Trail running shoe reccomendations

Stickerbush

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Jul 4, 2016
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Looking into getting a good pair of trail runners for training, day hikes and some multi day ultralight stuff. Not necessarily going to be trail running just fast paced hiking. Seems like a few new brands have entered the space recently, looking at Brooks Cascadias, Altra, Hoka One, New Balance Leadvilles to name a few. I would really like to try them all out but that could get spendy, thanks
 

duchntr

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Anchorage,Ak
Lasportiva bushido's work real well for me, before that speedcrosses. Try Zappos free shipping both ways or rei if you have one local, they usually have a good selection stocked.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2016
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It would be helpful if you posted what features you are looking for. All of those brands you listed are good brands but each of them have different qualities. Some of them have lots/none of arch support or narrow/wide toe boxes. Some of them have a steep drop all the way to zero drop in the shoe.

The Cascadia's that I have use minimal arch support and have a curvature that helps correct any over-pronating of the foot but they have a decent size heel to toe drop that may put more pressure on your knees. I picked up a pair of Xero Prio shoes recently as I am switching to a more minimal type shoe for light backpacking/fishing trips that has a large toe box and zero drop from heel to toe.

I will be replacing my Cascadia's soon and am looking at a few pairs of minimalist waterproof backpacking boots. Considering something similar to the innov8 roclite 325 GTX for my hunting boot but haven't put too much time into it yet.
 
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Lawnboi

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North Central Wi
Inov 8. Love thier trail runners, grip is insane. One to add to the list. Highly underrated and little known shoe brand, they make a trail runner for every one, low heel drop to a decent amount of drop, minimalist to heavy cushion, little grip to straight Velcro.
 

WyoElk

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Just ordered a pair of the NB Leadville's. I'll try to let you know once they come in.
 
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Stickerbush

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I'm not really familiar with these terms zero drop and over pronating. Are these things that can be measured at a shoe store?
 

russ_outdoors

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Utah
I'll add the Saucony Peregrines to the list. As always the best shoes are the ones that fit you. I use the Peregrines for hiking, backpacking and trail running. They have a rock plate, good grip and cushion and I can usually get a year of hard use out of them.

I'll second the REI recommendation as well. They usually carry a good selection of this type of shoe.
 
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I'm not really familiar with these terms zero drop and over pronating. Are these things that can be measured at a shoe store?
Here's a picture of shoes that can correct incorrect pronation on the right vs. a straighter type shoe. I'm not too knowledgeable on curved shoes as I just look to avoid it and get straight shoes so you can visually see it at the store. As far as heel-toe drop, I usually just look at the manufacturer specs of the shoe. Most places are starting to list that information online.
View attachment 49730
 

boom

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Sep 11, 2013
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i wear the soloman speed cross. but seriously for only one reason. the laces. they dont grab thorns and burrs.

but since i moved to the forest, i have been running trails with my regular running shoes. no issues. some running coach suggested that and it seems to be working fine.
 

Mike Mongelli

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Dec 14, 2016
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MD
I have had several different versions of Cascadia's and currently using Montrail's. I have been using Hoka's on the road for a while now and will probably try one of their trail shoes next.
 

Boreal

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Anchorage, AK
Altra Lone Peak Neoshell mid for me. Awesome comfort if you've got a wide forefoot. The zero drop takes a little to get used to, but for light hikers I won't go back. Very comfortable, and now that they have a waterproof shell, Altra has a hit.


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Stickerbush

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Jul 4, 2016
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Just scored 2 pair of Brooks cascadias for 100 bucks! 10th and 11th editions so I'll try these out for the time bieng.
 

mudcat81

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Dec 29, 2016
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Wisconsin
I recently picked up a pair of Merrell Moab Ventilators. So far, I absolutely love them. I was looking for a pair of backup hiking shoes that could also double as a camp shoe. I am not worried about the little bit of added weight now that I have been wearing them around. After work, I kick off the Red Wings and put these on and do whatever I would typically do in my regular tennis shoes. They are super comfortable and provide very good traction. I purchased them from Moosejaw for $62 shipped.
 

mvmnts

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Feb 2, 2017
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Longmont, CO
Hard to really say without knowing more. For me I like the Altra Lone Peak for groomed trails, and if I'm going off trail or doing a lot of rock hopping, I will step up to something burlier. I like the La Sportiva Ultra Raptors for that. They are what I like to call "aggressively ugly", but they perform excellent.
 

ColoradoHunterHiker

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Sep 20, 2016
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Colorado
For years and many pairs, I used these: Adidas Rockadia but have recently enjoyed these: Salomon Speedcross 4. Truly with so many companies, just try to find the one that fits your foot the best (little to no sliding/movement when laced, but not too tight) and then get a good moisture wicking sock that keeps your foot dry.
 
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