Switching from bag to quilt

sr80

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2014
Messages
686
Location
British Columbia
I made the switch this spring, i was very skeptical about quilts, thought theyd be drafty and cold. But i love my E&E Relavation.
 

ChrisS

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2013
Messages
769
Location
A fix back east
I've found that the pad straps help me a bit w/r/t drafts. Except that the little hole in the footbox when its cinched up which can be plugged with some socks or something. If you're going for a colder quilt, I'd recommend a sewn footbox instead of a snap and cinched closed one.

One morning, I woke up in CO in my tipi with the quilt soaking wet on top from condensation as a result of moisture from my body. The next morning, it was covered in a thin sheet of ice from some condensation, but it was in the 20s, so everything froze. I didn't notice either time until I was getting up to go hunting. I left it hanging up and it was plenty dry by the time I got back to camp.

I'm kicking around the idea to make a synthetic 10F quilt this winter with a sewn footbox.
 

Formidilosus

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Messages
1,123
I went from multiple synthetic bags to down bags to water treated down quilts. I won't be going the other way. Some buddies and I just spent 10 days in the Frank Church Wilderness where it rained 4 out of those days. We had a floorless tipi, a couple of nights one spent under a tarp, and one had a hammock. Temperatures ranged from 20's to 70's. Between us we used a synthetic 20 degree bag, a Marmot 0 degree down bag, a 30 degree synthetic quilt and a EE Revolation 20 degree treated down quilt. There was a heavy amount of condensation most mornings. I never had an issue with the EE quilt. On the way out I swam across the Salmon river with all my gear soaking it completely. In the below picture you can see how much water the down jacket (not treated) absorbed vs. the EE treated quilt. The quilt was around 80% water logged, after wringing it out it still maintained its loft and was 90-95% dry within 15 minutes.









Now if I were somewhere like SE AK where it is going to rain every single day I might with go with synthetic, but for anywhere in the west I'm sticking with the water treated down quilt.


As for the difference between a bag and a quilt- four of my friends that I backpack hunt with every year have all switched to EE water treated down quilts from bags. None of them are going back. I don't agree with most sizing advice though- I'm 5'9", 185lbs and while I can make do with a Long/Wide, I much prefer a long/extra wide. No complaints on the temperature ratings with the EE quilts. If the temp gets down to the bags rating then I use the straps that come with them and don't have any issues with drafts.
 

16Bore

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2014
Messages
2,174
EE is some good stuff. I think the first night in the thing I woke up several times thinking "how the hell am I not cold"
 

450

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2015
Messages
121
I am in the same boat kinda. I have been thinking about trying a quilt myself but can't make up my mind on whether to go with down or synthetic. I live in Fairbanks, Alaska and like to do float hunts and fly-out hunts. I have made the switch over to a floorless tent and use a bivy to put my sleeping pad/sleeping bag into. I also toss and turn a lot in my sleep and usually wind up sleeping on my side.
 

JayPee

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
60
Location
Buckley, WA
So far, I haven't been loving my quilt. I get cold easy and I guess it shows. Generally wake up several times a night to reposition and try to keep it sucked in around me and get comfortable. It's a 10 degree and about 30 degrees is where it gets cold. But so far I'm only wearing base layers and socks and a light beanie. This next trip out I will try upping the clothing
 

orionsbrother

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
860
Location
IL
Are you using straps when it's colder? Do you generally sleep cold? Also, what's the R Value of your pad?
 

JayPee

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
60
Location
Buckley, WA
Are you using straps when it's colder? Do you generally sleep cold? Also, what's the R Value of your pad?
Yes I generally sleep cold. Using both straps and a BA qcore sl R4.7? I think. I have the foot box zipped up and the lower strap sucked in. Part of it I think is the wind usually swirls around at night and blows in the open side of the shelter where my head is and right inside the quilt. I think for next year I might upgrade to a bit more substantial shelter like a Cimarron or Tut
 

orionsbrother

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
860
Location
IL
I've only been using a quilt for the last couple of years and my time in the field took another hit this year because of complications. Perhaps guys that have been using quilts for longer will add their thoughts.

Before you bail out on the quilt, try using a lightweight silk liner with it. I use one to try to keep skin oils and sweat off the quilt to reduce the need for washing. I also tend to wear my cleanest, dry base layers at night. I am concerned that repeated washing will reduce the effectiveness of the treated down. The liner and base layer will add a few degrees to the quilt rating as well.

As a cold sleeper, if you aren't already wearing a balaclava to sleep in cooler weather, put one on. If you're already using a balaclava, maybe try one of the down hoods.

Check to see that your quilt is wide enough too. Especially if you're a side sleeper or an active sleeper, you may need to go a little wider. I tend to sleep like I'm having a seizure and have three kids that like to benefit from dad's warmth when it's cooler and we're camping, so I went wider. It's a couple of ounces, but feels comfortable in MT Archery and luxurious in WY rifle when my Nalgene bottle freezes next to my head.

If you're running a tarp, maybe try a slightly larger tarp that you can pitch to reduce wind blowing in or rotate to put your feet to the open side?

That's all I've got. I'm not the consummate quilt guru. Someone else may have some additional thoughts. I hope it works out for you.
 

gobbler1662

Senior Member
Joined
May 31, 2012
Messages
1,014
Location
Prineville, Oregon
Welpro222, just make sure if you switch from bag to quilt that you address your sleping pad. Meaning you are going from some insulation underneath you compressed or not, to laying directly on the top of your pad. Make sure you've got an adequate R-value pad under you or you will have a very bad experience.
 

Broken Compass

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2012
Messages
289
Location
Utah
I've only used my EE quilt June-September and in Utah.
But I can't figure out why I ever used a bag.


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stratofisher

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2016
Messages
186
Location
Caseyville, IL
Thinking about going with a EE quilt solution for Idaho archery elk during September. Would a 20 deg quilt be enough or should I push for a 10 deg quilt. As a bigger guy 5'11" 250lbs I have always hated mummy bags and thinking I want to try the quilt path.
 

ianpadron

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Messages
869
Thinking about going with a EE quilt solution for Idaho archery elk during September. Would a 20 deg quilt be enough or should I push for a 10 deg quilt. As a bigger guy 5'11" 250lbs I have always hated mummy bags and thinking I want to try the quilt path.
20° is perfect for September.

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