September elk hunt boot

Marble

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May 29, 2019
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How much thinsulate should I have for my September elk hunt hiking boots?


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Bring two pairs.

One non insulated and one with either 200 primaloft or 400 thinsulate.

I have other boots with more insulating but very rarely will wear them.

Weather that time of year can be very mild to low 20s and snow.

This year I had two days i wore my insulated boots in Sept elk hunting. The rest of the month was non insulated.

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roosiebull

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Aug 23, 2014
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oregon coast
I don’t own any insulated boots, and it’s very rare when I wish I did. I will go against the crispi suggestion and give props to zamberlan, between my wife and I, we have 4 pairs, and they have been awesome.

I have had 3 pairs of crispi, thought I found “my boots” first pair were the summits, which were awesome, but around here, synthetic panels mean water intrusion… no getting around it, some type of thorns from coastal brush will make them leak.

I figured the Nevada would be that perfect boot, but the fit was completely different, and my 3rd pair fit different than the other 2 and I was getting heel rub with them… I wanted to like crispi, but their varying fit with no description of the fit, I gave up on them.

zamberlan has a good size/fit chart, pretty safe to buy sight unseen, and you can try different models with a baseline for fit… on top of that, they have been the most durable boots, and I’m sticking with zamberlan
 

Laelkhunter

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Aug 26, 2013
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1,839
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New Orleans, La.
I have the Crispi Idaho (uninsulated), and had a pair of 200 gram Crispi Hunter for colder weather. I sold the Hunter, and now have Crispi Wild Rock with 400 gram insulation for sitting in a stand, or hunting in the snow. I wanted a little more insulation just in case.
 

Brooks

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Mar 19, 2019
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432
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New Mexico
Uninsulated Lowa Tibet GTX for humping the rough terrain here in NM from Sept until it gets cold then Kenetrek 1000 gram. Both are great boots for rough, steep terrain.
 

crich

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Joined
Jul 7, 2018
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421
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OH living in AK
What crispis? Colorados or Nevada’s?


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I like the guide gtx boot because of the height personally. I've done some downright foolish things in that boot and moved at a pace over types of terrain that would surely break my ankle or tear something in a lesser boot. I did it knowing that if I rolled on a rock or log that the boot would save my ankle and it has on countless occasions.
 

crich

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Joined
Jul 7, 2018
Messages
421
Location
OH living in AK
I don’t own any insulated boots, and it’s very rare when I wish I did. I will go against the crispi suggestion and give props to zamberlan, between my wife and I, we have 4 pairs, and they have been awesome.

I have had 3 pairs of crispi, thought I found “my boots” first pair were the summits, which were awesome, but around here, synthetic panels mean water intrusion… no getting around it, some type of thorns from coastal brush will make them leak.

I figured the Nevada would be that perfect boot, but the fit was completely different, and my 3rd pair fit different than the other 2 and I was getting heel rub with them… I wanted to like crispi, but their varying fit with no description of the fit, I gave up on them.

zamberlan has a good size/fit chart, pretty safe to buy sight unseen, and you can try different models with a baseline for fit… on top of that, they have been the most durable boots, and I’m sticking with zamberlan
Just curious what about the Crispi fit didnt work and how do the zamberlans feel comparatively?
 

Newtosavage

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Sep 20, 2018
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6,207
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In someone's favorite spot
How much thinsulate should I have for my September elk hunt hiking boots?


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I don't have insulated boots at all, and I have hunted above 9k feet in October the past two years, including last year when we got 15" of snow and single digits for the entire 2nd season. But YMMV as they say. I guess it really depends on how much you expect to be moving and how cold your feet usually get.

I think I just got used to having cold feet when I was a kid, hunting in the winter with athletic socks and tennis shoes (because that's all I had). None of us had hunting boots, much less insulated boots. I just don't even notice cold feet anymore.

If you're hunting on your feet, chances are insulation is just going to make your feet sweat and then you'll have even colder feet when you stop moving.

One pair of Smartwool socks in my Lowa Renegades did exceptionally well for me this year.
 

roosiebull

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Joined
Aug 23, 2014
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2,603
Location
oregon coast
Just curious what about the Crispi fit didnt work and how do the zamberlans feel comparatively?
The thing that didn’t work for me is no fit standard, every model I have bought fit different. It may not be an issue to others, but I have to buy sight unseen, no place to try them on. If they had a size chart like zamberlan, they would be better off.

Zamberlan has a good size chart and a description of each last they use, so when you do get your size dialed in, you are good to go with any boots that use that last.
 

OregonSteeler

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Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
147
Location
Portland, OR
The thing that didn’t work for me is no fit standard, every model I have bought fit different. It may not be an issue to others, but I have to buy sight unseen, no place to try them on. If they had a size chart like zamberlan, they would be better off.

Zamberlan has a good size chart and a description of each last they use, so when you do get your size dialed in, you are good to go with any boots that use that last.
Since it says OR Coast in your handle; G4 Archery in North Plains has Crispi boots to try on. That's where I got mine and it was nice to compare, feel, look, and try on their different boots to make a selection. There's just some things such as boots I do not want to buy online.
 

Eyeman

Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2021
Messages
62
Like some of the others have said.
Me: Crispi Colorado no insulation
Merino wool socks. Lightweight, medium and heavy depending on the temps usually does me good.
For real late cold with snow I have kennetrecks with 400 grams and the same sock setup.
 

Lukeutley7

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2021
Messages
21
Thanks all for the recommendations! Picked up some Kenetrek non-insulated. Now to find the right socks.
 

Rampaige

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2019
Messages
40
Thanks all for the recommendations! Picked up some Kenetrek non-insulated. Now to find the right socks.
I brought 2 pairs of light Merino socks and 2 pairs of heavy merino socks. Most of the time the light was fine. The only time my feet got cold was glassing in the morning. The temperature swings are faster there than back East where I'm from, so I didn't seem to stay cold long. I'm not sure what the temp was, but my Nalgene had ice form in it every morning but one. I kept a rotation going: I'd wear a pair or two on one day, hang them in camp to dry the next. I have cold feet, but its because they sweat a lot. So when I move they over heat, when I stop they freeze. Uninsulated boots for me, too.
 

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