Simulated Elevation Training

Lawnboi

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Mouthguards work well too.

Good way to give yourself a real bad headache at the end of the day!

Don't know if it helps or not, I have run with the mouthguard a bit and it does place added stress on the lungs that's for sure

Id be curious to hear what a real expert has to say about this kind of stuff
 

Ozz08

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I could never get away with wearing one of those. I get weird looks while on my traing hike here in the foothills with my loaded T1 as it is. I can just imagine all the yuppies faces if I added that mask to the equation. I am curious to know what the difference between that $80 mask in your link and the other $20 masks they have on amazon.
 

Broken Arrow

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Grain valley, Mo
Save your $$$ the air at elavation is thinner with less oyegen you can't simulate that at sea level. The composition of your blood actually changes nothing us flatlanders can do but be in the best shape we can and acclimate. Restricting your air is harmful. You wouldn't put a plastic bag over your head with just a small hole in it would you????
 

Trout bum

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Hey Pilgrim (had to),
Not sure about the mask but with Pike's Peak down the road one alternative option could be to hit it up for elevation training. Some runners ramping up for the ascent or the marathon on the peak do 3-2-1 training. They drive to the top at 14110ft and run or walk down 3 miles and back up. Then repeat 2 miles down and back up and 1 mile down and up. Great high altitude 12 mile fitness test all between the summit and 10500 ft. Lots of variations available. Incline plus a trek/run to Barr camp 6800ft-10500ft and back is also a good burn for sure (roughly 12 miles and doable year round). All fun stuff relatively close that you probably already knew about.
 

ohhiitznik

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Save your $$$ the air at elavation is thinner with less oyegen you can't simulate that at sea level. The composition of your blood actually changes nothing us flatlanders can do but be in the best shape we can and acclimate. Restricting your air is harmful. You wouldn't put a plastic bag over your head with just a small hole in it would you????

Snorkel/Mouthguard training works, but not necessarily for elevation change. What it does do is allow your body to acclimate to more workload with less oxygen. Your anaerobic output will increase, which can help you. But all the snorkel training in the world won't stave off AMS or Hypoxia from elevation. It will just let you work harder with less oxygen available.
 
OP
Pilgrim

Pilgrim

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Save your $$$ the air at elavation is thinner with less oyegen you can't simulate that at sea level. The composition of your blood actually changes nothing us flatlanders can do but be in the best shape we can and acclimate. Restricting your air is harmful. You wouldn't put a plastic bag over your head with just a small hole in it would you????

While I partially agree with your point, I've done some more research...

What actually happens when you conduct simulated elevation training, regardless of method, is this: your body is working harder for oxygen. Since red blood cells carry oxygen, this extra work load triggers the production of red blood cells. Thus, the more red blood cells you have; the more oxygen there is reaching your muscle fibers.

Now, unless this becomes a regimented routine used to keep your red blood cell count up, it's not going to really benefit anything. Doing this regularly for a month or so before heading to the high country might actually help matters.

Also, this is abnormal stress on the lungs/body. That being said, be smart. Creating red blood cells requires A LOT of water. Hydrate far more than normal.

Hey Pilgrim (had to)...

Hey man, it's all good!
 
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Pilgrim

Pilgrim

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I meant to add in that last comment:

I don't think I'll be buying into any of this simulated elevation training.
 

Moe.JKU

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British Columbia
I found the best training for that is swimming. I know its weird, but your lungs get strong. Although I do live in the rockies so our swimming pools are probably higher than most.
 

jmez

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Piedmont, SD
I agree Moe, it is the only exercise I do where I truly get that feeling that I can't get enough air. I think it is because you are literally holding your breath half the time you are exercising.
 

shaun

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I found the best training for that is swimming. I know its weird, but your lungs get strong. Although I do live in the rockies so our swimming pools are probably higher than most.

Never thought of that! Goin to have to give it a shot
 

Darren Best

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North Idaho
Save your money, there are ways to accomplish your goal without investing in something like that.

Swimming does help with your breathing by doing two things, one the water exerts pressure on your torso making you work harder to breath and second you pace your breathing.

The biggest problem people face is panic breathing, they don't breath heavy enough at the outset of hard exertion and then by the time the body realizes it needs extra oxygen they start panic breathing.

To learn to control this instinctively do something called breathing ladders.

A couple of good ways to work in breathing ladders is with burpees, swings and clean and presses.

Do one burpee, stop and take one breath in through your nose and out your mouth. Do two burpees, stop and take two breathes in your nose and out your mouth. Keep climbing the ladder until you have difficulty in controlling your breathing. Rest and repeat as many sets as needed. This can also be done the same way with kettlebell swings.

For upper body breathing ladders, do clean and presses with either a kettlebell, dumbbell or a barbell. Starting the the weight on the floor, clean and press it one rep, breath in the nose and out the mouth once. If using a kettlebell or dumbbell switch hands and do one rep and one breathe. Then back to the start hand, two reps and two breathes. On up the ladder you go until you are breathing hard. Rest and do as many sets as needed.

The goal here is to teach yourself to "cheat" by breathing deeper and slower to get more rest in between sets.

A variation of the breathing ladder using sprints would be like this.

Do a sprint at enough distance that you are breathing hard, walk back to your start line breathing in through your nose and out your mouth as deeply as possible. When you reach the start line immediately turn and sprint again and repeat. You may find that your sprint distance will start to decrease. Hill sprints doing this will work also and work wonders for your climbing power.
 

Jager

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We are looking at using them in the MMA gym in the lead up to a fight, I am not convinced either way, but will be taking detailed notes on the boys when they get into full swing, will definitely be interesting to see either way.
 

2rocky

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Didn't follow the link but not advised to do it in public....

20111130__ssjm1201postfolo~1_GALLERY.JPG


San Jose police: Man who caused post office shutdown was jogger in unusual gear

By Lisa Fernandez

[email protected]
Posted: 12/01/2011 09:28:17 AM PST
Updated: 03/06/2012 02:44:59 PM PST

Click photo to enlarge
Long Hoang, 29, of San Jose wears cardio mask and weighted vest by... (Courtesy of Long Hoang)

Word to the wise: Maybe it's not the smartest thing to jog in what looks like a gas mask and body armor, and then jam a package in a post office box.

It could touch off what happened Tuesday at the busy San Jose post office on Lundy Avenue: a full-scale police response, complete with the bomb squad and a robot.
 

Jason Snyder

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Somewhere between here and there
If you read up on this, you actually derive the most benefit if you live at high altitude, and train at a lower altitude. I don't think that there's any way you are going to trigger and sustain the physiological changes that take place when you live at high altitude. No mask is going to trick your body into this in an hour long workout.

You can achieve the same thing by simply working harder during your intervals, and not like you're trying to commit Jihad while you're doing it. Remember, the three basic aspects of your cardio conditioning that you can change via workouts is:

1) VO2 Max by doing HIT/interval training
2) Lactate threshold by doing tempo work (75-80% of max HR)
3) Aerobic fitness, ie how hard can you work without going into anaerobic respiration which = much faster burnout.
 
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