Stone Glacier Re-Warming Drill

kevlar88

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There's really only two options right? Poly or nylon something. I'd bet it's a poly.
I'd bet as well, but I guess I'm just not my question clear enough. Do you know if they were using Gen-III ECWS level 2 bottoms, was it Underarmour cold gear, maybe something from beyond clothing? There are a lot of synthetics (poly or nylon) out there, just curious which one.
 

mj23polaris

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Maybe something out of the PCU lineup? I know there is a few companies that make garmits for PCU system Patagonia, Beyond Clothing, Halys, Wild Things Gear are a few I think?





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sneaky

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I'd bet as well, but I guess I'm just not my question clear enough. Do you know if they were using Gen-III ECWS level 2 bottoms, was it Underarmour cold gear, maybe something from beyond clothing? There are a lot of synthetics (poly or nylon) out there, just curious which one.
Those guys can source whatever they want. There's a million different options for base layers they could have been using. I'm betting that between that group there were probably a half dozen different base layers, if for no other reason than to compare dry times and warmth during the drill.

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AK Troutbum

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I don’t think what brand of BL is really all that important, just the fact that they had better results with synthetic than merino should be good enough. I understand that not all synthetic BL’s are created equal, but not all people are created equal either. Some people generate more heat than others, and everybody experiences cold differently. Too many subjective variables to try and factor in.


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tdot

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The trainer also noted something that I've learned to rely heavily on. Your next to skin layer should be the thinnest possible. I've done this for decades and it is a game changer on how efficient the system can be. I've tried cutting out that thin layer to save ounces and it always is a fail. This is true for both Merino and Synthetic.
 
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Ryan Avery

Ryan Avery

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The trainer also noted something that I've learned to rely heavily on. Your next to skin layer should be the thinnest possible. I've done this for decades and it is a game changer on how efficient the system can be. I've tried cutting out that thin layer to save ounces and it always is a fail. This is true for both Merino and Synthetic.
100% correct. I have tried lots of baselayers and keep coming back to Aerowool. It dries freaking fast and won't grab any funk for a least a week on me anyways.
 

cornfedkiller

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The lack of love for merino in that video has me wondering about my First Lite kiln hoody. I wear it all the time, but would a synthetic be better?

Not too worried about falling in a river, but staying dry from sweat is always a plus.
 
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sneaky

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Thicker merino, while it stays warm when wet, stays wet a long time. It drives me nuts. It's best to put on when you stop. My synthetic layers are usually dry in a few minutes once I stop. My merino not so much. The super thin stuff would dry quicker and help hold down the stink at least.

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Shraggs

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I love my merino, my skin can't tolerate synthetic at all, but agree it wicks moisture better and dries faster.

what i have done, especially if its cold enough for thicker merino BL, is use ultra thin silk first. i think tamarack??, it must be 50 weight comparatively and weighs a few ounces. REI is selling some now too, id guess its closer to 100 weight and its 6 ounces for top and bottom. In my experience, silk acts nearly as synthetic in terms of moisture transfer.

its been game changer for me in terms of wicking, but interestingly, if I'm generating sweat in this combo my mid weight wool is not getting as wet. the whole systems seems to be working better to my outer layers.

ymmv

cool video.

sold on treated down in sleep gear, and with less washing and wear and tear i think the treatment has a longer life than in a jacket. if im going to get wet, i like synthetic puffy's
 

Whaledriver

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Interesting video. Not sure it has true real world application. My experience with treated down has been positive. I used a Sierra down bag for 5 years. It seemed to do well with moisture for the most part. I finally did wash it and the down clumped up unbelievable. Took me nearly 3 hours of kneading and tennis ball/dryer to get them out.
 

Big Nasty

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Interesting video. Not sure it has true real world application. My experience with treated down has been positive. I used a Sierra down bag for 5 years. It seemed to do well with moisture for the most part. I finally did wash it and the down clumped up unbelievable. Took me nearly 3 hours of kneading and tennis ball/dryer to get them out.

My real world has seen this many times, No I haven't jumped in a river on purpose but have been out soaking wet and needing to re-warm. Hiking all day in pouring rain, slipping in creek crossing, out for hrs in wet heavy snow, and resulted in being soaking wet from head to toe. First instinct is to remove all clothes and get in sleeping bag, which is fastest way to warm up but leaves all your clothes wet for days. Especially sucks when on a 10 day back pack hunt. It sucks the next morning putting all those wet clothes back on and trying to dry during the day, Wish I'd seen this video 20 yrs ago, would have saved me some harsh lessons but a guy figures it out pretty quick after a time or 2. The gear is so good nowadays its crazy to think how soft we are getting from the old dudes who wore jeans and flannel
 

RCB

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I'm no expert on surviving hypothermic situations, but if I were in that situation my guess would be to remove the wet clothing and build a fire. Am I off base here? Fire would help dry the clothing and provide a source of warmth beyond just my internal metabolism. I guess a downside of that is that you'd have to build your fire outside the tent, where it might be very windy, which can steal heat away very fast. I guess you might also have very little finger dexterity to get that fire going?
 

sneaky

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Stone Glacier isn't the only company using HyperDry down in their gear, other manufacturers use it as well. Opens up more options if someone is building up a system from scratch. Sometimes mixing and matching isn't a bad thing.

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