The worst game or fish you've eaten

Beendare

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I think mine was those Spanish goats on Hawaii......

My sister in law sent this over and its too funny. Have you ever eaten the Icelandic stinky fish Hakarl?
[video=youtube;e-qflm0APTk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-qflm0APTk[/video]

From Wiki
Kæstur hákarl (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈhauːkʰardl̥]) (Icelandic for "fermented shark") is a national dish of Iceland consisting of a Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) or other sleeper shark which has been cured with a particular fermentation process and hung to dry for four to five months. Kæstur hákarl has a strong ammonia-rich smell and fishy taste.[1]

Kæstur hákarl is readily available in Icelandic stores and is eaten year-round, but is also served as part of a þorramatur, a selection of traditional Icelandic food served at þorrablót in midwinter.

Consumption


Kæstur hákarl contains a large amount of ammonia and has a strong smell, similar to many cleaning products. It is often served in cubes on toothpicks. Those new to it may gag involuntarily on the first attempt to eat it because of the high ammonia content.[1] First-timers are sometimes advised to pinch their nose while taking the first bite, as the smell is much stronger than the taste. It is often eaten with a shot of the local spirit, a type of akvavit called brennivín.

It comes in two varieties; chewy and reddish glerhákarl (lit. "glassy shark") from the belly, and white and soft skyrhákarl (lit. "skyr shark") from the body.
Preparation

The meat of the Greenland shark is poisonous when fresh, due to a high content of urea and trimethylamine oxide, but may be consumed after being processed.[2][3]

The traditional method is by gutting and beheading a Greenland or sleeper shark and placing it in a shallow hole dug in gravelly sand, with the now cleaned cavity resting on a small mound of sand. The shark is then covered with sand and gravel, and stones are placed on top of the sand in order to press the shark. In this way the fluids are pressed out of the body. The shark ferments in this fashion for 6–12 weeks depending on the season. Following this curing period, the shark is then cut into strips and hung to dry for several months. During this drying period a brown crust will develop, which is removed prior to cutting the shark into small pieces and serving.

It is possible to witness the traditional preparation process at Bjarnarhöfn Shark Museum on Snæfellsnes.[4]

The modern method is just to press the shark's meat in a large drained plastic container.[5]
Reactions

Chef Anthony Bourdain described kæstur hákarl as "the single worst, most disgusting and terrible tasting thing" he has ever eaten.[1]

Chef Gordon Ramsay challenged James May to sample three "delicacies" (Laotian snake whiskey, bull penis, and kæstur hákarl) on The F Word; after eating kæstur hákarl, Ramsay spat it out, although May kept his down. May reacted with, "You disappoint me, Ramsay" and offered to do it again.[6]

On season two's Iceland episode of Travel Channel's Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern, Andrew Zimmern described the smell as reminding him of "some of the most horrific things I've ever breathed in my life," but said it tasted much better than it smelled. He described the taste as "sweet, nutty and only faintly fishy." Nonetheless, he did note of kæstur hákarl: "That's hardcore. That's serious food. You don't want to mess with that. That's not for beginners."

In one of season five's final episodes of Animal Planet's River Monsters, Biologist and Angler Jeremy Wade mentions that the flesh "smells of urine" that has "a really strong aftertaste, it really kicks in. It really kicks in at the back of the throat after you take the first bit." He further states that the meat was really unlike anything he's tried before; that it is like really strong cheese but with a definite fish element.

Archaeologist Neil Oliver tasted it in the BBC documentary Vikings as part of examining the Viking diet. He described it as reminiscent of "blue cheese but a hundred times stronger".
 

oldgoat

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Diving Duck of some kind in West Texas and muddy tasting catfish from very South end of the Mississippi.
 

wapitibob

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Duck #2, first one was awesome. Second one was like eating the bottom of the pond. Close 2nd was some store bought catfish. No animal in the neighborhood would even touch it.
 

itsTyrtruion

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Caribou and it isn't even close.

I read that the same as the "theres no elk in Idaho" posts...

bufflehead or common merganser. the merganser won the bad smell hands down tho... My dog retrieves coots with no issue, but got 5 feet from the merg and turned around. good dog!!!
 

MTNRCHR

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I had Tahr in New Zealand this spring that was pretty awful.
 

Dinger

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I had Tahr in New Zealand this spring that was pretty awful.

We had a very nice fresh Tahr curry last time I was there......it was tasty, though the meat was well flavoured with spices and tender like it should be in any curry.
 

adamm88

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I had a rutting whitetail buck that ran probally 1-2 miles wounded before we caught up to it and killed it, When cooking the meat it smelled like the smell of a rutting buck, stinky like ahole.
 

Btaylor

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I read that the same as the "theres no elk in Idaho" posts...

bufflehead or common merganser. the merganser won the bad smell hands down tho... My dog retrieves coots with no issue, but got 5 feet from the merg and turned around. good dog!!!

You can't make a maggot eat a merganser.
 

16Bore

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Goose.....I tried preparing it 6 ways to Sunday and it never tasted like anything other than warm turtle shit.
 

ChrisS

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Goose.....I tried preparing it 6 ways to Sunday and it never tasted like anything other than warm turtle shit.
I'm not a waterfowler, but a friend of mine is and makes goose pastrami. My wife and thought it was fantastic.

I've had some farmed tilapia that tasted like a dirty aquarium. I won't buy it again. With overfishing and depleted fish stocks, being an inlander I won't touch seafood unless I'm at the ocean or if they're freshwater fish I've caught myself. Even pickerel can be a delicious meal. Haven't tried carp, but I don't fish for them so ...

Haven't had bad game meat yet.
 

Johnboy

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Caribou and it isn't even close.

Was it a bull in mid-October? My understanding is that bull caribou will literally ingest the urine of cow caribou during the rut. The urine is delivered to the bull's muscles via the bloodstream, causing the harvested meat to taste like caribou pee. I'm not making this up.
 

Studd muffin

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I second the guy that said merganser. That is just some bad stuff. My dad made a duck gumbo once with a variety of ducks. You could definitely tell if you got the merganser.
 
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