The 1 Thing You Learned- ELK

DawnPatrol

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Dec 22, 2020
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216
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Nunya
It’s very difficult to kill bedded bulls by still hunting if you don’t know exactly where they are bedded (ie glassed them up earlier). Got busted repeatedly.

I have killed elk by still hunting in the past, but they have always been up feeding in the timber in the late afternoon when I found them. If they are bedded, I think they see and hear well enough to pick me off most of the time, even if I have the wind right.
 

Npike4040

Junior Member
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Apr 22, 2022
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Location
missouri
I have seen some people give the advice to "shoot on the first day what you would shoot on the last". To me, this is terrible advice. Now bear with me!

If that is what you want to do, fine! It is your choice and do whatever makes you happy. However, it would NOT make some people happy to shoot a cow on the first day and then they get into bulls later in the week. Many people, myself included, would rather take the chance to go home empty handed than shoot their non-target animal on the first day and then have regrets. That is entirely okay too. My advice is pretty simple, shoot what makes you happy at the time! If that is a calf on day 1 of a 14 day hunt in a LE unit, so be it! If that means you pass up a 6X6 on a 3 day OTC hunt and don't get one but are okay with that, so be it! But don't listen to some cute saying and then have regrets. Applying your values to someone else's hunt shouldn't de done in my opinion. And yes, 3 times I have passed up cows and later shot bulls. Twice I passed up a cow and did not get a bull. I am okay with that. A big part of it for me is that I don't want to end the hunt so soon!

So my advice would be to be very careful about telling others what they should or should not shoot. It is certainly okay to tell them about relative game density, but let them make up their own mind.
I very much agree with this!
 

LBSpear30

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2019
Messages
26
Get in good enough shape that you can hunt 3 hours before daylight until dark. If you're in good enough shape to hunt hard you will learn the important things on your own. Almost no hunter is going to tell you their really good stuff and the info from game wardens can be invaluable.
 

Erussell01

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Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
422
Get in good enough shape that you can hunt 3 hours before daylight until dark. If you're in good enough shape to hunt hard you will learn the important things on your own. Almost no hunter is going to tell you their really good stuff and the info from game wardens can be invaluable.
Got some of my best Intel from the local Game Wardens here. Make friends with them and they will share the good stuff
 

Erussell01

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
422
Get in good enough shape that you can hunt 3 hours before daylight until dark. If you're in good enough shape to hunt hard you will learn the important things on your own. Almost no hunter is going to tell you their really good stuff and the info from game wardens can be invaluable.
Got some of my best Intel from the local Game Wardens here. Make friends with them and they will share the good stuff
 

Erussell01

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Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
422
I had a realization today... I learned more than I thought last year. Kinda crazy but as I look forward to my next trip out It gets me excited to learn more.

Last year I wanted to call the elk. I spent my time looking for the elk to call to. This year I'll do better at hunting the elk that I have in front of me. Calling, spot and stalk or ambush. Let the situation dictate my style.
 
OP
Oregon Hunter

Oregon Hunter

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Aug 30, 2013
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Beaverton, Oregon
It’s very difficult to kill bedded bulls by still hunting if you don’t know exactly where they are bedded (ie glassed them up earlier). Got busted repeatedly.

I have killed elk by still hunting in the past, but they have always been up feeding in the timber in the late afternoon when I found them. If they are bedded, I think they see and hear well enough to pick me off most of the time, even if I have the wind right.
I would agree with you and add that there are usually other elk around, which means more eyes and noses. Do you tend to just stay out of areas you might suspect hold bedded elk altogether?
 
Joined
May 19, 2022
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I pass on legal elk almost every year, sometimes I’d like to go back, but I’ve also been awarded with a much nicer bull!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Sled

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Joined
Jun 11, 2018
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1,531
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Utah
what if you've waited 5 to 10 years to draw the tag?

I wish 5-10 years was all it took to draw a tag in the rut. Instead it's better for me to find ways to hunt elk yearly and take the ones I want. I typically do not pass on legal animals being a meat hunter. If I waited 20 years or more, I might be a bit picky if I'm in the elk. If they're scarce I'll take an elk sooner based on the situation.
 

Erussell01

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Joined
Jan 30, 2022
Messages
422
what if you've waited 5 to 10 years to draw the tag?
For me, it's all about the experience. If the critter gets me excited, it's game on. If not, I won't talk myself into shooting it. Whether the tag was otc, 5 or 10 year draw, once in a lifetime, if the animal makes my heart go pitter patter I'm in.
 

A-Brakke

Junior Member
Joined
May 21, 2022
Messages
42
Never pass on a response bugle….no matter how steep, deep, rugged, or far. Always assume it’s an elk rather than another hunter and simply moving on. Year after year I watch expierenced guys strike out cause they just couldn’t fathom an elk sounding a certain way and doubting what they are hearing. They all sound different…chuckles, grunts, raspy, sharp, and shitty. Chase them all you can’t kill what you never chased.

I do a A LOT of solo hunting with 2 buddies…….🥴 they still can figure it out god bless ‘em.
 

DawnPatrol

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Joined
Dec 22, 2020
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216
Location
Nunya
I would agree with you and add that there are usually other elk around, which means more eyes and noses. Do you tend to just stay out of areas you might suspect hold bedded elk altogether?
In the middle of the day, I will try to avoid it. Before 10 and after 3, I would go into a bedding area (wind permitting) and still hunt and try to catch em up feeding in the timber or small openings.

I mostly hunt late season rifle, so I’m talking about single bulls (or a few together); but a heard of 20 elk would be even worse.

My main observation this year was that when they are sitting silently in their perfect comfort spot and just looking for you, it’s pretty hard to get close and see them first when you don’t know exactly where they are.
 
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