Training with full kit.....

Aron Snyder

2
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
Jan 23, 2012
Messages
5,014
Location
The Wilderness
I've been getting behind on my PM's and emails, so I'm going to try and answer as many as I can tonight on the forums. This will give other a chance to chime in with their preferred methods.

So I've gotten several PM's asking what I use for weight when training, so here goes.

Unless you're doing heavy training (80lbs +), I would strongly suggest training with all of your gear (full kit in military terms).

The only thing you need to change from your EXACT packing list would be your sleeping bag. You don't want to compress your bag all the time, so the SB will need to be simulated. I use a couple sweaters and T shirts for this and make sure the weight is pretty close to my bag.

I train with my full kit for several reasons, one being the weight will be what you'll actually be packing up the mountain! The other is to get your pack and gear figured out well ahead of time.

You'll quickly figure out what you want in each pocket, what should go in the main bag and how the gear inside the main bag should be placed for best comfort.

It's amazing how much a pack that has been incorrectly loaded can bug the hell out of you in a few short minutes. Training with your full kit will make loading your pack second nature.

Keep in mind that I'm loading up 10-14days of gear and food for this, so my training pack is pretty heavy. If you only go for 2 nights, add another 10 days of food and another 3 or 4 liters of water. That will get you in the 45-60 lb range pretty quick.
 

Craig4791

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2012
Messages
2,142
Location
Soldotna,AK
This is exactly what i do, always thought it made more sense. Except for the sleeping bag substitute..... never really thought of the compression downsides but its a very good point. Especially since i have a new slickbag on the way i will incorporate this into training loads.
 

Jager

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2012
Messages
658
Location
Australia
Can't argue with that Aron.

Macca's cheeseburgers would probably last for months withouth dehydrating.
 

123 4/8 P&Y

Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2012
Messages
268
And all this time I've been using landscaping bricks and steel weights wrapped in towels. I guess I was simulating a load of meat. :)
 

Rocky

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2012
Messages
352
Location
SW Washington
Great information I was currently thinking about this. It is funny how difficult we make things when the answer in in our closet !
 

7mag.

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2012
Messages
1,412
Location
Buckley, Wa.
Thanks Aron, for the sleeping bag advice. I've been unpacking it at the end of every training hike and re-packing it before the next one. It never even dawned on me to substitute if with something else.
 

Snyd

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Messages
702
Location
AK
I don't pack any gear on my evening weekly training hikes in the summer while getting in sheep shape. Only on real hikes. I start out with filler material and some weights and water at 20-35lbs. I end up with a 50+ lb bag of cement or popcorn and add weights to get up to 85-100lbs. Been doin it for years. Works for me.
 

Rizzy

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
1,414
Location
Idaho
I have always just used my full loadout similar to how Aron describes. This year I have been training for a pack test and using more than my typical loadout. My typical loadout is around 40# and I have been using 50#. I like the results I'm getting with the slight increase in weight and plan to incrementally add more throughout the summer.
 
OP
Aron Snyder

Aron Snyder

2
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
Jan 23, 2012
Messages
5,014
Location
The Wilderness
I have always just used my full loadout similar to how Aron describes. This year I have been training for a pack test and using more than my typical loadout. My typical loadout is around 40# and I have been using 50#. I like the results I'm getting with the slight increase in weight and plan to incrementally add more throughout the summer.

Yep, doesn't take much to chunk in a 15-25 lb dumb bell or plate (along with your other gear)to crank up the intensity.
 

7mag.

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2012
Messages
1,412
Location
Buckley, Wa.
I have always just used my full loadout similar to how Aron describes. This year I have been training for a pack test and using more than my typical loadout. My typical loadout is around 40# and I have been using 50#. I like the results I'm getting with the slight increase in weight and plan to incrementally add more throughout the summer.

Are you a wildland fire fighter? I just took my pack test on Friday. I took mine with a bunch of DNR guys in their early twenties, it pisses me off that it is so easy for them.
 

KMD

Banned
Joined
Mar 20, 2013
Messages
542
I wrap a 50lb. dumbell in an old bath towel, stuff another rolled up towel down the bottom of the pack, cinch that sucker down so its' riding about mid-back, and go...
 

Rizzy

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
1,414
Location
Idaho
This will be my first season Wildland FF, and yeah the guys in their 20s don't seem to train so hard for it if at all...lol
I passed it no problem but having never done it I wanted to be sure so I trained with 50# and 3.5 miles. This morning I did 4 miles with 52#, its amazing how much you can feel the added 2#.
 

fillthefreezer

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
2,804
Location
eatonvile, wa
i typically train with 60-80lbs in my pack depending on time and terrain. winter is usually truck chains and then add a water bladder, medicine ball or dumbbell. summer is full kit plus beer :p
 

unm1136

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2012
Messages
426
Location
Albuquerque NM
Aron

Few Questions. I know you have had these questions before but Im debating on the answers. Clothing you take? So do you really do 10 to 14 days in the backwoods with only 1 set of clothing and a few extra pairs of socks? my clothing right now is upwards of 12 lbs that includes rain gear hunting suit 5 shirts 4 socks 3 under and my long underwear.
Should I lighten this up and how do you manage in the backwoods for so long with minimal clothing. I find I do better if I have fresh Clothes and incase any inclement weather I have dry stuff to change into. Maybe Im over thinking that I dont know. I really dont have like a Skitka Hunting suit but scent lok coat and I just take all super light weight nylon clothes. The kind that wick moisture and dry fast. My pants I have a really lightweight camo overpants I put over my lightweight hiking pants. Then I just take a few pairs of these. Am I overpacking? Other then doing a wipe down once a night do you do anything while out there with just 1 hunting suit to keep bad human scent to a minimum cause after a few days I know it has to be getting up there on the yuck Charts Lmao. Best way I can put that.

Second Part:

Food. I know Mountain house food is out there, but do you do anything special for food? How many Calories a day do you pack for and whats your load out for food like? Do you got any high calorie high protein type foods that are prepared like an emergency snack type deal? Would love to hear more from you on these 2 topics.

Not Aron, and no out of state hunts until the wife finishes school in a few years, so I am limited to five day hunts. For five day hunts I pack one set of hunting clothes and one set of camp clothes. I take two sets of underwear, and about 4 pair socks, including a super heavyweight wool set to wear at night in the hammock. I wear my hunting clothes from breakfast, about 1 hour before sunrise to about 45 minutes after sunset. Then I change into camp clothes and hang my hunting clothes. I used to do martial arts with a former SAS man, who turned me on to reading SAS memoirs, and this was one of their principles that made sense. If my hunting clothes don't dry out over night, and there are tricks that I use to dry them if need be, then it sucks to put on wet clothes in the morning, but the suck only lasts an hour or so, and then it feels more like you were freshly wetted, rather than put on wet. My camp clothes are kept in a waterproof bag, or over my ridgeline, so they stay fairly dry. If I sweat badly at night I toss a hot hands between my underquilt and my hammock, and leave the camp clothes in the hammock, and even damp down is dry by the end of the day.


pat
 
Top