The Importance of Cross Training

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Becca

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Great article Rebecca and quite the routine you've got!
My thoughts exactly! Great article, and good inspiration!

About how much time do you devote to your workout routine, Rebecca? I sometimes feel like mine takes over my freetime on the days I don't work, and since I work 13 hour days with an additional 2 hours of commute time it can be pretty hard to do much on days when I am working (to clarify, I typically only work 2 days in 7, and my job at the hospital can be fairly physically demanding so I don't worry about not "exercising" on days when I work)
 

robby denning

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Great inspiring read Rebecca and your points are valid. Running is a GREAT way to prepare for the high country, but... how often does a hunter really run whn big game hunting. Cross training best prepares the hunter for his/her event and so glad to see you endorse that.

Great pics, too
 

marshrat

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Liked the article. I have been incorporating CrossFit and distance hiking into my mountain country prep and training. I have focused more on building leg strength and hiking with a weighted pack than anything else simply because we just don't have that much access to hills around here, at least not without driving a hour or more away. I have tried to take the kids more and more on these excursions, and it gives me more motivation to stay doing that type of workout for extended amounts of time.
 
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rebecca francis

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My thoughts exactly! Great article, and good inspiration!

About how much time do you devote to your workout routine, Rebecca? I sometimes feel like mine takes over my freetime on the days I don't work, and since I work 13 hour days with an additional 2 hours of commute time it can be pretty hard to do much on days when I am working (to clarify, I typically only work 2 days in 7, and my job at the hospital can be fairly physically demanding so I don't worry about not "exercising" on days when I work)
I always exercise at a minimum of one hour....but usually do more, particularly on my long run day. It definitely sounds like you don't need to exercise on the days you work. I found when I was going to school full time a few years ago, I had to get up at 4:45 am in order to get my workout in and be on time for school. It sucked so bad! But I knew if I didn't do it then, I wouldn't get it done. Now, my life isn't quite as hectic, and I don't get up as early to workout...but I still have to schedule it as part of my day. It's hard to find time, but it is worth it. I have a lot of commotion in my house, so that is "my time" that I need in order to stay sane! Lol!
 

fire arrow

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Great inspiring read Rebecca and your points are valid. Running is a GREAT way to prepare for the high country, but... how often does a hunter really run whn big game hunting. Cross training best prepares the hunter for his/her event and so glad to see you endorse that.

Great pics, too
I agree more is better. The more you do the better you are prepared. But running, especially trail running/ultra's will give you some thing p90x/cross fit won't. A mental edge of if I can run a 50, then there is no reason I can't take my lazy butt over one more drainage. Plus you learn to listen to your body. If you wait until your hungery eat, your a little late, and your sugar will tank. If you wait until your thirsty to drink, especially at 10,000 plus, hello bad headache. If you can run through the night to the finish line, stay up finish taking care of your elk, and hike him off the hill in the cool of the night. I'm not saying people need to run ultras to be a good backcountry hunter, it just helps by giving you a little mental edge.

This is also the first year I am doing something other than running, cross fit, and I already see the benifits to doing both.
 

Bighorse

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Enjoyed the article Rebecca. I have a background in Tri too. I also used to race MTB. Now I swim, bike, lift, climb, and Crossfit. I'm into moving.
Being in the mountains and moving is pleasure to the prepared. Albeit warm, sweaty pleasure. But who doesn't like that, right?

I'll be in the pool tonight for an hour with the masters team. Yesterday I biked up to Blue lake and sat with my Swaro spotting for emerging bears and Mt. Goat, 14 mile round trip.

Be honest with yourself too. Don't injure yourself trying to be tough. Diversity in training is a great way to stay motivated and strong .
 
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rebecca francis

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I have done part of a 50 and have wanted to do a full one ever since. You are definitely correct....you have to learn to listen to your body and stay ahead of it. In a situation like that you crossover to a point that the mental strength is as necessary as the physical strength.

Bighorse, do you pre mountain biking or road biking?
 

Bighorse

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If I had my choice? MTB.

I live on a island, Baranof. In Sitka, Alaska. There is little road here and the trails are wet, wet, wet. The terrain also doesn't lend itself to real trail riding like you would find in the Western States. So I end up on the road and light trails. It takes away the pounding of running in my crosstraining strategy. We have exceptional trail running conditions here with real dynamic and vertical trails to enjoy.

I added Kayaking to my mix since moving here. Thats kind of unique and have used it hunting for bears, goats, and deer in this region.

MTB is the real deal. It's fast, dynamic, and fun. Your balance is honed too, more so than road riding.
 
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