So I discovered Fly Fishing.......

Coach529

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2016
Messages
230
Location
Idaho Panhandle
Moved to northern Idaho 2.5 years ago. Moved from North Dakota.

Never been much of a fisherman. We did not have many good lakes around and never really caught the bug for it.

Got a chance to go on a guided float on the St Joe with some buddies. I borrowed a rod from a coworker and picked up a general selection of flies. Had an amazing time, even though the fishing was pretty slow. Learned a ton, our guide had 25+ years of experience and was super patient with three totally green fisherman. Caught my first Cutthroat that day!!





Fast forward to a couple weeks ago, my wife surprised me for our 25th wedding anniversary. She bought me a complete set up.....rod/ reel, waders, boots and a net. Nothing special for gear....but a great way for me to see if this is something I want to do regularly. After a couple days of exploring the Coeur D Alene River area and fishing, I can say I am severely addicted.





Any advice on a forum like Rokslide, but geared towards fly fishing?
 
Last edited:

Fitzwho

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
330
Location
Midland, TX
It’s fun, and expensive as you want it to be.

I don’t get to do a lot if it, but I make the most of it when I can. I’ve caught more bonefish on the fly than I have trout.0696A7FB-01D9-488A-8914-59C9C7AB44B5.jpeg3395FC03-F80B-403F-9F8B-FCE19CB55F3E.jpegEF72A4CF-0C39-4C9D-AE5B-D940909CD36D.jpeg
 

DAOutfitters208

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2017
Messages
175
Location
Coeur d' Alene, ID
Do you have an addictive personality? If so stay away, fly fishing is addicting! There are so many amazing places to fish here in Northern Idaho. We are fortunate to have many great rivers to chase Cutthroat in. You were on one of the best, the North Fork of the Coeur d Alene is great, when the floaters are not out, and south you have the Kelly Fork of the Clearwater, my personal favorite. I won't even get started on the opportunities in Montana, as I would need to clear my schedule for the next few hours.
As far as gear goes, the best method I have found for fishing these rivers solo is a pontoon boat, when the conditions are suitable to float. It allows you to fish more water and is very similar to fishing from a drift boat. For these rivers a 5 weight and 6 weight rod will be perfect, yes you need 2 if anyone asks :)
Silverbow Fly shop is a great place to get info on local rivers, they release weekly fishing reports. I would also take a few more guided trips, because you can absorb so much information from guides, it really helps with the learning curve. Enjoy man, this is a great time of year to hit these rivers, but you can enjoy this hobby year round in Idaho!
 

Fitzwho

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
330
Location
Midland, TX
I haven’t found a general forum for fly fishing. There are some more locally (state) specific forums.
 

Nickofthewoods

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2018
Messages
244
Location
Colorado
Start tying flies now. I waited until 10 years into fly fishing before I started. It really won't save much money if at all but the satisfaction is worth it.
 

NJDiverDan

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2014
Messages
305
Location
Rigby, Idaho
The North American Fly Fishing Forum has the most traffic. There are some state specific forum like Big Fish Tackle that may be of help.

Oh, cannot say enough about Big Y Fly Co for flies etc. Fast shipping, great prices on flies and excellent quality. I do not have time to tie my own, so this is my go to source.

I fish down in the other end of our state. Been fly fishing since I was 11. One of my favorite things to do, but never have enough time.
 

PNWGATOR

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
850
Location
Rathdrum, ID
There is a ton of fly fishing in the region. Just go! The more you fish, the more you’ll learn. Use what your guide taught you. Learn to read water and how to effectively present the fly. Keep your fly and gesr selection simple. Figure out what bugs hatch and when on your home river and then figure out a simple system to emulate them. Then focus on how to fish them effectively. Get away from the roadside hole hopping as the cutties get pounded there. Browns and rainbows are crazy fun too. Then there’s steelhead...pike, bass...and carp...and the mother of all fly fishing addiction: sight fishing the salt. Enjoy the journey!
 
OP
Coach529

Coach529

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2016
Messages
230
Location
Idaho Panhandle
Do you have an addictive personality? If so stay away, fly fishing is addicting! There are so many amazing places to fish here in Northern Idaho. We are fortunate to have many great rivers to chase Cutthroat in. You were on one of the best, the North Fork of the Coeur d Alene is great, when the floaters are not out, and south you have the Kelly Fork of the Clearwater, my personal favorite. I won't even get started on the opportunities in Montana, as I would need to clear my schedule for the next few hours.
As far as gear goes, the best method I have found for fishing these rivers solo is a pontoon boat, when the conditions are suitable to float. It allows you to fish more water and is very similar to fishing from a drift boat. For these rivers a 5 weight and 6 weight rod will be perfect, yes you need 2 if anyone asks :)
Silverbow Fly shop is a great place to get info on local rivers, they release weekly fishing reports. I would also take a few more guided trips, because you can absorb so much information from guides, it really helps with the learning curve. Enjoy man, this is a great time of year to hit these rivers, but you can enjoy this hobby year round in Idaho!
Yes.......very addictive. Once I find something like this......I get pretty consumed by it. I really enjoy the learning portion. Same thing happened in ND when I started Pheasant Hunting 15 years.

The couple times I went up on the CDA I went up above Shoshone to get away from the floaters. Had good luck for a green newbie.
 
OP
Coach529

Coach529

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2016
Messages
230
Location
Idaho Panhandle
There is a ton of fly fishing in the region. Just go! The more you fish, the more you’ll learn. Use what your guide taught you. Learn to read water and how to effectively present the fly. Keep your fly and gesr selection simple. Figure out what bugs hatch and when on your home river and then figure out a simple system to emulate them. Then focus on how to fish them effectively. Get away from the roadside hole hopping as the cutties get pounded there. Browns and rainbows are crazy fun too. Then there’s steelhead...pike, bass...and carp...and the mother of all fly fishing addiction: sight fishing the salt. Enjoy the journey!

Thanks!!

I have been just hole hopping now, but have been spending time on google earth and trying to locate some options I can hike into. I love getting out and discovering new places.
 

Boarmaster

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2019
Messages
197
Location
Fort Myers , FL
Always something new to learn if you tie your own flies. I was into it saltwater heavy 10 years ago. Kind of slacked back these days. Hunting more than back then.
 

dtrkyman

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
368
If you decide to tie flies check out tight line videos, he has some excellent instructional videos for specific patterns.
 

theleo91386

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
571
Location
Eastern Washington
Not sure if this is advice or just general observations:

%90 of trout can be caught using maybe 10 different fly patterns. For a day of fishing in the mountains you really don't need a fly box any larger than the size of your wallet.

The most versatile fly you'll ever cast is a black wolly bugger.

When you buy nymphs, try to buy ones tied on a jig hook, they snag less.

Don't go into the weeds with "serious" fly fishers about what is and isn't fly fishing. Enjoying time on the water is what it's about.

Spending a ton of money on rods and reels doesn't mean you'll see a big difference from cheaper options. Personally I view an expensive reel on a trout rod as more of a status symbol than anything else.

When you go to pick out flies, bug LIKE flies get more hits than bug SPECIFIC flies.
Exception being on highly pressured water where fish will see 100's of flies through out the year, you'll need to match the hatch in those situations.

Have fun. It's relaxing and you're in some beautiful country, enjoy it.
 

TC406

Member
Joined
May 22, 2019
Messages
68
Nice work, and welcome to the life that is fly fishing! Now you just have to start tying your own flies, then you'll find out how deep the rabbit hole really goes! I still haven't found the bottom, and I haven't even started building rods yet!
 
OP
Coach529

Coach529

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2016
Messages
230
Location
Idaho Panhandle
Not sure if this is advice or just general observations:

%90 of trout can be caught using maybe 10 different fly patterns. For a day of fishing in the mountains you really don't need a fly box any larger than the size of your wallet.

The most versatile fly you'll ever cast is a black wolly bugger.

When you buy nymphs, try to buy ones tied on a jig hook, they snag less.

Don't go into the weeds with "serious" fly fishers about what is and isn't fly fishing. Enjoying time on the water is what it's about.

Spending a ton of money on rods and reels doesn't mean you'll see a big difference from cheaper options. Personally I view an expensive reel on a trout rod as more of a status symbol than anything else.

When you go to pick out flies, bug LIKE flies get more hits than bug SPECIFIC flies.
Exception being on highly pressured water where fish will see 100's of flies through out the year, you'll need to match the hatch in those situations.

Have fun. It's relaxing and you're in some beautiful country, enjoy it.
That is some solid advice that I will take to heart.

The rod and reel kit I bought was pretty bare bones, but to be honest it cast as good IMO as my buddies $400 rig, at least for me at this stage. I appreciate craftsmanship and cool things, but functional is fine with me!! That being said, I have no problem investing in something I will use forever. I killed a ton of birds with a beat up 870 Express, but I sure love my Browning Citori.

 
OP
Coach529

Coach529

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2016
Messages
230
Location
Idaho Panhandle
The tie flying thing does not even interest me at this point......hell I struggle with normal fishing notes. I have 10 fat thumbs.......
 
OP
Coach529

Coach529

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2016
Messages
230
Location
Idaho Panhandle
My perfect day would be a 5-6 mile hike finding some amazing back country creeks without seeing a soul. I also have a very active and fishing interested 7 year old and an amazing wife who I think I get interested as well.
 

KurtR

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2015
Messages
896
Location
South Dakota
Moved to northern Idaho 2.5 years ago. Moved from North Dakota.

Never been much of a fisherman. We did not have many good lakes around and never really caught the bug for it.

Got a chance to go on a guided float on the St Joe with some buddies. I borrowed a rod from a coworker and picked up a general selection of flies. Had an amazing time, even though the fishing was pretty slow. Learned a ton, our guide had 25+ years of experience and was super patient with three totally green fisherman. Caught my first Cutthroat that day!!





Fast forward to a couple weeks ago, my wife surprised me for our 25th wedding anniversary. She bought me a complete set up.....rod/ reel, waders, boots and a net. Nothing special for gear....but a great way for me to see if this is something I want to do regularly. After a couple days of exploring the Coeur D Alene River area and fishing, I can say I am severely addicted.





Any advice on a forum like Rokslide, but geared towards fly fishing?
You missed out North Dakota has arguably two of the premier walleye fishery’s in the nation with devils lake and sakakawea.
 
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