and secured that side and the difference was night and day. The shelter was stout and hardly moved and withstood the wind very well.
 

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